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Topic: First Bike: Ninja 500r vs. 250r  (Read 50503 times)

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Mrs. Leanintree
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« Reply #60 on: November 05, 2009, 02:40:52 PM »

My 1st bike-Honda CRF-230 street legalized, fun, didn't kill me if I had a wrist spasm. 2nd bike 1987 Honda Hurricane, better than the the CRF but still has it's assorted problems, doesn't handle steep climbs over mtn passes. But it is road worthy and that's more than I can say for the CRF. The Hurricane rides nice on the road, has a touring sprocket. OK seat position. Seat height to foot pegs is actually a little short, my knees get pretty sore by the end of a full day. Hoping in a couple years I can upgrade to something a little more settled on long road trips.
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« Reply #61 on: November 08, 2009, 10:35:41 AM »

picture of ninja zx250 from kawasaki motor indonesia.

http://i685.photobucket.com/albums/vv214/tigersyndicate/ninja-250r-4-copy.jpg
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« Reply #62 on: December 13, 2009, 08:47:39 PM »

Okay, for what it's worth here's my two cents:
My first bike was a Ninja 500ex and I loved it! Easy to manouver, comfortable position, enough power to pass quickly when needed, and the gas milage was superb. In fact, I was reluctant to get a different bike but hard luggage and an appropriate rack was hard to come by and I want to tour. So I moved up to a 2009 Ninja 650R and find it even better than the 500, first time I rode it off the lot (a great memory) I was thinking Wow! Made up for my emotional departure from my silver Kwaker. Which is for sale, just for you! Lol Seriously, I am finding it to be a great bike, put a quick 1000k on it in the first week I had it. Handles great and really gives a lot of confidence to a new rider (that's me, just started May 2009) but has plenty of power to keep up with the pack. Flickable in twisties if that's your thing, and comfortable for the long haul. That being said, the Ninja 250R is a great bike, my brother has one and loves it, but he lives in the big city and as a commuter it is great but for longer trips...probably would be fine, depending on your size. My brother is 5'11 and 190lbs, looks a bit out of place on a smaller bike. Not that you want something huge for a first bike but you don't want to be thinking about another right away, do you? Now the SV650 is a good bike, but keep in mind the riding position puts a lot more weight on your wrists, while the Ninja has you more upright. My hubby went for a long tour this summer and one of the guys rode a SV650 and could hardly move at the end of the day! And this guy is in really good shape too, just that riding position got a little crampy after a bit. IMO with the Ninja 500ex or 650R you can't go wrong, maybe I am biased, so read some reviews, do some research and then go buy one! Happy trails! Bigsmile
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« Reply #63 on: December 13, 2009, 09:51:31 PM »

Now the SV650 is a good bike, but keep in mind the riding position puts a lot more weight on your wrists, while the Ninja has you more upright. My hubby went for a long tour this summer and one of the guys rode a SV650 and could hardly move at the end of the day! And this guy is in really good shape too, just that riding position got a little crampy after a bit.


Welcome to the forum, GoGreen!

I think you mean the SV650S has a cramped position, not the SV650. They are two very different bikes powered by the same engine. 

SV650S = clip-ons with a sportbike-like riding position (and a small fairing):



SV650 = standard handlebar with a very neutral riding position (naked, no fairing):



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« Reply #64 on: December 13, 2009, 10:39:27 PM »

If you're looking for a naked SV650, I've got one for sale.   :pokestick:

http://www.sport-touring.net/forums/index.php/topic,47692.0.html
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« Reply #65 on: December 14, 2009, 10:11:04 AM »

Markster, Oh, yup, you got me there, I did mean the SV650S,  Wink thanks for the clarification.Guess you need a windscreen for the naked bike, unless you like getting blasted!
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« Reply #66 on: January 04, 2010, 10:22:55 PM »

How did I not post here earlier?  Lol

I have had 180lbs on my 250 and done 800+ mile days.  With a modified seat I found it far more comfortable than my 636 due to the better ergos.  It's an option, but if you like to be lazy with shifting and pack a lot the 500 might be a better choice for you.  Just depends on what you want.  It's probably worth trying the 250 for a year.  If you are careful buying you can sell it for almost what you paid, and who doesn't like having an almost free year of riding?
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« Reply #67 on: January 11, 2010, 01:05:42 AM »

mine is a 2004 zzr600 and i couldnt be happier! woot
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« Reply #68 on: January 19, 2010, 11:07:24 AM »

try Bajaj pulsar 200 dts-i.. its an confortable motorcycle.. because I'm using it in here..  Smile
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« Reply #69 on: March 03, 2010, 12:10:27 PM »

here is my pulsar. i just give u another alternative bikes.. fuel consumption of pulsar is 1:40

http://i685.photobucket.com/albums/vv214/tigersyndicate/pembangkit2.jpg
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« Reply #70 on: March 27, 2010, 10:39:56 PM »

Well I am pretty excited; I just registered for Action Motorcycle School in Langley for mid-May. Got my learner's back in fall, so am taking it sedately!

