Pages: [1] 2  All   Go Down
Print

Topic: Packing Right, Packing Light!  (Read 6214 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Dr Gil
"Datsa notta noise, eetsa sound!"
*

Reputation 13
Offline Offline

Years Contributed: '06, '07, '08
Motorcycles: '02 Moto Guzzi Le Mans
GPS: Eureka, CA USA
Miles Typed: 1797

My Photo Gallery



WWW

Ignore
« on: December 19, 2006, 09:14:18 PM »

Let me be upfront with you.  I am a notorious "overpacker."  I should belong to some sort of 12 step program.  I actually have been known to pack a thermos of coffee with me when I ride.  

As I mentioned in an earlier thread the lovely Beck-zuki (Crikey, that's a crack-a-fat ST.N name!) and I recently had the privilege of having Dantesdame (Colleen) stay overnight (yet again) at the "Un-Official (will that accreditation ever come through?) West Coast B&B&B.  She left us with a copy of Sound Rider's. The book, while a bit simplistic, got me to thinking.

I know I could go lighter but how?  And here's my confusion...besides the obvious things I can do without (the thermos) where can I cut down?  I followed some of the book's more obvious suggestions but am still pretty confused.   Headscratch

I read from ST.Netter's posts that they always carry things like:  first aid kits, tire plugging gear, full tools, spare cables and parts, etc., etc.  So I do this too...only this takes up an enormous amount of space.  It takes up one entire saddle bag for me.  That leaves one saddle bag, a tailbag and a tank bag to hold: 7 days of clothing (the amount I like to carry to "stay on the road indefinably"), toiletries, cameras, cell phones, maps, emergency food, whiskey, water, bike locks, etc (and this doesn't even take into account that I know some of you pack a computer and extra fuel...or heaven forbid, CAMPING GEAR!).  Crazy

I do most of my riding during the winter months which means packing clothing for all sorts of weather. So what's the deal?  Why am I always out of room in my bags?  Do you all cut corners in regards to first aid and tire plugging kits...raingear?  Should these things matter whether it's a day's ride or something longer (it seems to me that if a tire plugging kit is necessary for a long ride that it would also be necessary for a day's ride).  I see some of you traveling with a SMALL tankbag for an entire weekend.  How is that possible?  What do you know that I don't.

I'm really tired of traveling with a HEAVILY loaded down bike wherever I go.  I need to lighten up...

So what are you guys packing for your different length of rides?  

« Last Edit: December 19, 2006, 10:45:01 PM by ksann » Logged

 Dr. Gil's Deluxe Website

 -John Steinbeck  "Yeah, I'
Daniel Kalal
It's pronounced Goot-see
*

Reputation 58
Offline Offline

Years Contributed: '07, '08, '09, '10
Years Supported: '11
Motorcycles: Guzzi Daytona, Guzzi Stelvio
GPS: Kansas
Miles Typed: 886

My Photo Gallery



WWW

Ignore
« Reply #1 on: December 19, 2006, 09:34:19 PM »

7 days changes seems too many.  Might drop down to 5 days worth (my usual for a 2 week trip--7 is my max).  A Roadcrafter has lots of pockets--use them for camera, maps, phone, ear plugs, food.  You are allowed one jacket, only, and it must serve for the Roadcrafter liner as well (polartech is your friend).  Pack first aid only for road rash and insects.  Heavier woolen shirts can be repeated over days.  No extra pants (you get what you have on).  Motorcycle Parts?  You'll never have what you need.  Security for the motorcycle? (are Guzzis ever stolen?).  Fewer days means the weather is better known--no need to cover the possible extremes.  Rain suit?  Not needed.  Consider not packing walking shoes (much as that can be nice).
Logged
Willie G
Cogito Ergo Zoom
*

Reputation 10
Offline Offline

Motorcycles: 2010 ZX 14
GPS: Parker, CO
Miles Typed: 166

My Photo Gallery





Ignore
« Reply #2 on: December 19, 2006, 09:40:52 PM »

