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Topic: new to dual sporting - WR250R, XR650L, DRZ400S/E, DR650... KLR650???  (Read 48328 times)

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« Reply #60 on: March 04, 2008, 12:08:26 AM »




+1 Didn't sound verbose to me.

Yea, wasn't sure what the deal was with all that.  Headscratch


Well, let's see, exceptionally long, unnecessarily wordy, and not even responsive to the question asked.  I'd say that pretty well fits the definition of verbose.   Rolleyes [shrugs]

Anyhow, back on topic....
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« Reply #61 on: March 04, 2008, 03:45:46 AM »

I own an XR650L and I used to own a KLR650.  I've never ridden the V2.0 KLR.  Mine was the V1.0 produced from 1153 until 2007.  The XRL and KLR are opposite ends of the spectrum.  The KLR is much better on the street.  The XRL is much better in the dirt.

I think you would be happy on the XRL.  Mine will go nearly anywhere.  The stock gas tank is way too small.  Throw away the smog pump and do "Dave's carb mods".  The seat height might scare you.  I'm 5'11" and can't put both heels down.  Except for that it is a really friendly street legal dirt bike.  It is twitchy at highway speeds on pavement, the engine vibrates some, and it hates gusty winds.  Pretty decent around town, though.  Eye level is right at the roof line on a Ford Explorer.
I've put a cheap luggage rack and JCWhitney givi copy on mine.  The 4.7 gallon Clarke tank is waiting for me to install it.
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« Reply #62 on: March 04, 2008, 08:13:59 AM »




Well, let's see, exceptionally long, unnecessarily wordy, and not even responsive to the question asked.  I'd say that pretty well fits the definition of verbose.   Rolleyes [shrugs]

Anyhow, back on topic....


You know, I had something very... verbose written here.  However, I'll get right to the point.  Those are pretty stiff words from someone who hasn't contributed anything about bikes at all to this thread.  I doubt the OP is getting much motorcycle information out of you attacking my postings.

I've addressed his issues, and explained some things that may not have occurred to him otherwise.  I'm confident he can sort it all out. Wink
« Last Edit: March 04, 2008, 08:36:53 AM by Johnny Monsoon » Logged
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« Reply #63 on: March 04, 2008, 09:18:18 AM »


I own an XR650L and I used to own a KLR650.  I've never ridden the V2.0 KLR.  Mine was the V1.0 produced from 1153 until 2007.  The XRL and KLR are opposite ends of the spectrum.  The KLR is much better on the street.  The XRL is much better in the dirt.

I think you would be happy on the XRL.  Mine will go nearly anywhere.  The stock gas tank is way too small.  Throw away the smog pump and do "Dave's carb mods".  The seat height might scare you.  I'm 5'11" and can't put both heels down.  Except for that it is a really friendly street legal dirt bike.  It is twitchy at highway speeds on pavement, the engine vibrates some, and it hates gusty winds.  Pretty decent around town, though.  Eye level is right at the roof line on a Ford Explorer.
I've put a cheap luggage rack and JCWhitney givi copy on mine.  The 4.7 gallon Clarke tank is waiting for me to install it.



I'm thinking along those lines - the DRZ and the 650L seem to be the most dirt-able of the bikes listed; and the 650, from what I hear, is a little easier to live with on longer occasional highway trips than the Z..  We'll see what pops up when I have the cashola, thanks for the input!
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« Reply #64 on: March 05, 2008, 02:20:30 AM »

I don't think the 650L has changed since '93 when it was introduced.  Find an older one that fits your budget if you can handle the seat height and highway manners.
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« Reply #65 on: March 10, 2008, 10:09:56 PM »

I've just been perusing the Beemer F650 and F800s and I do like what I see. A test drive will convince me ( along with more time to see how the 800 holds up) one way or the other but I am starting to harbour thoughts of dumping both my present bikes for one of those. Maybe next winter. Maybe not.
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« Reply #66 on: March 10, 2008, 10:41:26 PM »


I've just been perusing the Beemer F650 and F800s and I do like what I see. A test drive will convince me ( along with more time to see how the 800 holds up) one way or the other but I am starting to harbour thoughts of dumping both my present bikes for one of those. Maybe next winter. Maybe not.


Just make sure you aren't expecting either of those to be a dirtbike in the pure sense of motocrossing.  They're on the other side of the KLR, being more street-oriented yet.  That isn't a bad thing at all.  For some longer distance riding in unpaved, but graded roadways and mild trails, these bikes really excel.

I love the F800GS; I'd happily put one in my stable if I had the funds to do so.  It'd be difficult for me to find a bike that checked all my boxes for my current needs for a commuter bike.  Excellent concept; I hope it proves as well in the real world as it does on paper.
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« Reply #67 on: March 11, 2008, 05:47:12 PM »

At this late stage in my life I think I'll be sticking to the dirt roads as opposed to the single tracks. Tried one the other day on the KLR, bumping over (and getting stuck on) 2ft. logs and decided it was just too much work for this fat old fart. Ya, logging roads are fine. And for that, the Beemer might be the Kats' pajamas.
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« Reply #68 on: March 11, 2008, 09:09:23 PM »


At this late stage in my life I think I'll be sticking to the dirt roads as opposed to the single tracks. Tried one the other day on the KLR, bumping over (and getting stuck on) 2ft. logs and decided it was just too much work for this fat old fart. Ya, logging roads are fine. And for that, the Beemer might be the Kats' pajamas.