I'm weighing the Ninja 500 or 650 vs the SV650  and feel that I probably can't go far wrong. The Suzuki's looks really work for me, so it might be a bit ahead. Someone recently warned about long wait time for Kawa parts, but that seems like an unlikely problem to me.

I haven't entirely eliminated the Ninja250, but its fading...
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« Reply #71 on: March 28, 2010, 11:03:48 AM »

You'll be fine with any of the bikes you mentioned in your post  Thumbsup

Just look for a good deal on Craigslist, and pull the trigger.

PS post up after you go to motorcycle school! I have 4 friends all enrolled in the same basic riding school, and so I'd love to hear if maybe there was something you would have liked to know before going to class, so that I can help out my friends Smile
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« Reply #72 on: March 29, 2010, 02:03:59 PM »

What about a BMW F800GS?  I've been taken by them for a good while, and the dual-sport capabilities are attractive.  My understanding of the 800 motor (in the GS and ST) is that it is quite easy to control.  A shame the BMWs are so expensive, and hard to find used, though.
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« Reply #73 on: March 29, 2010, 02:21:44 PM »


What about a BMW F800GS?  I've been taken by them for a good while, and the dual-sport capabilities are attractive.  My understanding of the 800 motor (in the GS and ST) is that it is quite easy to control.  A shame the BMWs are so expensive, and hard to find used, though.


Why not look for a BMW F650 (a.k.a. Funduro) or the F650GS or an Aprilia Pegaso?  They are all powered by what is supposed to be the smoothest single-cylinder bike ever and should be available for far less money than an F800GS (though the Pegaso does hold it's value better than it should because of it's rarity).

I was after a Funduro myself when I ended up buying my Yamaha.
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« Reply #74 on: April 11, 2010, 06:23:18 PM »

Reread this thread, looking forward to the motorcycle course in May.  The sunshine that we're getting here these days is making riding more attractive than ever!
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« Reply #75 on: April 11, 2010, 07:48:18 PM »

My first bike ( after a 30 year break) was a Ninja 250.  After taking the MSF I quickly determined that I wanted either a Ninja 250 or Ninja 500.  I'm short and fat, and wanted a bike that I could flatfoot.  Cruisers did not then or now hold any interest for me.

I found two Ninjas for sale in my price range, a 250 and a 500.  I went with the 250 mainly because of the lower price.  I wasn't really sure how much I'd like riding and didn't want to spend more than I had too.  I'd heard many stories of people paying list for motorcycles only to sell them at a steep discount a year latter with 500 miles on the odometer because the reality was less than the dream for them.

I quickly found that really enjoyed long touring, I enjoyed spending a whole day on the bike.  The 250's performance was adequate even hauling my 250lbs.  I've done many 500+ mile days on my 250, and one SS1000.  

I strongly prefer the 'Gen 1' Ninja 250 (pre 2008) for touring.  The motors are pretty the same, but the Gen 1 ergos are more upright, more 'UJM'.  The Gen 2 has race replica styling, but the only significant mechanical difference is 17 inches wheels as opposed to the 16 inch Gen 1 wheels.  

If I knew then what I know now I probably would have paid the extra money for a 500ex, mainly for the ability to carry real hard bags. Saddle and tank bags are fine, but there is a lot of utility in lockable hard bags when one is traveling.  As far as I know its very difficult to mount hard bags on Ninja 250.

Don't plan on 'hot-rodding' a Ninja 250.  That's just ridiculous, the little motor was hot-rodded for you by Kawi-San.  Trying to add horsepower is just throwing away reliability for no gain.

I recently added an FJR to the garage, but I still ride and enjoy my 250 a lot.

If you decide to go with a newer bike consider the Yamaha FZ6R.  I've test rode one, and its a mini-FJR in a lot of ways. It has upright ergos and a very silky smooth inline 4 engine and excellent transmission.  You can get hard bags for it.
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« Reply #76 on: April 12, 2010, 03:07:59 AM »

I was in your position about a year ago and ended up getting a ninja650r.  I've been very happy with the choice.  Other than the "OMG it's my first ride on my own motorcycle" jitters I never felt intimidated or afraid of the bike.  I've done everything from commuting to 300 mile days, which isn't much but at 6'4 and 270lbs is no small feat.  After about 2000 miles I put on some lower bars which give it a much more sporty feel but sacrificed a bit of comfort.  I can flat foot the bike with tons of room to spare so even at your height it shouldn't be an issue.  Despite it being learner friendly, comfortable, and generally viewed as a wannabe super sport the thing can haul some serious ass if you ask it to.      

