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Topic: highlights of the 2008 WR250R  (Read 49856 times)

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DogBoy
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« Reply #20 on: September 02, 2008, 06:31:19 PM »

Nice looking rack. Can you rest your foot on it during long standups?   Bigsmile
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B-rent
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« Reply #21 on: September 02, 2008, 06:44:35 PM »

Nice pics Greg. And thanks again for sharing details of the new rack. On closer inspection of the rack, it appears to only have a maximum capacity of 10lbs. I'll likely need something a little beefier to carry gear. The only other rack I know of right now is the Yamaha rack and the Cycleracks rack. I'll sit tight for a rack with a capacity of at least 20lbs.

Yamaha rack:
https://www.yamahagenuineparts.com/Motorcycle/moreinfo.asp?ID=887&shopcat=accessories&Class=Sport%20Bike&Year=YYYY&Model=XXXX

Cycleracks rack:
http://www.cycleracks.com/images/WR250RXjpg.jpg

I fit the DirtBagz on my WRR last weekend. I wasn't expecting that they'd want you to remove the passenger pegs. I ride with my girlfriend, so she needs those. I installed the DirtBags over top of the passenger pegs. It was doable, but not easy. For starters, Yamaha had torqued down the hex bolts so tightly I had to stand on the hex key to get them loosened. I ended up stripping a bolt and a hex key completely as well as deeply gauging the plastic around the bolts. I was using metric hex keys so the play was minimal, and yet it still stripped.

After getting the bolts loosened I found that in order for the DirtBagz rack to fit over the passenger pegs the mounting bracket had to be bent some. With two people, this would've been ok. I was by myself and it was hot out. I got the thing to fit finally but only after getting really pissed and exhausted trying to bend the bracket in place and screw it on. If you plan on keeping the passenger pegs on when/if you mount these, give yourself time and some help. If not, you'll be fine doing it alone as long as you don't strip too many hex bolts in the initial steps.

I'll post pics of the WRR with DirtBagz with passenger pegs still on shortly.

Overall, I'm happy with the DirtBagz. They're beefy, like a heavy duty duffle bag, but still light enough it helps keep the weight down on the bike. I also really like the low mounting of them in order to reduce messing up the COG. I can't even tell they're there when I ride.

I had a fun experience this weekend. While out getting some ice cream with my girl, she pointed me in the direction of a big construction site. She kept egging me on and before I knew it, we were getting our share of butt punishment from the seat of the WRR riding two up on dirt. It's hard to stand up with someone holding on for dear life behind you, so you just take have to take it.  Crazy  I tried aiming for milder sections to spare our butts but I couldn't help but try a rough section every now and again.  Bigok

After finishing up around back and riding out in front to hop back onto the newly paved road which led to the construction site, we found a security guard staring at us through his windshield. The 15 foot section leading back onto the paveway was a mound of dirt and gravel about 1-2 feet high. I throttled on to get enough speed to better cross the mound and we pounced down on the pavement going 15mph or so with the security guard staring at us through an open window. I was close enough to see his face was a mixture of seriousness and ease at this point, and as he cracked a smile, we blew past him at a heart-pounding 25mph.  Embarassment  I nodded as we passed him and punched it for the main road which was at the end of the side road.

I thought this was the end too...

The side road ended a tenth of a mile up the road with another 1-2 foot high mound of dirt/gravel between it and the main road. As I got closer to the end I thought "shit, I might have to talk to this guy," and a quick glance in my mirror showed he was following closely behind. This mound was a little higher than the other one, but feeling the ping of urgency I rolled on again and we pounced up and over the mound this time hitting a substantial edge of the road as we attempted to make it up and onto the main road. We didn't catch any air, but the front end bounced up enough to make me think, "yikes, hadn't had the front end that high yet."  EEK!

There was no freaking way that car was going to follow us.  Lol

I rolled on hard and tried not to crash as I was laughing so hard I started coughing. My girlfriend, Lisa, doesn't smile or laugh very much. I could even hear her laughing in my helmet with my illegal foam ear plugs in. And we kept laughing as we recalled the story to each other after we got home.

I'll take a picture of the miniscule amount of dirt on my WRR for your viewing pleasure.  Bigsmile
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« Reply #22 on: September 03, 2008, 05:09:12 AM »

B-rent -- the Yamaha rack has the same weight limit.  I've seen one Cycleracks rack and it had rust all over it in under a year.  I wasn't impressed with the sample of one.