Doc -

Were you happy with your life before you read the book?  If so, you are the victim of a self-induced neurosis caused by (or with the help of) an "officious intermeddler" a/k/a WOMAN.  GET OVER IT!                   Baaa

If the book merely gave voice to an inner longing for a lighter load, then change!      Bash



All this free therapy....I need another drink.   Beerchug
Logged

The whole point of enforcing motor vehicle safety regulations is to remove from the road the unlicensed driver before he demonstrates why he is unlicensed.   Delaware v. Prouse, 440 U.S. 648
forester
My money grows on trees.
*

Reputation -16
Offline Offline

Motorcycles: 2006 Suzuki DL650 V-strom
GPS: Cold side of conus
Miles Typed: 2686

My Photo Gallery


06' 'strom: world's bestest bike.




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: December 19, 2006, 09:56:56 PM »

Well for starters, winter riding will certainly require more luggage, because it requires more clothes.  However, you can make an enormous difference in the amount of room you need by choosing layers very carefully.  My opinion is that if you are planning a ride in a multitude of environments, you should be able to have one pair of pants/jacket that have liners and are waterproof, too.  Water is best carried via a camelbak, and 2l. should get you through half a day of riding easy - just fill it up when you need it.  Bike lock?  Isn't that built into your steering head/ign. key assembly?  A small digital camera with extra batteries (I rubber band each pair of extra batteries together, saving space by removing the packaging) will easily fit into the tank bag, as will the maps (in map pocket) and cell phone).  GPS is hard-wired in cradle and takes the same batteries as the camera.  Flashlight? I carry two, one key fob-style and another Petzl Tikka headlamp, which take AAAs, (again rubber banded).  Think compact.  Eliminate anything you do not absolutely need.  You cannot plan for everything, but if you can take something that you can use for a multitude of things, take it.  Crap, I've cut toothbrush handles in the past to save space/weight!  Lol

A medium sized tankbag and topcase are all I need for a week long bike camping trip w/fishing.  I don't take whiskey... I have an air compressor, patch and tool kit all under the seat of the 'strom (no luggage necessary).  A chain-oiler negates my need for a can of lube.  However, when I rode the other bikes w/o the auto oiler, I simply bought the smaller sized cans to take with and larger to leave in the garage.

There are all kinds of ways to save space without reducing your items effectiveness.

Logged

For a forester, EVERY day is Earth day.
               SCHADENFREUDE!. Beerchug
RenegadeVT
Crazy Woodchuck
*

Reputation 12
Offline Offline

Motorcycles: 2007 Triumph Tiger, 2000 SV650, 2010 Hypermotard 796
GPS: Vermont
Miles Typed: 906

My Photo Gallery


Iím not stubborn, I just know when Iím right




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: December 19, 2006, 10:13:27 PM »

Change of cloths  Headscratch who are you trying to impress!!  Smile

Logged

Don't argue with stupid people, they will bring you down to their level and then beat you with experience.

Some mistakes are too much fun to only make once.  I have lost my mind, if found handle
county
The thrill of speed, the image of danger
*

Reputation -630
Offline Offline

Motorcycles: Blackbird & F650CS
GPS: Memphis, TN
Miles Typed: 0

My Photo Gallery





Ignore
« Reply #5 on: December 20, 2006, 12:03:57 AM »

Most of my clothing I wear, it's gear.   That 7 days stuff is not what I do.  I carry 1 pair pants, 1 pair of shorts and 1 pair of shoes.  Something to get into after my shower.

Plus underwear and tshirts which are part of the riding gear.  And some tools, tire repair kit, rainsuit etc.

Emergency food?  What, you going outta range of civilization?  First aid kit?  That's being a pessimist.

