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Topic: best years for purchase SV650s/SV1000s  (Read 8314 times)

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howard richman
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« on: October 28, 2007, 07:12:01 PM »

I'm researchng the many rides out there comming off a BMW K1200GT. The bike is way too heavy for my solo riding. I'm not touring, doing backroads and some hiway. I'v got much experience riding, but usually ride w/ the slower crowd. I've 1st demoed a Kaw650R, and was very fun w/upright bar positioning, little small, The DL650/1000(Vstroms); not my liking.  I've been directed to the SV 650s/1000s, but not thier bar positioning. The only option to get a much higher bar position is the convertabars or similar to have more choices of bikes. Which years SV650s/SV1000S should I be looking for.( recalls/improvements/pricing)?

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« Reply #1 on: October 28, 2007, 07:35:15 PM »

The only recall I can think of was a recall for something to do with the fuel tank on the fuel injected SV650's (2003 to present).

You have a few options for changing the clipons on the "S" models. Convertibars, Helibars or replacing the clipons entirely with handlebars. To convert to handlebars, you can buy a kit from LSL or search SVrider.com where there are several threads about the conversion. You might need longer cables and brake lines with the handlbars.

SVrider.com is the best source for anything and everything to do with both versions of the SV.

A brief (but incomplete) overview would be:
SV650(s):  1999-2002: carbureted with attractive tube frame.
               2003 - present: new frame, preload adjustment in front fork, fuel injection, aluminum frame. Frame is black from 2005 to present.

SV1000s:   2003 - present: fully adjustable suspension, Fuel injection, aluminum frame.
               2005 - present: frame is black and several upgrades including, bigger valves, higher compression and slipper clutch.

All are great, fun bikes with good aftermarket support and a reputation for being very reliable. IMO, the SV1000s is one of the most underrated bikes on the market.
                
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« Reply #2 on: October 28, 2007, 07:46:08 PM »


The only recall I can think of was a recall for something to do with the fuel tank on the fuel injected SV650's (2003 to present).

A brief (but incomplete) overview would be:
SV650(s):  1999-2002: carbureted with attractive tube frame.
               2003 - present: new frame, preload adjustment in front fork, fuel injection, aluminum frame. Frame is black from 2005 to present.

SV1000s:   2003 - present: fully adjustable suspension, Fuel injection, aluminum frame.
               2005 - present: frame is black and several upgrades including, bigger valves, higher compression and slipper clutch.

All are great, fun bikes with good aftermarket support and a reputation for being very reliable. IMO, the SV1000s is one of the most underrated bikes on the market.
                


If you really want to get techincal, 2002 650's had preload adjustable forks as well. Also, I think in 04, the 650 got a narrower radiator to help keep it from getting screwed in a tipover.

The SV1k, I don't think got bigger valves in 05 (i could be wrong), but got bigger throttle boddies (I know I'm right) in 05. Also, the 2003 SV1K S model is kind of a bastard bike due to subframe changes in 04. If you want exhaust for a 03 SV1KS, it MUST BE for a 03 SV1KS. A 03 naked will not work, and a 04 up 1KS (all SV1K's from 04 up are S models) will not work. On the other hand, 03 nakeds, ALL year exhausts will work. I THINK this also applies to the 03 650 (naked or not), but am not 100 percent sure.

The "slipper clutch" is NOT a true slipper clutch. Suzuki calls it something like a "back torque limiting" clutch or some shit. It reduces wheel slippage on downshifts, but definately will not eliminate it. Bang a couple downshifts from redline, and you'll think someone dropped a brick on the rear brake. I'm pretty sure it was included in ALL year 1k's as well.

The tank recall on the SV's from 03 to present is limited to California bikes only. There's a problem where they'll leak fuel. I THINK it's actually limited from 03 - 05 or 06.

If you're looking at the 1k, I'd go for the 05 and up just because of the revised stuff. In all honesty though, it doesn't seem to make that big of a difference from the dyno graphs I've seen.
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« Reply #3 on: October 28, 2007, 08:01:52 PM »

I'm glad a I tossed the word "incomplete" in my post.   Lol

Great info TRaGIK.  Thumbsup  (You'll note I stayed away from aftermarket hard case discussions involving a particular Italian supplier.)
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« Reply #4 on: October 28, 2007, 08:06:08 PM »


I'm glad a I tossed the word "incomplete" in my post.   Lol

Great info TRaGIK.  Thumbsup  (You'll note I stayed away from aftermarket hard case discussions involving a particular Italian supplier.)


Oops. Didn't notice the incomplete word you threw in there. Bigsmile

And I'll gladly educate anyone on what I think of Givi as well....as well as give them a long list of alternative luggage options.  Lol
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« Reply #5 on: October 28, 2007, 10:09:35 PM »


The only recall I can think of was a recall for something to do with the fuel tank on the fuel injected SV650's (2003 to present).