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Nice looking rack. Can you rest your foot on it during long standups?


Sadly, there is a whole thread about that here: http://www.supermotojunkie.com/showthread.php?t=64708

Of course, I didn't need the internet to figure out you don't need the clutch to bring the front wheel up. Rolleyes
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« Reply #23 on: September 03, 2008, 09:11:50 PM »

The reason I got a motard.  I like riding local paved roads.  And there are some great gravel roads connecting them.


So how much dirt riding is reasonable to expect from a supermoto? Are you OK if you just stick with dry dirt and gravel roads? I really want to learn how to slide around. Jumps don't interest me (I'm way too old and have got to keep my day job).
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« Reply #24 on: September 03, 2008, 09:33:01 PM »

Pics of the DirtBagz. Note how the right bag is out and over the exhaust.





A not so great pic of the DirtBag rack installed over top of the passenger peg. The metal clasp comes from a strap on the front of the DirtBag.



Inside of a DirtBag. These are the bigger model of the two, the Ranger.



While parked for lunch at a park in Bethesda, MD.



A park service road I found close to home. There was a nice river crossing up the road, but it was too dark to get any good pics.





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« Reply #25 on: September 04, 2008, 09:51:48 AM »




So how much dirt riding is reasonable to expect from a supermoto? Are you OK if you just stick with dry dirt and gravel roads? I really want to learn how to slide around. Jumps don't interest me (I'm way too old and have got to keep my day job).



I'm always a little nervous about flats.  There is noooo problem sliding this bike (the teeny, tiny bit I can with my mad skillz  Rolleyes) on gravel.  My next pair of tires will probably be Distanzias-SMs both for a little more longevity and that kind of gravel riding like the pix I showed.  The stock tires understandably have NO traction in wet grass.  Slides in wet grass are easily controllable with throttle, though.  Lol  I'll bet true mud would be hopeless, too, although I've had my Subaru with all season street tires on some pretty slick, muddy, unpaved roads (thin layer of completely wet mud over hard packed dirt).  You just need to keep momentum, and that should be easier on a sub 300 pound motorcycle as compared to a 3000+ pound car at night.

Concerns over flats aside, the bike should do fine on double track, smooth single track, gravel, and fire roads.  Some issues would need to be addressed for "real" dual sporting: it gives up about 1" of ground clearance to the R due to the smaller wheels, but you can gain that back with a 21" front / 18" rear wheelset if/when it becomes available.  It is geared higher stock and really should be geared down for trail riding.  It has no protection (skid plate, rad protector, rad reservoir/ R/R protector, bark busters, etc.), but neither does the R really.  Between the small wheels, relatively stiff suspension, and gearing, it doesn't really want to roll up curbs like my buddy's KLR set to full soft suspension did.  This bike in stock form will have lots of issues on rocky trails or climbing over fallen logs.  But I didn't buy an SM to do that.

That said, all of these things can be addressed over time.  Dial in the adjustable suspension to full soft, swap wheelsets (and run a +1 sprocket on the dirt wheels), install protection and just leave it on.  Had I been able to find a used DRZ-SM for less money, I would have probably already been making those investments.  I could only find new bikes, thought, so that cut into my farkle budget for a few months.
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« Reply #26 on: September 11, 2008, 05:32:08 PM »

An update to the goings on of the WRR. I'm consistently seeing in the low 60 something MPGs. I'm not really concerned about this compared to Yamaha's stated 71mpg because I'm riding the bike quite hard to break it in.

While riding into work yesterday on I270 South, I was faced with 20-30mph gusts of wind and a consistent 10-15mph headwind. It's the first time I thought that riding it long distance might be an effort. The front end was experiencing a gust induced wobble that was exacerbated by trucks and tractor trailors around it. It wasn't altogether pleasant, and I found it a little scary one time. The wind gusts also had an impact on sitting upright, as from time to time I found them so strong as to require me to strain to stay put. If I planned on riding this long distance, I might invest in getting a screen for it as some have done on the ADVRider forum. I should also mention that in the extra wind, I nearly had the throttle pegged to keep it at 75mph. (see pic below for ADVRider member's WRR with screen)



I've been in touch with Renazco and Corbin about getting a seat for it. Corbin has mentioned the need to offer a seat for it, and in their email reply to me said, "We need to get one of those bikes into R&D so we can get tooled up to start the manufacturing process." They offered to make me a custom seat by shipping them my stock seat for alteration. I haven't commited yet.