Thermos of coffee...I carry that along with a coupla water bottles.  
Logged

Iron Butt Identification No. 22810.  BB1500   Bullet Bike rider
My dog can poo !
RonC
Junior Member
*

Reputation 10
Offline Offline

Miles Typed: 46

My Photo Gallery




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: December 20, 2006, 12:08:13 AM »

I pack about 3 days of shirts and pants. The only time the shirts and pants are worn are when I've washed up and I am going to dinner or if I plan to tour around an area for a day. Most of my day is spent in my motorcycle clothing. I will pack about 5 days of underwear, with plans to wash everything every four days or so.
I carry a well stocked emergency kit that has 'true' emergency equipment as well as aspirin, tylenol, anti-diarrheal and generic Pepto-bismol tablets. I don't take a whole bottle, but dump the bunch of the pills in a single medicine vial.
I have a foot pump and tire plug kit with all my tools. My tool kit has a Leatherman Wave with several screwdriver bits and sockets, the most commonly used wrenches for my bike, and an allen wrench set. There also are fuses, cable ties of various sizes, duct tape, and a flashlight. A disk lock is in there too.
I carry a waterproof pair of gloves as a spare in the summer and insulated ones in the winter. Rain gear goes in a side case. I've learned from ugly experience to carry a spare face shield and had to use the spare twice.
My camera goes in the tank bag. A water bladder goes in a bag on the pillion seat.
I'm sure I've forgotten to list some items. All my junk fits pretty comfortably in my FJR side cases and top case.
Last summer, I didn't carry diddly. My wife followed me to Montana in our Subaru wagon. Bigsmile
Ron
« Last Edit: December 20, 2006, 02:51:41 PM by RonC » Logged
Mrs. DantesDame
Super Moderator
*

Reputation 50
Offline Offline

Years Contributed: '07, '08, '09, '10
Years Supported: '11
Motorcycles: '09 Honda Transalp
GPS: Switzerland
Miles Typed: 14089

My Photo Gallery



WWW
« Reply #7 on: December 20, 2006, 12:16:01 AM »



Were you happy with your life before you read the book?  If so, you are the victim of a self-induced neurosis caused by (or with the help of) an "officious intermeddler" a/k/a WOMAN.  GET OVER IT!                   Baaa

 Bigsmile I think I have a new name!!!!

Doc - In no way did I intend for my book giving to cause you such angst... please put it back on the dresser and let it torment another STNer at another time...

As for packing: 7 days is WAAAAY too much! I usually pack for 2-3, depending on what I plan to do/see along the way. I don't fill up my side pannier with tools and parts. If you can't fix it with duct tape (ala VFR circa 2003) then it can't be fixed. One set of shoes in case you have to hike around and hunt down dinner because you left the emergency food rations at home too). One jacket (even summer evenings can get chilly), the Ultimate Toiletry Kit (I keep mine on a shelf in the bedroom, ready to go at a moment's notice :burnout" )  What else do you need? Especially if you're not camping...

Hey - here's an idea: WCRM IV Saturday Event: Interested parties can pull their bike up to the B&B&B&B and show other interested parties what/how they pack. Lots of neat tips could be gleaned from such a demonstration  Thumbsup
Logged

www.dantesdame.com  <--- Rides! Rides! Rides! Burnout  You don't know unless you ask. ***   Adventure: Adversity recounted at leisure.
Dr Gil
"Datsa notta noise, eetsa sound!"
*

Reputation 13
Offline Offline

Years Contributed: '06, '07, '08
Motorcycles: '02 Moto Guzzi Le Mans
GPS: Eureka, CA USA
Miles Typed: 1797

My Photo Gallery



WWW

Ignore
« Reply #8 on: December 20, 2006, 12:43:20 AM »

When I talk about "7 days" worth of clothing I am of course referring to those most delicate of garments...my socks.  Shirts (upper clothing) is second.  I pack 7 days worth of socks...they are always getting wet, etc.  I find it easy to wash them in the motel sink every other day but like to have lots in reserve.  It's old Army training.  Pants X2.  Shirts X4/5 (vary hot/cold stuff).  Undergarments...forgetaboutit.

But it's not just the clothing that "overpacks" me...it's the other necessary/unnecessary stuff.  What about that "tire repair" stuff that some riders seem to feel is important?  And what about that first aid kit?  Is this stuff worth packing...really?