Having said that, if I had to do it all over again knowing what I know now I would give some serious consideration to the SV.

Just my .02$
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« Reply #77 on: March 19, 2011, 05:13:18 PM »

Long time since I originally started this thread; I've taken my time, read many comments/threads/reviews, and have pretty much settled on an SV650.  Hoping to obtain one this spring.

Thanks to all for your comments; some things need to gestate, and hopefully the patience will prove to have been productive of a good decision.
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« Reply #78 on: March 21, 2011, 05:25:24 AM »

The SV is a cool choice. You can get your fill of inline twins or I4's down the line.

If you start on an SV, I will say this.. 2, 3, or 5 bikes later.. you're gonna have an itch for another water-cooled V-twin powerplant.. and not much else is going to scratch that itch. It's a very cool and unique motor.

The fact that you dismissed the SV for its power tells me you should be able to handle it as a first bike (just be patient and very careful).... it WILL be a little bit of a handful, but it seems designed to be steady and manageable, not tweaky, peaky, and finicky like a supersport. There's not many surprises on the SV. It does what you ask it and it inspires confidence... although as a new rider, it will also leave you grabbing the bars for dear life for a few weeks/months if you decide to get foolish with it. And it's also a really really cool motor. You probably won't appreciate it completely though until you move on. Then you'll learn just how spoiled you were.

The truth is riding solo and unloaded below 6K rpm, I'd trade my Blackbird for the SV in a hearbeat, every time. Of course, above 6K rpm, it's a whole different story. But I spend a lot more time below 6K than above it... and the SV has its torquey and kind of wooden-feeling "thing" to it that's great in its own way. You can ride a gixxer or an R6, a 750, or even the Blackbird, and still find yourself missing a tiny little bit of what the SV has. I suspect the lightness and flickability of the Ninja 250 is similar in that regard. And the fact that I could wring the hell out of my CB-1 around town without getting halfway into triple digits, may have made it the most awesome fantasy-racer bike ever. They're all great bikes regardless though. You really can't go wrong.

As a general rule, smaller displacement means that you can beat the living snot out of the bike like a grand prix racer and learn what it's like to push a bike without raising the eyebrows of your local LEO's. Larger displacement limits those opportunities to explore, but offers a more relaxed touring/riding experience.... V-twins fall somewhere in between and give you the sensation of a more exciting riding experience because they start to pull from any rpm, regardless of the situation. I4's tend to demand that you really flirt with the power band at all times and if it's a powerful bike, those opportunities are few and far between. Believe me, smaller bikes give you the most sane and rational fun you can have on the street without losing your license! The SV is a pretty "grown up" bike... you need to be a little judicious with it.. and sometimes that just isn't as much fun as flogging something with less power. But while the SV is at the upper limit of what you can flog on a regular basis, believe me, you will find the opportunities... which is something I've yet to do significantly with my blackbird even after nearly six months of ownership (winter sucks!). Bah! Why own a beast of a bike if you can't rail with it! And for that matter, why wish you had more when you simply can't use it? Shit, I'd have more fun dragging a knee on a 250 than dealing with winter on a blackbird! I'm telling you, this bike better make up for it come summer time! It owes me big time!

So I say, let money decide. Because this is your first bike, not your last... GET THE BEST DEAL YOU CAN FIND! Ensure that you can sell it for at least $300 more than you paid. The more that you're able to be into motorcycling without losing a fortune, the longer lasting the hobby/interest/passion can remain with you through the good times and the bad.

Getting locked into one model of bike kinda of screws your ability to get a great deal. Just walk into any transaction with a short-list of 3-5 bikes and a willingness to walk away and wait a few more weeks...  if the deal isn't great, wait for the one that is. At the end of the day, your first bike isn't a huge issue. There's lots of decent first bikes out there. And you WILL love, and have fond memories of, whatever you wind up with... and you will find certain reasons to love whatever you wind up with. They're all good in their own way. They'll all take you somewhere special.

Save your money... just take a great deal on whatever you happen to find. It's your first bike, not your last. If you've saved money on a good deal, you can sell it 4 months down the road for more than you paid for it and buy something that better suits your particular preferences, once you have a better idea of what you really want from a bike.
« Last Edit: March 21, 2011, 07:40:35 AM by OrangeSVS » Logged

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« Reply #79 on: March 21, 2011, 05:01:01 PM »

Good points!
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