I rode the WRR up in Michaux State Forest last Sunday, on gravel roads/dirt roads and on a couple single track trails. I've got many pictures from that and I plan to post a small ride report. I was still thrilled at the suspension and performance of the bike on gravel and dirt, but when the going got rough on the single track trails, I found it needed to have more give. (and that was standing up) I plan on adjusting the suspension for single track and just dealing with the reduced street performance.

I rode off the road onto this new plot of land for this house being built yesterday. It was up a daunting 100 yard incline which gave me pause before doing it. I started in slow 2nd and easily made it to 3rd halfway up the hill continuing to roll on and up and over the top of the hill. A quick turn around and I was like, "uhhh I don't know about going down." LOL I did though standing up, partially going sideways, in 3rd letting the engine doing the braking.

The oil change on the WRR is a cinch. It was refreshing to be able to fly through it faster than a car then having to deal with the fairing like on the Sprint, which doubles the time needed.

So far, 1300 trouble free smile sprinkled miles.
« Last Edit: September 11, 2008, 05:34:11 PM by B-rent » Logged

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« Reply #27 on: September 11, 2008, 06:01:59 PM »

You know, I'd been to ADV and TT, but hadn't thought to check out S-T.N for reviews on the WRR.  I rode a slightly used one around Chicago's urban dirt track last night (I-290, surface streets, and even some gravel and dirt in an abandoned lot or two).

I pick it up next week. Bigsmile

Nice thread.  You're helping keep any buyer's remorse at bay.  Now, when does next Wednesday get here?
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« Reply #28 on: September 12, 2008, 05:26:06 PM »


You know, I'd been to ADV and TT, but hadn't thought to check out S-T.N for reviews on the WRR.


I've been reading those as well. Unfortunately, due to the setup at work, I can't post to those forums. I primarily post when I'm at work.  EEK!

You might also check out supermotojunkie.com. I see Greg (1moreroad) is posting over there.


I pick it up next week. Bigsmile

Nice thread.  You're helping keep any buyer's remorse at bay.  Now, when does next Wednesday get here?


Nice! Thanks Oblivion. I'm looking forward to hearing how it complements your life too.  Beerchug
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« Reply #29 on: September 13, 2008, 09:49:44 PM »


You might also check out supermotojunkie.com. I see Greg (1moreroad) is posting over there.



SMJ is a little... different than STN, though.  Some threads:
What's your best police chase?  Here's mine.
Why is my tire worn out in the center since I corner with mad skillz and only occasionally wheelie?
Do you piss people off when you ride, too?  I can't help it!
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« Reply #30 on: September 14, 2008, 12:33:38 PM »




SMJ is a little... different than STN, though.  Some threads:
What's your best police chase?  Here's mine.
Why is my tire worn out in the center since I corner with mad skillz and only occasionally wheelie?
Do you piss people off when you ride, too?  I can't help it!



Not to worry. I'm sure you will be posting in those threads soon enough.
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« Reply #31 on: September 15, 2008, 08:11:28 AM »





Not to worry. I'm sure you will be posting in those threads soon enough.


This is wwwaaayyy too small a town to be getting into police chases or pi$$ing people off.

There is a time and a place for everything.

The BT090s are scuffed all the way over to the edge.  It is sooo easy to lean this bike over.  Just find a couple of empty farm roads and have fun.
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« Reply #32 on: September 16, 2008, 03:29:58 PM »

I was hoping Yammy would come out with a WR450R in '09...  Sad
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« Reply #33 on: September 16, 2008, 03:38:22 PM »


I was hoping Yammy would come out with a WR450R in '09...  Sad


200 more ccs is not obviously better.  A WR450 could not have been price competitive.  It would probably have been $1000+ more than the DRZ and pushing into Husq/KTM territory.  Yamaha would have lost that fight for not being exotic enough.  Yamaha would have probably made it street legal and neutering the WR450X for sumo racing unlike the smaller displacement Husqs and KTMs.  Not too many people care about 26,000 mile valve adjustments if they only keep their bikes for 10,000 miles.  Some folks go so far as to view their $6k WR250s as "disposable" which a $7500 WR450 would not be.

Oblivion ~ did you pick yours up yet?

Mine continues to impress, although I have just 250 miles on it in a month. Sad  On a cool morning with cold tires and too hot a turn, I easily saved a front then rear wheel slide with no drama.  Stupid on my part, but the bike saved my butt.  Floats over deep gravel.  I can aim for dirt and debris on the road without a problem.