What's important...REALLY and what's not?

...and don't trouble yourself about your gift starting this DD...it's been a long time comin' and needed to be addressed.
Logged

 Dr. Gil's Deluxe Website

 -John Steinbeck  "Yeah, I'
Johnny Monsoon
*

Reputation -116
Offline Offline

Years Contributed: '07
Miles Typed: 3621

My Photo Gallery




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: December 20, 2006, 02:23:26 AM »

I have struggled with this a lot when deploying.  Who knows where you'll break for a few days or what the weather will be like halfway around the world?

So, in that, I take pretty universal things.  I do a ton of winter dropp... errr... riding too.

So, I've found that the Gerbings removes lots of layers.  Aside from the overall comfort, that is worth it alone to buy heated gear.  Just a jacket and gloves are all I've ever found I needed.

That leaves me with appropriate clothing.  I figure a good pair of jeans, a button-down, and a decent pair of shoes go with me on trips.  I don't bother with any extra clothing (except maybe a sweater or something for when I'm off the bike).  I carry a few changes of underwear and socks, a couple long sleeved t-shirts, and that's about it.  I can always do laundry at a laundrymat or hotel, so no need to pack too much; and if I really desperately need that one piece of clothing... I'll go buy it on the road.

As for the other bike stuff:  I carry a small compressor in my bike's tail section.  Likewise for the basic tools (no need to get too crazy because you can't likely fix an actual broken part on the road without a replacement anyway;and you'll have to go to a shop for that).  I carry a plug kit, and a small LED flashlight.  I also carry a small can of Plexus (they make little tiny squirt bottles of it too) and a soft rag or two.  The emergency kit I wear or can field-find (more on this if you want to hear it).  That's about it.
Logged
Lawn Dart
I am BMW-K: I survived Christine's Wrath.
*

Reputation 45
Offline Offline

Years Contributed: '07, '09, '10
Years Supported: '11
Motorcycles: 2012 Ducati Monster EVO; 2011 Yamaha WR250R
GPS: Anaheim Hills, CA
Miles Typed: 4444

My Photo Gallery


- C'mon Iron Horse! Go faster! Go Faster!


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #10 on: December 20, 2006, 02:43:58 AM »

My travel kit:

Gear:
Helmet
leather 2 piece suit.
Riding Boots
Held gauntlets.

Under gear:
wicking under-shirt.  Long sleave.  
BMW ultralight fleece shirt (very thin).
e-Vest
Fleece jacket
non-cotton jockeys - boxer-brief style with no seams.
Thorlo synthetic hiking socks.

one piece rain suit (doubles as cold weather windbreaker/oversuit, packed into a compression stuffsack.)

Ok, now add the following:
1.  1x extra pair of underwear per day, +1 spare for "emergencies"
2.  1x pair of socks per day, +1 spare for emergencies.
3.  Thin Fleece pants or sweat pants (for lounging in a hotel room)
4.  1x T-Shirt per 3 days.
5.  Ball cap or beanie.
6.  Sandals or moccassins.
7.  Spare set of keys for bike & givi
8.  Small digital camera & charger
9.  Utlralight nylon windbreaker (very optional - depends on weather).
10. ultralight shorts (doubles as swim trunks)

(note above, I'm already packing a fleece jacket & the e-vest)

Toiletries:
1.  1x razor
2.  1x toothbrush
3.  1x small tube toothpaste.
4.  small pack of wet-wipes
5.  Vitamin packs (cuz Lord knows we eat so healthy on the road!)
6.  Reading materials

(Most hotels supply a bar of soap and shampoo.  So no worries here.)