You have a few options for changing the clipons on the "S" models. Convertibars, Helibars or replacing the clipons entirely with handlebars. To convert to handlebars, you can buy a kit from LSL or search SVrider.com where there are several threads about the conversion. You might need longer cables and brake lines with the handlbars.

SVrider.com is the best source for anything and everything to do with both versions of the SV.

A brief (but incomplete) overview would be:
SV650(s):  1999-2002: carbureted with attractive tube frame.
               2003 - present: new frame, preload adjustment in front fork, fuel injection, aluminum frame. Frame is black from 2005 to present.

SV1000s:   2003 - present: fully adjustable suspension, Fuel injection, aluminum frame.
               2005 - present: frame is black and several upgrades including, bigger valves, higher compression and slipper clutch.

All are great, fun bikes with good aftermarket support and a reputation for being very reliable. IMO, the SV1000s is one of the most underrated bikes on the market.
                


Thanks for great info; looks like SV1000S may be under some research. I'm leaning towards the 1000. How's the best way to describe the differences of the 650 to the 1000. I do have much riding experience, but want a good road bike ,not a racer. As I said the 650S seemed slightly small. I'm 50yrs. 5'9" 175lbs.

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« Reply #6 on: October 29, 2007, 03:46:04 AM »

Hey Howie......I'm a Howie as well... Bigok
I had an '04 SV650 naked-GREAT bike.  Just picked up a naked '03 SV1000 w/12K mi (only year in US that the naked is available).  I prefer the naked handlebar riding position to the "S" clip-ons.  To me the 1000 seems only "slightly" larger thand 650 but the 1000 has a LOT more grunt!  To me it feels like it has substantially more power and it handles well.  I haven't had my 1000 long but I'm super happy with it so far.  Sounds to me like you'd be a good candidate for an '03 SV1000 naked as well.  Have you ridden the BMW F800ST?  I did.  It's light, comfortable and pretty fast as well....it has a handlebar rather than clip-ons and I think you'd like it.  I would have gone for one but my SV was like 1/3 the price and is faster......so I got the SV.

Good luck.

-Howie

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« Reply #7 on: October 29, 2007, 08:20:43 AM »

the '03 was the first year of fuel injection on the SV-650.  Some parts for the '03 SV 650 only fit that year but the 04-07 650 share parts OK.

I just bought an '04 SV-650s and its a great bike but I will probably get the Helibars for it since the handlebar position is a little extreme for me.  

Otherwise, its a hoot to ride and MUCH lighter and more nimble than my '05 FJR>
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rauchman
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« Reply #8 on: October 29, 2007, 09:55:16 AM »

Hi,

I started on a brand new SV650S in silver 2002 (last year of the 1st gen) and loved it.  I personally like the looks of the 1st gen better, but that's all preference.  I've been so close to pulling the trigger on an SV1K a few times.  There are deals that come up a lot for these bikes since they don't sell well.  The one thing that keeps stopping me is the limited tank range.  From everything I've read, you're looking at an average of around 120 miles to the reserve light (slightly less if more aggressive, slighty better if more conservative).  If that works for you...great.  For me, it's definitely a limiting factor.  Also for 2007, they changed the look of the tach.  Looks much better IMHO.  Other gripes you'll run into on this bike are that the suspension and brakes are so/so.  I've never ridden one, so have no comment, but don't go looking for current sportbike level suspension and brakes.  Also, the 2003's have been known to have a "knock" from the engine.  Not all, but it comes up frequently.  The 2003 SV1KS's have a 20mm higher subframe than the "N"'s of the same year and all going forward.  If I were looking at one of these bikes, I'd be going for a 2005+.  As Tragik mentioned, there were a bunch of small revisions on the 2005's.  20% lighter flywheel and other engine mods, supposed to be 3% better HP.  Most 2003/4 dynos I've seen on stock SV1KS got about 102-108hp/67-72 torque.  2005's +, again from the dynos I've seen, go 104-113hp/ 69-73 ft lbs.  Not much difference.  I do think it is a sleeper of bike, but for me, the tank range is a deal breaker.

Edited to ad, from everything I've seen 2007 is the last year of the SV1KS.
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« Reply #9 on: October 29, 2007, 11:50:04 AM »

I've asked before why the SV has a 'not so good suspension'.  It's got suspenders adjustable for preload and both compression and rebound damping at both ends.  What's wrong with it?  The answers are usually something like 'It's not an Ohlins' and 'You've got to set it up for your weight'.  No kidding.  There's nothing wrong with an SV's suspenders.  You might (or might not) need to respring it for your weight.  How is that different from any other bike?  
I've never heard anyone complain about the brakes.
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« Reply #10 on: October 29, 2007, 12:33:04 PM »

The only people that really complain about the brakes or suspension, are the magiziness. Everyone else is repeating what they've read. The mags for whatever reason slammed the SV (I'm talking about the 1000 only here) every chance they got, and it's mostly bullshit.

