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Topic: Aerostich back protector - worth getting?  (Read 4932 times)

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Motocentaur
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« on: January 15, 2007, 08:46:13 AM »

I have accumulated a bunch of Aerostich gift certificates over the holidays, and I intend to get a pair of Darien pants to go with my Darien jacket. I also plan to get the hip pads, but I can't decide about the back pad.

Currently I have a Technic 7 plate back protector that sort of fits in the Darien jacket. The problems are that it is really bulky, blocks the rear vent too much, and has abraded the Gore-tex in a couple of small spots (which I fixed with seam sealer).

The 'stich back pad will fit right and block the vent less, but many people claim that it has a high "suck" factor.

Opinions?
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« Reply #1 on: January 15, 2007, 11:07:53 AM »

While it is nice that you have the certificates to spend at Aerostitch, probably the best back protector that you can buy is the CE rated Bohn back protector.
You are talking about your spine here and that is not something that can be easily fixed.
As some say, you dress for the crash, not the ride.
Just FYI.

Oops!
I meant to say the Knox, not the Bohn.  Sorry.
The CE rated Knox is the one to get.
« Last Edit: January 22, 2007, 09:37:04 AM by fasterbusa » Logged
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« Reply #2 on: January 16, 2007, 08:27:22 PM »

I ordered the Darien pants tonight in "boring grey" with hip pads. I did not get the back pad, although I am still considering it at some later date.

I wouldn't mind some other impressions of it, if anyone cares to chime in.
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« Reply #3 on: January 17, 2007, 01:38:41 AM »


While it is nice that you have the certificates to spend at Aerostitch, probably the best back protector that you can buy is the CE rated Bohn back protector.
You are talking about your spine here and that is not something that can be easily fixed.
As some say, you dress for the crash, not the ride.
Just FYI.


Well...that distinction would probably go to all the various CE-2 back protectors...which offer twice the crash protection of the Bohns.

-Eff
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« Reply #4 on: January 17, 2007, 09:15:40 AM »

+1 for the Bohn suggestion.

While the Aerostich back protector is functional, that's about all it is. I have one, and will use it in a pinch, but prefer to use something more substantial. I also have a Dainese that I wore under my leathers at track days, and so it gets double duty when I'm doing LD tours with the Stich. I bought both the Dainese and the Stich before the Bohn protector was on the market. Now that it's out, it integrates into the Stich as easily as their back protector while offering better protection (IMO), so that seems to be to be the way to go.

Just my $0.03 worth.
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« Reply #5 on: January 19, 2007, 08:04:16 PM »

I've got the standard back protector in my Darien. I agree that the Bohn and others are a better choice for comprehensive protection on track day, but the Stich version ain't bad for regular riding. With the soft armor topped by two HDPE strips it sure is much better than the foam pads that come in most jackets, and flexible too. As a plus, in the summer it helps the air circulation around your torso.
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« Reply #6 on: January 19, 2007, 10:51:32 PM »


While it is nice that you have the certificates to spend at Aerostitch, probably the best back protector that you can buy is the CE rated Bohn back protector.
You are talking about your spine here and that is not something that can be easily fixed.
As some say, you dress for the crash, not the ride.
Just FYI.

There is no such thing as a CE rated Bohn back protector.  To the best of my knowledge they never got true CE certification.  Their claim to be "built to CE specs" was just them copying Knox back protectors.  You want to get a true CE certified back protector look up T-Pro, Knox, Alpinestars or Dainese.  The Joe Rocket Speedmaster back protector is a T-Pro unit, and many of the Teknic protectors are Knox rebadged.  This will widen your search.

This is coming from someone who used a Bohn for years because I liked the design, but don't fall for their bullshit marketing.

The Aerostich protector, like the Vanson one's I've seen, are better than nothing, but you can do better.
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« Reply #7 on: January 20, 2007, 09:00:15 AM »

I know that the 'stich offering is not as protective as the Bohn or some of the others. I'm not really going for a top-shelf, track-oriented protector here. What I am wondering is if the 'stich back pad is a reasonable compromise between safety and convenience, and if I should bother getting one to replace my current back pad.

I currently have a Teknic 7-plate. While it is certainly not the best back protector by a long shot, it seems significantly better than the typical "hunk o' foam" that a lot of jackets have.
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« Reply #8 on: January 21, 2007, 11:50:45 AM »

Personally, I wouldn't  buyt it.  Actually, I DIDN'T buy the 'Stich back pro.  I used a Vanson 4-plate hardshell back pro, retrofitted into my Roadcrafter with 4x 2" wide by 8" long pieces of velcro.  Superbly comfortable - I don't even know it's there.

It held up nicely in an 80mph wreck.
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« Reply #9 on: January 21, 2007, 08:07:42 PM »

I have a Roadcrafter and am a huge fan of all things Aerostitch.  Unfortunately the Aerostitch back protector is a completely worthless piece of crap.
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« Reply #10 on: January 22, 2007, 02:26:42 AM »


While it is nice that you have the certificates to spend at Aerostitch, probably the best back protector that you can buy is the CE rated Bohn back protector.
You are talking about your spine here and that is not something that can be easily fixed.
As some say, you dress for the crash, not the ride.
Just FYI.


The Bohn is not CE rated.  
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« Reply #11 on: January 22, 2007, 02:29:22 AM »


I know that the 'stich offering is not as protective as the Bohn or some of the others. I'm not really going for a top-shelf, track-oriented protector here. What I am wondering is if the 'stich back pad is a reasonable compromise between safety and convenience, and if I should bother getting one to replace my current back pad.