Additional gear:
1.  First aid kit consisting of a dozen bandaids, a tube of chapstick, and a bottle of ibuprofin.
2.  Tool Kit #1  (appx 5x9x2" in size)
3.  Factory bike tool kit.  (4" tool roll.)
4.  Spares kit (extra fuses, bulbs, spare spark plug, and a spare H4 headlight)
5.  Airman compressor.
6.  Twin Max vacuum carb tool (recent addition)
7.  AA flashlight

Tool Kit #1:
1.  Mutli-Plier
2.  Multi-Meter
3.  20' of each red and green wire
4.  roll of electical tape  
5.  $20 in emergency cash
6.  2x 10" lengths of coathanger folded in half
7.  half a dozen spare earplug sets.
8.  small notepad & pen
9.  6x 6" zip ties
10. small tube di-electric grease
11. JB Weld
12. small "Pen Sized" flare gun kit (yep, you read that right.)
13. a few assorted metric bolts
14. blue-permatex.
15. roll of yellow bike-matched duct tape.

Factory tool kit:
1.  Full set of metric allen wrenches
2.  pliers
3.  8, 10, 12, 14mm box wrenches.
4.  sparkplug wrench.
5.  feeler guages for ABS sensor & valves
6.  double ended screwdriver
7.  flat repair kit w/ 3 12gr co2 cylinders
8.  tire iron


Anyways, yeah, that's what rides on my bike when I vacation.  BTW, all of this fits in ONE Givi V46 topcase.  I have 2x saddlebags (33 liter each) as needed.  I have a tankbag but didn't need it on the last trip.  And, as a total aside, yes, all the tools ride on the bike 24/7.  





« Last Edit: December 20, 2006, 12:06:32 PM by BMW-K » Logged

ATGATT 35:12-14
"And Atgatt courted Motgatt, and took her for a wife.
And lo, he compromised with Atgmott, and verily she conceived, and did bear a son, Notgatt. And Notgatt roamed naked, 
Orson
speshulize in havin' fun
*

Reputation 79
Offline Offline

Years Contributed: '09
Motorcycles: '00 Aprilia Mille, '02 Moto Guzzi Le Mans, '04 Triumph Thruxton
GPS: Dhahran, Saudi Arabia
Miles Typed: 13953

My Photo Gallery



WWW
« Reply #11 on: December 20, 2006, 03:05:42 AM »

1st aid kit = duct tape & restaurant napkins  Bigsmile
Logged

FJR-UK
Retired STNer
*

Reputation 15
Offline Offline

Motorcycles: 2010 FJR1300
GPS: SE London
Miles Typed: 578

My Photo Gallery





Ignore
« Reply #12 on: December 20, 2006, 05:08:57 AM »

I need to lighten up...

I'll say.

Our trip to Dubrovnik was 22 days. I get one pannier. Jo gets one pannier. The top box is for our rain suits and a backpack that carries footwear. We try to leave it half empty so we can carry luxury stuff like picnics. Most times, Jo's toiletry kit ends up in the top box, too.

A tank bag carries compass, maps, cap, glasses, earplugs, cellphone, camera bag and other valuables and documents that I don't want to leave on the bike. Frankly, it gets too heavy. I'd like to find a smaller bag that comes with a backpack harness.

Under the seat, I carry a CO2 tire repair kit, a modest tool kit, a rag, a spare bulb set (required by law in much of Europe) and a U-lock to attach our helmets to the bike.

Jo is responsible for her pannier, so I can't tell you how she manages to get fancy evening wear and jewelry in there along with everything else. It's black magic.

In my pannier, I take five changes of underwear, a length of rope and a few clothes pegs, and a travel-sized laundry detergent. The "first-aid" kit is part of my toiletry kit. Evening wear and day wear. It has to dry quickly and look okay without being ironed. A light jacket on the autumn trips. If it doesn't fit in my pannier, it gets left behind. You can always buy stuff on the road. This last trip, we also had shorts and swim suits. Everything got worn.

Jo discovered a packing tip: we put items in ziplock bags, like socks and underwear. You can press out all the excess air and things pack really compact, plus they slide in and out of the liner bags more easily.

So that's the two of us on one bike. I don't know how you can fill a whole pannier with maintenance gear!