I weigh ~210 pounds, and the suspension suits me fine...even with the extra weight in the luggage. If you're doing track days a LOT, or can spank Rossi on your favorite mountain road, then yeah, you might need to upgrade the suspension. Otherwise, ignore what you've heard. The forks might be undersprung, but even so, they suit me fine.

The brakes stop plenty good as well. They were plenty good on older GSXR's, and they're plenty good on the SV1k. It's got good feel, and good stopping power. Brembo good? No, but they're not Brembo's.

My 1k dyno'd 106hp and 65 ft pounds on a dyno that supposedly reads low. Plenty enough hp and torque for me.

Tank range on my 1k when it was stock was 135 - 140 miles before the low fuel light came on (leaving approx 1.4 gallons in reserve). When I added the luggage, it dropped to 132 - 137 miles. When I geared it -1 on the front sprocket, it dropped to 120 - 125 before the low fuel light on. The absolute worst its ever given me is about 95 miles and the low fuel light came on, but I was running the bike pretty agressive in the mountains.

What's the best way to describe the differences between the 650 and the 1k? Well, I've owned both and that's an easy question to answer in one word. Better. EVERYTHING on the 1k is just plain better. Better suspension, better brakes, better power. The only "downside" to the 1k, is it weighs about 60 pounds more than the 650. Noticable? Yeah, but I've gotten used to it. SV1k weighs in at 485 pounds wet, where as the 650 is about 425.
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« Reply #11 on: October 29, 2007, 12:33:19 PM »


I've asked before why the SV has a 'not so good suspension'.  It's got suspenders adjustable for preload and both compression and rebound damping at both ends.  What's wrong with it?  The answers are usually something like 'It's not an Ohlins' and 'You've got to set it up for your weight'.  No kidding.  There's nothing wrong with an SV's suspenders.  You might (or might not) need to respring it for your weight.  How is that different from any other bike?  
I've never heard anyone complain about the brakes.


It's because #1 it's just damper rod forks which are cheap to begin with but they're also undersprung for someone like me for instance who weighs 200lbs (they're more suited for a 160lb rider)  Lean hard into a corner and you can feel the front forks wallow.  The front end will also dive when the the front brakes are applied.  You can't "adjust" your way out of that if you're a heavier rider.  You need different springs.
Heavier springs ordered for your weight (ohlins, racetech) with heavier oil makes a noticeable difference.  I made that change on my SV650 when I had it.  Of course cartridges and valves and an aftermarket rear shock is even better.  
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« Reply #12 on: October 29, 2007, 01:13:32 PM »

The SV1K does not have damper-rod forks, it's got cartridge forks.  And, once again, you're repeating that it's NFG 'cause it's not sprung for me.  
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« Reply #13 on: October 29, 2007, 01:30:12 PM »


The only people that really complain about the brakes or suspension, are the magiziness. Everyone else is repeating what they've read. The mags for whatever reason slammed the SV (I'm talking about the 1000 only here) every chance they got, and it's mostly bullshit.

I weigh ~210 pounds, and the suspension suits me fine...even with the extra weight in the luggage. If you're doing track days a LOT, or can spank Rossi on your favorite mountain road, then yeah, you might need to upgrade the suspension. Otherwise, ignore what you've heard. The forks might be undersprung, but even so, they suit me fine.

The brakes stop plenty good as well. They were plenty good on older GSXR's, and they're plenty good on the SV1k. It's got good feel, and good stopping power. Brembo good? No, but they're not Brembo's.

My 1k dyno'd 106hp and 65 ft pounds on a dyno that supposedly reads low. Plenty enough hp and torque for me.

Tank range on my 1k when it was stock was 135 - 140 miles before the low fuel light came on (leaving approx 1.4 gallons in reserve). When I added the luggage, it dropped to 132 - 137 miles. When I geared it -1 on the front sprocket, it dropped to 120 - 125 before the low fuel light on. The absolute worst its ever given me is about 95 miles and the low fuel light came on, but I was running the bike pretty agressive in the mountains.

What's the best way to describe the differences between the 650 and the 1k? Well, I've owned both and that's an easy question to answer in one word. Better. EVERYTHING on the 1k is just plain better. Better suspension, better brakes, better power. The only "downside" to the 1k, is it weighs about 60 pounds more than the 650. Noticable? Yeah, but I've gotten used to it. SV1k weighs in at 485 pounds wet, where as the 650 is about 425.


 Well; The downside for me is the fuel range. still researching...
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« Reply #14 on: October 29, 2007, 02:08:34 PM »


The only people that really complain about the brakes or suspension, are the magiziness. Everyone else is repeating what they've read. The mags for whatever reason slammed the SV (I'm talking about the 1000 only here) every chance they got, and it's mostly bullshit.