Consistently getting 59 - 60 mpg (250 miles = 3 tanks  Lol ) around town and local roads.
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« Reply #34 on: September 16, 2008, 05:30:44 PM »



Oblivion ~ did you pick yours up yet?



No sir.   Crazy

Between a money transfer cockup and the seller's availability, it'll either be Friday, or not for another entire week after that.  Cross your fingers for a Friday pickup or there will be blood. Bigsmile

This does give time for the gear and handguards (Acerbis Rally Pro) I ordered to show up, though.  I'll zip-tie the handguards to my Seca and make thumper noises.

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« Reply #35 on: September 19, 2008, 11:36:06 AM »

The peanut sized gas tank sucks.  The low fuel light comes on in about 80 - 90 miles.  I'm running 87 octane pump gas since the local station was out of 91.  No audible pinging.  I ran a few tanks of 87 through my ZX6R with no problems, and this bike has lower compression.




No sir.   Crazy

Between a money transfer cockup and the seller's availability, it'll either be Friday, or not for another entire week after that.  Cross your fingers for a Friday pickup or there will be blood. Bigsmile

This does give time for the gear and handguards (Acerbis Rally Pro) I ordered to show up, though.  I'll zip-tie the handguards to my Seca and make thumper noises.




You buying a used one?   Bigok  They're showing up on SMJ cheap.  They're too slow and all the newbie riders that started on them are "outgrowing" them.

Do the handguards have the full wrap around metal?  I think they're called barkbusters.

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« Reply #36 on: September 19, 2008, 06:18:04 PM »

Off to pick it up right now.  Getting one w/ 860 or so miles. Decent price. Saw one go about $600 cheaper on E-Bay w/ 95 miles after I'd made my deal, but I'm still happy w/ the price and condition of the bike.  As for the guards, I'm not sure what your'e asking, but I'll post up some shots when/as I mount them.  From product photos, I was lead to believe they're the full metal I think you're referring to, but I'll know for sure when I get 'em.  Expected them today, but according to UPS, my packages were held up due to a train derailment  EEK!  They did make it to the next checkpoint, just not out for delivery today.

My new HJC SP-X helmet showed up yesterday, though. Yami-ish blue, of course.

Off I go to sit in traffic.  But this time it's alright because there's a new-to-me bike at the end of the road.  Bigok
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« Reply #37 on: September 29, 2008, 02:12:39 PM »

You enjoying your bike Oblivion?  Razz

I finally had some time on my vacation last week to get some of the obligatory farkles on the WRR.  Bigok  I opted for the Flatland Racing SkidPlate over the ThumperTalk plate because of the thread on Thumpertalk explaining many people having vibration/sound issues with the ThumperTalk plate. Those who had the Flatland plate didn't seem to have the issue. Plus, I really liked the look of the Flatland plate together with the extra airflow given to the engine by the small holes in the Flatland plate. Note how they left a large hole for you to still be able to access the oil drain plug. Nice!



I was thrilled to find how easy it was to install as well as how solid a product it was. It's huge too! You only need to remove Yamaha's white plastic engine protectors, place the plate over the engine, and screw down four hex bolts. It took me 10 minutes, as I didn't know at first that you had to remove Yamaha's white plastic engine protectors.

The Acerbis Rally Pro handguards were next. This was a two hour job. I'd never done anything like it before and the directions included sucked. There's a schematic showing how they mount to the bars; that's it. I used my Craftsman roto-cutting tool to cut the ends off the handgrips. The clutch side went without a hitch. The throttle side has a plastic cap on the end of the grip. It looks like a large white lifesaver. I read about this online but not in relation to the WRR/X. I couldn't find anything on this bike. So I just started drilling hoping for the best. I drilled a circle around the outside of the throttle grip and afterward, realized I'd also drilled through the end cap. Thankfully, it went ok and with a little fuss related to actually making it look nice, I got the handguards on and am happy with the result.

I was also impressed with the quality of the Acerbis handguards. I don't care for the large logo on the handguards, but the product is well-made, heavy, and will do, well, what handguards are supposed to do, protect the clutch and throttle areas in the event they meet something at a high rate of speed.  Lol  I also found that these not only keep the air off your hands riding, but keep them relatively dry in the rain.  Headscratch  I got home after testing them in pouring down rain on Saturday and my gloves were nearly dry.

They really need to get a new pic of these. These are much much larger in person.