I've never had to use the tire repair kit. Any roadside breakdown that I could fix, it did it with a spanner or screwdriver. All the other events required a mechanic: disintegrating front wheel bearing, total electrical failure, leaking hydraulic clutch seal. I haven't had a clutch cable or throttle cable break on me since 1968. I don't have to adjust a drive chain anymore, so I've also stopped carrying chain lube and WD40.

I prefer to make more room for enjoying the trip and less room for potential disasters.  Smile
Logged
5OUTTA6
Let's be safe out there
*

Reputation 10
Offline Offline

Years Contributed: '06, '09, '10
Motorcycles: KLR, DR650, CT90
GPS: Somewhere on Earth
Miles Typed: 579

My Photo Gallery





Ignore
« Reply #13 on: December 20, 2006, 05:44:20 AM »

One of the guys I rode to Utah with says he saves space (at least on the way back) by packing his underwear  with holes in them.  Then he just throws them away when he changes them.....

I've found you can't beat a pair of backpacking (nylon?) pants which turns into shorts with the flick of the zippers. They are light and dry out very quickly if you need to wash them.
Logged
pushrod
Reformed Harley Rider
*

Reputation 10
Offline Offline

GPS: Soggytown, OR
Miles Typed: 180

My Photo Gallery




Ignore
« Reply #14 on: December 20, 2006, 07:54:12 AM »

Dokta,
I haven't seen the pannier setup you have for the goose, but it sounds like you have ALOT of room for stuff. How to pick the fly poop out of the pepper (whats needed/not)? Have you ever gone backpacking? Your connundrum is partially from having the room to begin with. Perhaps try some weekenders where you have only the equivalent of a tankbag or tank & tailbag. You'll find it clarifies your thinking about what the essentials are. My Idaho/Montana trip was only 3 days, but done w/ only tankbag. That was camping (oh the humanity) one night, hotel the other.
Logged

'02 Sportster 1200, '03 Dyna Sport, '05 Gix 1K
joema
Junior Member
*

Reputation 10
Offline Offline

Motorcycles: 2009 CBR1000RR
GPS: Nashville, TN
Miles Typed: 105

My Photo Gallery





Ignore
« Reply #15 on: December 20, 2006, 08:43:44 AM »


...winter riding will certainly require more luggage, because it requires more clothes.  However, you can make an enormous difference in the amount of room you need by choosing layers very carefully...


For long winter trips, using an electric vest or jacket liner can save a lot of clothing layers. When the ambient temp "warms" up (say to 55F), you simply turn it down. When it gets colder, you turn it up. No need to stop and change layers, no need to allocate storage for the layers you shed.

Likewise adding heated grips may in some cases avoid having multiple sets of gloves. I've ridden in 25F using unlined leather gloves, with my heated grips on high.

Your alternator is generally producing a lot of excess power, why not use it beneficially rather than consume precious storage space for conventional layered clothing. Just a possible suggestion.
Logged
RickC1957
Your friendly Crazy Canuk
*

Reputation 9
Offline Offline

Motorcycles: 2005 Ducati ST3, 2005 Ducati 620 Monster
GPS: Barrington, Illinois
Miles Typed: 1479

My Photo Gallery





Ignore
« Reply #16 on: December 20, 2006, 09:08:56 AM »

 Lol Boy you guys overpack...I packed for 11 day trip...had all my tools, including breaker bar, compressor, laptop, pillow, all the usually resident stuff in my tank bag, heated vest, rain gear (2 sets), cool vest, camera equipment (not that I ever use the thing) and maps...all of my gear fit into my tank bag, side cases and top case...and I still had room enough to buy souvenirs on the trip.
Logged

Let's waste time chasing cars.
goodhawk
Junior Member
*

Reputation 10
Offline Offline

Miles Typed: 539

My Photo Gallery




Ignore
« Reply #17 on: December 20, 2006, 09:47:01 AM »

