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Topic: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...  (Read 44187 times)

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HipGnosis
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« Reply #120 on: June 10, 2010, 02:55:08 PM »

* If you've got a wheel that's just chronically difficult to balance when you put tires on, go ahead and static balance it sans tire. You'll likely find the wheel itself is WAY out. The rear wheel on my FJR was like this, and pretty bad.

Then mark the heavy spot of the wheel so you can align the light dot of new tires to it.
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« Reply #121 on: June 10, 2010, 08:53:19 PM »

When changing the oil on the Bandit I Take 4 pieces of tinfoil, fold them in half and layer them back to front over the exhaust and up the header. When done, clean up is quick and there is little to no oil from the filter left to burn on the pipe. Sounds pretty obvious but I don't recall seeing it here.
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« Reply #122 on: September 13, 2010, 01:11:18 AM »

i have used a sparkplug socket fliped backwards and using the ext to remove axles when you dont have the right allen key
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« Reply #123 on: September 19, 2010, 03:08:46 AM »

a few tips/ tricks.  vinager is a fast and cheap sub for pb blaster or wd. it will free up rusted parts in no time. I got a thin plastic mat at walmart and slip it inside the belly pan when doing oik and filter changes on my zzr. all the oil falls to the plastic and then drains to the rear of the bike(dont forget the catch pan).
Fot the underbucket shims (should work on others also) when checking and reshimming the valves I have a program on my laptop that u enter the exsisting shim, your goal (spec)  and the size feeler guage u used. it spits out the new shim size you need to install. I can give it out if anybody wants it. its a excel (xls) format, and i have a pdf sheet i print off that i can log the shim, fleer guage size ect. its a pdf
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« Reply #124 on: September 19, 2010, 11:19:20 AM »


 I have a program on my laptop that u enter the exsisting shim, your goal (spec)  and the size feeler guage u used. it spits out the new shim size you need to install. I can give it out if anybody wants it. its a excel (xls) format, and i have a pdf sheet i print off that i can log the shim, fleer guage size ect. its a pdf


I would like to have this program if possible. I need to do my valves soon. Thx
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« Reply #125 on: September 22, 2010, 11:06:29 AM »

I got a thin plastic mat at walmart and slip it inside the belly pan when doing oik and filter changes on my zzr. all the oil falls to the plastic and then drains to the rear of the bike(dont forget the catch pan).
You can get 'flexible cutting boards' at the dollar store(s) now.
I use one to protect the rear tire when oiling my chain.
They're also good for working on delicate items as they are clean (if you don't use it to 'aqua-duct' your used oil) and for sorting thru bolts & nuts; dump em out on the mat, sort thru, roll up the board/mat to lift and funnel them back into coffee can.
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« Reply #126 on: September 22, 2010, 11:56:47 AM »



They're also good for working on delicate items as they are clean (if you don't use it to 'aqua-duct' your used oil) and for sorting thru bolts & nuts; dump em out on the mat, sort thru, roll up the board/mat to lift and funnel them back into coffee can.


I like that one  Thumbsup
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« Reply #127 on: January 14, 2011, 06:22:07 PM »

Stole this tip from another thread similiar to this on another forum...

Need to grab hold of a polished shaft without damaging it? Something like a shock shaft or a fork leg?

You need the Sticky Rubber Trick!

1) Cut out a long rectangle of rubber from an old inner tube. Enough to go around the object several times.

2) Spritz the rubber with brake or carb cleaner and quickly wipe off the powder and other gunk. You need the rubber to be fairly clean. (Clean the object you're clamping while you're at it.)

3) Spritz it again, and let the solvent soak in a bit, making the rubber sorta sticky.

4) Wrap the rubber tightly around said shiny object several times.

5) Clamp around the thick rubber glob using whatever abusive method works best -- Vice grips, vice, etc.