You kind of illustrate a great point though:  With a bigger, heavier, lower-powered bike, that stuff IS work.  With a light bike that has the power it really needs, and great suspension, it becomes play.  It really is a matter of using the right tool for the right job.

What I've found is that there are some bikes that have a broader 'job' spectrum; the XRR, the KTMs, Huskies... they all make that 'job' a lot more fun with MUCH less work, and also work pretty darned well on the highway (the former the worst of the three).  If you're just doing gravel roads in-between your road duty though, the WeeStrom, F800GS would do you really well.  That extra cylinder certainly makes long distance mule-packing much better.
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« Reply #69 on: March 12, 2008, 09:52:18 PM »

Get an XR650L.
They're cheap, reliable, and will go anywhere.
Continuous production of the exact same bike since the early 90's, so you know it's got to be an awfully good design, not some flash in the pan trendy marketing exercise.
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« Reply #70 on: March 13, 2008, 02:52:19 AM »



Continuous production of the exact same bike since the early 90's, so you know it's got to be an awfully good design, not some flash in the pan trendy marketing exercise.


Same with the KTM LC4.
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« Reply #71 on: March 13, 2008, 06:02:33 PM »




Same with the KTM LC4.


 Wink
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« Reply #72 on: March 13, 2008, 11:25:16 PM »


 Wink


The LC4 has been around since 1987. It did get an upgrade in 2003 with an extra oil pump and higher flow head...and obviuosly now it's a 690 with FI.
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« Reply #73 on: March 14, 2008, 08:31:48 AM »




The LC4 has been around since 1987. It did get an upgrade in 2003 with an extra oil pump and higher flow head...and obviuosly now it's a 690 with FI.


Most of the 'popular' DS bikes have designs dating back over a decade.  I suspect that the main reason for that is simply that the market demand for these bikes was so small.  Now it seems to be emerging the same way the auto industry did with trucks in the mid '80s.  Trucks today look nothing like trucks produced before then, and likewise, I'm seeing a lot of advances in this particular niche.  Of course, I am far more aware of the changes in these bikes than I ever was 5 years ago...
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« Reply #74 on: March 23, 2008, 09:00:16 PM »

I don't know if the original poster has made a purchase yet, but perhaps I can add some input on a bike mentioned in this thread.  The Kawasaki KLX250.  

I have one and like it for its light weight, suspension, road legal status, and unintimidating nature.  But it really struggles to get to and maintain road speeds.  55 MPH on the level in a bit of a head wind is all mine has to offer -- maybe 65 MPH going downhill with a tail wind.

I plan to fiddle with the carb and airbox at some point to get a bit more out of that motor.  But as it is, I wouldn't spend long on a real road with it.  Which is probably for the best because the brakes really suck.

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« Reply #75 on: March 30, 2008, 07:41:42 AM »


I don't know if the original poster has made a purchase yet, but perhaps I can add some input on a bike mentioned in this thread.  The Kawasaki KLX250.  

I have one and like it for its light weight, suspension, road legal status, and unintimidating nature.  But it really struggles to get to and maintain road speeds.  55 MPH on the level in a bit of a head wind is all mine has to offer -- maybe 65 MPH going downhill with a tail wind.

I plan to fiddle with the carb and airbox at some point to get a bit more out of that motor.  But as it is, I wouldn't spend long on a real road with it.  Which is probably for the best because the brakes really suck.




You have a lemon.  I could easily get the KLX up to 80; beyond that it takes a good while and a tail wind.  Brakes?  Excellent!  Good sized rotors for any offroad bike, and superior than most for its weight.  A braided line would help though, as with most any bike.
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« Reply #76 on: March 30, 2008, 08:24:44 PM »

The only way my KLX would have gone 80 is if you threw it out of an airplane. I don't think his was a lemon, I think the one you rode was magical.
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« Reply #77 on: March 30, 2008, 10:08:42 PM »


The only way my KLX would have gone 80 is if you threw it out of an airplane. I don't think his was a lemon, I think the one you rode was magical.


:popcorn:
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« Reply #78 on: March 30, 2008, 10:53:08 PM »

Coulda been, I guess.  Bone stock from Power Sports Pro in Omaha, NE.  It took a while to get to 80, but it'd do it all day long (and did).  No doubt the weight of the rider and terrain will greatly impact the little 250.  Clearly lighter guys on flatter land will be better.

Still, you just have to concede at some point that the KLX isn't a highway bike; no DS is really truly at home in that environment.  Some do better than others, but I've found that at legal speeds, the KLX is fine.  Better than most of the other offerings in the dirt; especially at its pricepoint offroad.  Better than several on the road; the low displacement limits top-end speeds, but also greatly reduces vibration.

It's all give and take.
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« Reply #79 on: March 31, 2008, 09:10:47 AM »

My KLX250 isn't completely broken in yet, which might be contributing to its power issues.  But I doubt I could ever get it to do 80 on level pavement without making some changes to the fueling.

The front brakes on the other hand are weak.  I can almost pull the lever to the handle bars without generating stoppie inducing deceleration.  I'd describe them as being mushy and weak.  I've bled the front brake line twice with a Mity-Vac and although things improved a little, the brakes remain pretty much as described above.  My next plan is to lightly sand the brake pads and clean the rotor to see if I can't get them to bed in again with more power.
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