OK - fer my travels ( longest was 1 month - LA to Olympia to Tetons to Minneap. to Jersey) - 2 saddlebags, med. size + small backpack, kept on pillion seat ( somehow, carrying backpack wile riding stresses shoulders a LOT more than hiking.
In backpack - the need quick stuff - rainsuit ( 2 piece. also works as windbreak for warmth) elec. vest, winter gloves, camera, sm. 2 - AA flashlight , med. size vicegrips, 2 screwdrivers, waterparoof matches in sm plastic bag.
clothes - - I ride with a flow thru jacket, draggin jeans. in pack - 2 nd draggin jeans ( one set aerost. pads, switch back and forth)
2 tee shirts, 2 tennis shirts, fleese jacket
2 0r 3  pr socks, couple undies  ( buy and toss old on long trips)
sweatpants, 2nd sweatshirt ( I hate cold. camp wear), leather bottom slippers for camp.
full service manual. spare set eyeglasses.
small set of combo wrenches, allen keys,  large flat screwdriver, CO 2 air kit,'sticky rope' flat kit, 2 nd flashlight, new batteries. 1/ 2 roll elec. tape, 2 ft elect. wire, 10 ft nylon cord.
sleep. bag ( 45 deg. if it's cold miserable, hotel) usually I alternate, 1 nt tent, 1 nt hotel.
couple books on area hikes, good rides, etc
small plastic box (kitchen type) with sm. toothpaste, couple 3 x4" bandages, 2 ft roll elastic , small tube antiseptic,  small bottle aspirin, matches
kept in seperate strong bag, bungee neted above sidebag  ( actually 4 bungee nets, 2 side by side taped togeather, double layer.) - tent, 3 /4 length air mattress plus a 24 " square roll of 3 /4 foam ( I don't usually cook at campsite, no fuel or stove.)
note - everything is kept in plastic bags, grocery store type
guess that's about it.
edit - forgot - 2 pr hiking shorts.



« Last Edit: December 20, 2006, 09:49:10 AM by goodhawk » Logged
torags v2
*

Reputation 10
Offline Offline

Motorcycles: '04 BMW R1150RS, '07 XR883
GPS: San Francisco
Miles Typed: 945

My Photo Gallery


IBA #17225




Ignore
« Reply #18 on: December 20, 2006, 10:40:02 AM »


 Lol Boy you guys overpack...I packed for 11 day trip...had all my tools, including breaker bar, compressor, laptop, pillow, all the usually resident stuff in my tank bag, heated vest, rain gear (2 sets), cool vest, camera equipment (not that I ever use the thing) and maps...all of my gear fit into my tank bag, side cases and top case...and I still had room enough to buy souvenirs on the trip.


Hey Rick, when you stopped to gas up, did you find that you drew flies?

I'm kidding...

I only pack 3 days of underwear - the forth day is washer day - somewhere , anywhere... during a lunch/dinner break. I take extra nutrition like Optima diet shake in case I can't find decent food along the way or I need a quick leg.

I like the security of tools n flat repair (incl compressor). Recently I had a flat and it's importance was brought home.


Logged

Rags
prshguy
Lost but making gr8 time.
*

Reputation 10
Offline Offline

GPS: Sacramento, CA
Miles Typed: 198

My Photo Gallery


07 Norge (the faster red one)




Ignore
« Reply #19 on: December 20, 2006, 11:35:12 AM »

After being stranded without a tire repair kit I've found it to be an absolute basic for me, no matter what else happens, cold, rain etc, I want to be able to keep moving, not sit by the roadside in the middle of nowhere.  In a test comparison, this plugger: http://www.stopngo.com/plugger.asp
was the best, bar none. To this I add a very small 12v electric compressor, and if needed, disassemble the compressor from the plastic housing so it is just the bare motor and hose.

Quick tip:  don't fold your clothing, roll it tightly, everything, even the undies.  This compresses the item better to save space.
Logged

Roger
Pages: [1] 2  All   Go Up
Print
Jump to:  



ST.N

Copyright © 2001 - 2013 Sport-Touring.Net.
All rights reserved.

SimplePortal 2.3.1 © 2008-2009, SimplePortal