Finally, I installed my hothands heated grip covers on the handgrips. Thankfully, I hadn't taken too much off the end of the grips installing the handguards to fit the hothands on. They just wrap around the grips and velcro on. They are so hot in fact you have to take your hand off the grip every once in a while to cool them off.



I took the seat off, thinking the battery would be under the seat. (two bolts you take off for the seat are under the rear fender. 9mm if I recall.) The battery's actually under what Yamaha calls Panel D. (the left hand side panel where the inside of your left thigh rests) You have a single bolt to take off for that, the front snaps off, and you pull the panel forward. Easy.

I'll take a pic of it and post it for you all to see with the new farkles. 1853 miles on the odometer when I hopped off at work today.
« Last Edit: September 29, 2008, 04:46:51 PM by B-rent » Logged

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« Reply #38 on: September 29, 2008, 02:23:06 PM »

Quote
The Acerbis Rally Pro handguards were next. This was a two hour job. I'd never done anything like it before and the directions included sucked. There's a schematic showing how they mount to the bars; that's it. I used my Craftsman roto-cutting tool to cut the ends off the handgrips. The clutch side went without a hitch. The throttle side has a plastic cap on the end of the grip. It looks like a large white lifesafer. I read about this online but not in relation to the WRR/X. I couldn't find anything on this bike. So I just started drilling hoping for the best. I drilled a circle around the outside of the throttle grip and afterward, realized I'd also drilled through the end cap. Thankfully, it went ok and with a little fuss related to actually making it look nice, I got the handguards on and am happy with the result.

I was also impressed with the quality of the Acerbis handguards. I don't care for the large logo on the handguards, but the product is well-made, heavy, and will do, well, what handguards are supposed to do, protect the clutch and throttle areas in the event they meet something at a high rate of speed.    I also found that these not only keep the air off your hands riding, but keep them relatively dry in the rain.    I got home after testing them in pouring down rain on Saturday and my gloves were nearly dry.

They really need to get a new pic of these. These are much much larger in person.


Good to hear.  Any photos of the installation would be welcome.  Mine should show up with the brown-suited Santa today.

Chornbe sold me a battery voltmeter/temp guage that I want to install sometime but probably not until next weekend.  It fits perfectly between the speedo and the headlight cowling.

Then heated grips and a spare fuse box from CAsporttouring hopefully by the end of October.
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« Reply #39 on: September 29, 2008, 04:43:36 PM »

Hey Greg. I didn't take any photos of the installation for the Rally Pros. It's easy to understand how the parts come together though. The schematic provided does help with this so you'll have no problem there.

The problem is the cutting of the grips, mostly the throttle grip. If you have a rotary cutting tool, like a Dremel, this will make it a lot easier. If not, you may have a tough time getting the white lifesaver out of the throttle grips tubing. You may be able to knock it out with a screwdriver and hammer, I don't know.

I'd recommend doing the clutch side first, as it was easy and made me more confident. I worked from the middle of the grip end and worked outward. When you do this, you eventually run into the metal tubing of the handlebar so it acts as a natural stopping point. This worked great for the clutch side. The throttle side I did the same thing and found that because of the plastic cap on the end of the bar, the cutting tool will keep going around the grip end and start into the main part of the grip. (NO!  Lol) It will not stop you from cutting. You have to choose a point to stop once you get the cap off. I went all the way to the metal of the bar which shortened the throttle grip a half inch or so. This did shorten the throttle sure, but it's long enough for me and I have wide hands, and was still long enough to have the HotHands over top the grip and have the HandGuards installed.

I found having a utility knife on hand made it easier to cut flat edges out of the rubber grips and make them look nicer. The rotary cutting tool does a good job of getting you there, the utility knife did a better job of making it look finished.

I forgot to mention that for the throttle side, I also had to very subtlely nudge the mirror/front brake to the left a bit to have it fit properly inside the Acerbis HandGuard. There are two bolts you unscrew to loosen this. You can't miss them as they face you when you're sitting on the bike and are on the right side mirror housing.

Hopefully all this didn't confuse you but gave you a better feel for installing the Acerbis Handguards.

Good deal on the voltmeter/temp gauge. I'd like to do that too. We need to find a good tach for this bike too.  Thumbsup

Brown-suited Santa...  Lol
« Last Edit: September 29, 2008, 04:59:18 PM by B-rent » Logged

The early bird gets the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese.  -Steven Wright
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