6) Marvel as the sticky rubber gives plenty of traction to keep the part from rotating or moving, yet the layers of rubber protect it from the jaws of the securing device.
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« Reply #128 on: January 14, 2011, 09:52:19 PM »


Put bearings in the oven before press fitting.
The second half was right.
Fixed. Cool

Love the Nickle trick to make a wrench fit.


Different applications. I was thinking of wheel bearings on bikes (sealed units pressing into wheel cups). All depends on what needs to be smaller (that's what goes into the freezer).
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« Reply #129 on: February 02, 2011, 12:28:33 PM »

A plastic wire tie folded in half can be used to push a battery nut up where u can get a thread started...Also holds it in place......



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« Reply #130 on: February 02, 2011, 02:28:56 PM »


A plastic wire tie folded in half can be used to push a battery nut up where u can get a thread started...Also holds it in place......



Dan


Me, I use a bit of grease. But then, that works for everything.  Wink
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« Reply #131 on: February 02, 2011, 05:01:54 PM »

When trying to remove rusted philips head screws (i.e. carb screws) tap the top of the screwdriver with a hammer while loosening.  Works every time, like an impact screwdriver  Lol
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« Reply #132 on: February 04, 2011, 02:38:02 PM »


When trying to remove rusted philips head screws (i.e. carb screws) tap the top of the screwdriver with a hammer while loosening.  Works every time, like an impact screwdriver  Lol


A big hammer always works.
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« Reply #133 on: February 04, 2011, 02:42:53 PM »




Me, I use a bit of grease. But then, that works for everything.  Wink


I buy a few springs @ the hardare store and place them under the nut, they stay there for the life of the battery and you never have to worry about it Smile
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« Reply #134 on: February 04, 2011, 04:05:49 PM »




I buy a few springs @ the hardare store and place them under the nut, they stay there for the life of the battery and you never have to worry about it Smile


That sounds like a good idea too.  The best tips and tricks are ones that will use stuff you already have laying around.   Bigok
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« Reply #135 on: February 04, 2011, 04:53:41 PM »




That sounds like a good idea too.  The best tips and tricks are ones that will use stuff you already have laying around.   Bigok


that's how it started, was looking for something to stick under the nut and there was a spring layingon my bench. worked so good I bought several more Smile
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« Reply #136 on: February 04, 2011, 10:38:45 PM »




I buy a few springs @ the hardare store and place them under the nut, they stay there for the life of the battery and you never have to worry about it Smile


Why couldn't you of posted this up 4 days ago. i was putting the battery back in my snowmobile and it wasn't easy holding the battery and a flat blade screwdriver to hold the nut and trying to turn the bolt with a nother screwdriver.
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« Reply #137 on: April 12, 2011, 03:59:43 PM »

If you wrap an oil filter in sandpaper, you can grip it to get it off.  Works great to get the oil filter back on too!  

No leaks yet, so i know i'm getting it tight enough.  
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« Reply #138 on: April 13, 2011, 06:52:31 AM »

Spring Reattachment

Last weekend I had to reinstall the SW Motech center stand on my SV650 after upgrading the rear shock. This center stand has two springs, one inside the other - a real b*tch to reattach. Lacking a helping hand, I used a ratcheting tie-down strap instead.

First I put the bike in gear and blocked the wheels so it wouldn't roll or slide backwards. I hooked one end of the strap to the trailer hitch on my SUV (any solid anchor point will do). I hooked the other end of the strap directly to the springs, then just ratcheted the strap until the springs were stretched back far enough to reach their notch on the center stand plate.

I used some pliers to guide the springs' hooks down into the notch, then released the tension on the strap. Worked like a charm.
« Last Edit: April 13, 2011, 06:54:36 AM by Scratch33 » Logged

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« Reply #139 on: May 25, 2011, 10:03:03 PM »

Like others have mentioned, my OEM tool kit has grown and has better tools. So to store them I grabbed a leftover Lay's Stax potato chip container and they all fit and it is very durable. It is made out of plastic w/snap lid...not cardboard tube like Pringles container. I just toss it in the trunk of the bike and it has come in handy for me and my riding buddies. :popcorn: :popcorn:
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