I weigh ~210 pounds, and the suspension suits me fine...even with the extra weight in the luggage. If you're doing track days a LOT, or can spank Rossi on your favorite mountain road, then yeah, you might need to upgrade the suspension. Otherwise, ignore what you've heard. The forks might be undersprung, but even so, they suit me fine.

The brakes stop plenty good as well. They were plenty good on older GSXR's, and they're plenty good on the SV1k. It's got good feel, and good stopping power. Brembo good? No, but they're not Brembo's.

My 1k dyno'd 106hp and 65 ft pounds on a dyno that supposedly reads low. Plenty enough hp and torque for me.

Tank range on my 1k when it was stock was 135 - 140 miles before the low fuel light came on (leaving approx 1.4 gallons in reserve). When I added the luggage, it dropped to 132 - 137 miles. When I geared it -1 on the front sprocket, it dropped to 120 - 125 before the low fuel light on. The absolute worst its ever given me is about 95 miles and the low fuel light came on, but I was running the bike pretty agressive in the mountains.

What's the best way to describe the differences between the 650 and the 1k? Well, I've owned both and that's an easy question to answer in one word. Better. EVERYTHING on the 1k is just plain better. Better suspension, better brakes, better power. The only "downside" to the 1k, is it weighs about 60 pounds more than the 650. Noticable? Yeah, but I've gotten used to it. SV1k weighs in at 485 pounds wet, where as the 650 is about 425.


Count me in the group reguritating what has been written by the bike mags.  But, like I said, I don't believe the brakes/suspension are up to current sport bike standards.  Don't get wrong, I LIKE the SV1K/S.  Also, I'm sure the brakes/suspension could be easily lived with as a road bike.  The deal breaker for me is the limited tank range.  I'm used to getting 200+ miles on a tank from the Roadstar I'm currently riding.  Getting down to 65% of that doesn't work for me.  I've come so close to buying an SV1K/S over the last few years.  At least 4 times I had it in my head that I was getting the big SV, but again, the limiting tank range is a deal breaker for me.  If a person can live with that, the SV would probably make a great bike.
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« Reply #15 on: October 29, 2007, 02:23:47 PM »


But, like I said, I don't believe the brakes/suspension are up to current sport bike standards.  


Well, true, I guess.  What else is?  

Won't argue with you regarding fuel range.
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« Reply #16 on: October 29, 2007, 02:54:38 PM »


The SV1K does not have damper-rod forks, it's got cartridge forks.  And, once again, you're repeating that it's NFG 'cause it's not sprung for me.  


Was referring to the 650...which I don't believe has cartridge forks.
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« Reply #17 on: October 29, 2007, 03:03:41 PM »



 But, like I said, I don't believe the brakes/suspension are up to current sport bike standards.


Maybe not, but is the 919, FZ1, or Z1000? I could be wrong, but I don't think they have it either. The SV1k was never marketed as a full on sportbike...it unfortunately, just has the ergo's of one.

The limited tank range does suck sometimes...but honestly, after 125 miles, I'm ready to get off the bike anyway. The only time I'd ever wish for more range is when gas stations are sparse.
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« Reply #18 on: October 29, 2007, 03:29:54 PM »




Maybe not, but is the 919, FZ1, or Z1000? I could be wrong, but I don't think they have it either. The SV1k was never marketed as a full on sportbike...it unfortunately, just has the ergo's of one.

The limited tank range does suck sometimes...but honestly, after 125 miles, I'm ready to get off the bike anyway. The only time I'd ever wish for more range is when gas stations are sparse.


 Do any here consider the DL 600/1000(Vstroms)? They have a great tank capacity, and comfort. What are the pro's and cons of these models?  If not I'de consider my 1st choice which was the Kaw 650R. a bit small; but a lot of fun and 150-170+ mls per tank.
                                          
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« Reply #19 on: October 29, 2007, 05:20:55 PM »




 Do any here consider the DL 600/1000(Vstroms)? They have a great tank capacity, and comfort. What are the pro's and cons of these models?
                                          


I've only ridden the DL650 strom (not the 1000).
Pros-comfortable...much more comfortable than an SV650 if you like do some distance (and if you like to sit bolt upright), great engine, super easy to ride, super reliable from all I've read, easy to attach luggage, great mpg and good range, awesome headlight, superb value (even better if you buy used)

Cons-some get bad buffeting at 70 or above with stock windshield (I noticed it a little bit), they sit tall (1000 even taller), higher center of gravity....some more buffetting and cross winds are felt more, quick but not FAST....if you want more kick in the pants power...the 1000 is better.

I think you should ride both but I really though the DL650 was a fabulous bike when I rode it.  I just can't really sit that upright or don't prefer to.
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