Why not?  The street has more objects you want the back protector for than the track.

I have the Bohn 'Stich back protector that is velcrod into the suit.  I have it out for the winter to make room for my fleece I wear under the 'Stich.  But the rest of the year its in.  And it is not in the way at all.
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« Reply #12 on: January 27, 2007, 03:35:30 PM »



There is no such thing as a CE rated Bohn back protector.  To the best of my knowledge they never got true CE certification.  Their claim to be "built to CE specs" was just them copying Knox back protectors.  You want to get a true CE certified back protector look up T-Pro, Knox, Alpinestars or Dainese.  The Joe Rocket Speedmaster back protector is a T-Pro unit, and many of the Teknic protectors are Knox rebadged.  This will widen your search.

This is coming from someone who used a Bohn for years because I liked the design, but don't fall for their bullshit marketing.

The Aerostich protector, like the Vanson one's I've seen, are better than nothing, but you can do better.


Motocentaur, this doesn't directly address your question as to the adequacy of the Aerostich protector.  But I am in the process of buying a Roadcrafter suit and also wondered about the Aerostich back protector.  Bottom line, I did a lot of research and came to the same conclusions as stk0308.  All back protectors are not created equal, and there are two different levels of CE certification.  I bought the Joe Rocket Speedmaster.  It is a rebranded TPro Forcefield with CE Level 2 certification.  It is a RiDE magazine "Best Buy" and "Recommended Buy".  The TPro also came out tops in a RiDE magazine test in the current issue (Feb. 2007 - this from the Forcefield website, haven't seen the article).  It is very comfortable and I wear it every time I ride.

The CE certification may not be perfect, but it's the only standard out there and I trust it more than Aerostich's advertising copy:

"We use 6, a costly high performance viscoelastic material first developed for use in aerospace applications. Custom shaped for each suit, and removable from elbow, knee, and shoulder pockets, this padding feels soft and molds to your body. On impact it instantly becomes firmer, absorbing and distributing energy."

Ooh, costly and developed for aerospace!  It must be good!

Here is a Web Bike World comparison of Bohn and TPro, and a couple of other links mentioning the RiDE test.

http://www.webbikeworld.com/r3/back-protector/tpro-bohn/
http://www.sounddistribution.co.uk/products.asp?recnumber=1549
http://www.tprobodyarmour.co.uk/news.asp?id=18

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« Reply #13 on: January 27, 2007, 10:44:26 PM »

Of a series of back protectors tested by an independent company for MOTORRAD magazine, the BMW back protector came in 1st and transmitted the least energy to the spine (absorbed the most energy). There were one or two others that came close...all others were way out there.
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« Reply #14 on: January 29, 2007, 12:30:55 PM »


I ordered the Darien pants tonight in "boring grey" with hip pads. I did not get the back pad, although I am still considering it at some later date.

I wouldn't mind some other impressions of it, if anyone cares to chime in.

It's comfy and unobtrusive, and I have no confidence that it would do much of anything to protect my spine in an impact. I consider it to be one more layer of abrasion resistance, pretty much.

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« Reply #15 on: January 31, 2007, 07:08:36 PM »


Of a series of back protectors tested by an independent company for MOTORRAD magazine, the BMW back protector came in 1st and transmitted the least energy to the spine (absorbed the most energy). There were one or two others that came close...all others were way out there.


Old design or the CE-2 jackety-like one that recently came out ($300+)?

-Eff
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« Reply #16 on: March 13, 2007, 10:06:37 PM »

If your Teknic is getting long in the tooth, consider replacing it anyway. The salesperson didn't even know this, but the literature accompanying my Knox back protector says to replace it like a helmet - after any impact, or after five years regardless.

Personally, I wouldn't pay extra money for the Aerostich back pad. I might wear it if it came with (as I did with the back pads in my JRs before I got the Knox), but if you're going to actually go out and buy a back protector, get a real one.
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« Reply #17 on: March 16, 2007, 04:46:17 PM »

Take a look at some of the Dainese backprotectors.  I used to wear one under my 1piece stitch...when I used to wear the stich.  The Dainese protectors are pretty stout, but mainly cover your spine and not your shoulders as much...a little cooler to wear.
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« Reply #18 on: March 19, 2007, 02:23:29 PM »

I had the Roadcrafter back protector in my last Aerostich.  I'd expect it would provide some protection, but less than better gear.  OTYOH, I left it velcro'ed in there and hence it was worn every time the Aerostich was worn.  As they say, the gear can't protect you if it's sitting in your closet.

I now have an Aerostich and the Joe Rocket Speedmaster (T-Pro ForceField) protector.  Right now, I have to don the Speedmaster before the Aerostich, which I do every time.  It could probably be customized to velcro in, but the straps would have to be cut off, and I don't want to do that.  (I also wear leathers from time to time, and I need the back protector to go from one to the other.)


In sum: if you think you really don't need much back protection, go ahead and get the Roadcrafter BP; at least you'd use it ~100% of the time.  If you want real protection, then get the Bohn; it's not CE-rated but way better than the Roadcrafter kit and velcro's right in.  If you want SERIOUS protection, then get a CE-rated piece and either strap into it or have it customized to velcro in.  My two cents.
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« Reply #19 on: March 19, 2007, 03:20:40 PM »


I now have an Aerostich and the Joe Rocket Speedmaster (T-Pro ForceField) protector.  Right now, I have to don the Speedmaster before the Aerostich, which I do every time.  


I also have the T-Pro in my Stich, but I was able to purchase just the pad, which I then mounted with velcro. I feel much better having some proper back protection.

Back pad insert.
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