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Topic: Jammin is at it again. This time it's more epic than ever!  (Read 13339 times)

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TuffguyF4i
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« Reply #40 on: November 15, 2010, 02:55:11 PM »


You know, besides the job and money fears, this concept of not having a home and more particularily, a kitchen, was a bigger concern to me. I consider myself a homebody as I love to have an adobe to feel peaceful in and cook. I discovered I really need to cook to keep my psyche balanced and during my trip, I've been using CouchSurfing.org a lot. It's a network for travelers where people post up if they are willing to host travelers. It works really well and besides saving me lodging costs, provides a nice insight into local culture. The other big advantage is that I get to live in 'homes' more often than in hotel rooms, which has made the trip all the more comfortable and not tiring. Being from India, everyone wants me to cook some Indian food and I love making my chicken curry for my hosts and that keeps me at peace. I've also met so many cute dogs and cats by staying with people.  Thumbsup

I went to a boarding school all my life (since my dad was working in Africa for the UN and they paid for school), so from a young age, the concept of 'home' became where I am today. I paid attention to this during my preparatory trips to Alaska and Mexico to see if I would miss being 'home' and I didn't. With CouchSurfing and other traveler networks like HorizonsUnlimited, I think I could keep moving for a long time. But I totally understand it's different if you're married and with kids. And that's why I chose to do this now, before those long-term commitments come into play.


And if you're wondering how much I've spent so far: I've spent $5000 in 8 months and 23,000 miles. More than half of that is gas and maintenance for the bike (including an engine change   ). I've spent about $300 on lodging so far and about $700 on food. The savings this year are going to be helpful as I need to continue spending on my masters and Africa next year is going to be more expensive to travel through.


Cool thanks for the info man.  
I have no idea how you can spend so little on food!  Holy cow!  I eat at home 99% of the time and my food bill is around $100-120/wk with my wife and i.  We eat simply too, just lots of protien.  

Anyway...good to hear you're in 1 pc.  Ride safe.
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« Reply #41 on: November 23, 2010, 05:34:09 PM »

Just wanted to let you guys know that I'm going to be interviewed on http://www.SideStandUp.com tonight at 8:20 pm ET. There's an app on the left side of that page to listen live.



I've been talking with Tom at SSU about every 5 weeks or so during my trip and if you're interested in the previous interviews, you can download them from here:

http://jamminglobal.blogspot.com/2010/02/sidestandupcom-interviews.html
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« Reply #42 on: March 29, 2011, 02:20:35 PM »

Hello fellow STNers, I made it across the Atlantic on a cargo boat and now am waiting in Paris for some paperwork to process through (new passport cause I ran out of pages and some visas), so in the down time here, I figured I'd post some of my recent photo journals. If you want to see all of them, here's the thread on ADV or my website.

I'm starting to post from when I entered Argentina in the north, heading down Ruta 40 towards Patagonia.

_____________________________________


Argentina, Part 4: Ruta 40 in the Northwest
December 27 - 28, 2010

Having looped around southern Bolivia, I was now pointed south, heading to Patagonia and Ushuaia, before turning north for Buenos Aires. Argentina is the eight largest country in the world, similar in size to India but with only 40 million people making this one of the least densely populated lands in the world. With a third of the people in the capital and most of the rest in the central industrial belt, there is a lot of open land. The terrain is quite rough, because either it's mountainous in the west or wind-swept by the chilling winds from Patagonia, making this excellent motorcycling country.

I primarily took famed Ruta 40 most of the way down. It's a continuous route heading down the entire spine of the country. In years past, its gravely surface had a gnarly reputation in the motorcycling community, but it's slowly being tamed with asphalt. There's still some adventure to be had in this safe country, where wild camping is easy to do.


Crossing at Paso de Jama from Chile at 4,200 m (13,780 ft).


Blue skies, white clouds and a smiling sun. That sure is an appropriate flag.


My route down Ruta 40 along the western edge of Argentina. Click on it to go to the interactive version in Google Maps.


After the border formalities and filling up the tank with cheaper petrol than in Chile, I headed down to Susques...


...to turn south on Ruta 40. This famous road was gravel all the way to Tierra del Fuego at one point, but slowly over the years, it's being paved over.  


But there's still large sections of good dirt riding left on the old 40.


Northwest Argentina is famous for its colored rocks and striking geology.


A wide angle view as the route dipped down across an arroyo.
Click here to see the high resolution version.


The road was covered in loose gravel, but was well-maintained and corrugations were mostly absent.


A mesa-like structure with wind erosion creating its flanks.


The route climbed high, back into altiplano territory as the vegetation suggested.


Crossing a pass at 4,389 m (14,400 ft) and already getting a good taste for Ruta 40 as it passed through the province of Salta.


The distinct colors of the varied minerals showing through as the route descended from the summit.


It was getting late in the day and the colors were more vivid.


Passing under the Viaducto La Polvorilla, which carries the tracks for the Tren a las Nubes (train to the clouds), a tourist attraction that leaves from Salta and climbs up to the Andean plateau up here.


The clarity of the air at this altitude made the landscape 'pop'.


A wide angle view of the valley that we would descend down towards San Antonio.
Click here to see the high resolution version.


Not a clean stitch, but a wide view of the route following a dry river bed.


Finishing the day with a ride through this canyon, that emptied in...


...the small mountain town of San Antonio de las Cobres. I didn't feel ready to camp again since I didn't stock up on supplies in Chile, so...


...I found a cheap room at Hostal del Cielo for P40 ($10), which included breakfast and kitchen access to prepare dinner. There's not much electricity up here, so the hot water is produced with these solar thermal heaters.


I was the only guest of Mario's, who lives in Salta but runs this hotel with his family for travelers up here. sanDRina enjoyed staying indoors as the winds picked up at night and were quite strong, blowing things around on the street.


The town is pretty run down, but there's a big military base, which probably keeps it going.


Turning back onto Ruta 40 and capturing the highest marked mile marker that I've seen. This route continues south for another 4,626 kms (2,891 mi) ending near Rio Gallegos.


Twisty, narrow, inclined road with dips and falling rocks - a recipe for an adventure.


Climbing up the narrow, cliff-hugging track through the Abra el Acay protected area.


Things were going smoothly as I slowly gained elevation and enjoyed the remoteness.


This doesn't look good. I came into this sandy switch-back at the wrong angle, lost balance and before I could get my foot down, gravity had won and took sanDRina down.


With the adrenaline pumping, I first turned off the ignition and then both fuel petcocks and quickly tried to lift her back up, but she wouldn't budge.


The first real drop of the bike while off-roading of the whole trip. Not bad. But not good that it happened at 4,816 m (15,800 ft) on a remote road, with no local traffic (since there's an alternative paved route around this section). I didn't pass a single car in the previous hour and none looked like it was coming.


I tried lifting her again using the strength of my back, but no go.


I then rotated her, so that the front tire would be pointing downhill and slightly reducing the force needed to fight against gravity.


I still couldn't lift her and finally realized I had to remove as much weight as I could and emptied the panniers and the spare tires. Yard sale on the 40?


And with a good heave, sanDRina woke up from her nap.


I will survive! If push comes to shove, I know I can pick up the bike by myself, but it's going to take at least an hour to repack everything on the bike.


All set to go again and the nicely graded sand looked like a battle scene. Since I was pointing downhill, I had to back track a bit and attack this corner again with the proper line to put down any doubts.


Looking back at the way I came as Ruta 40 climbed up this pass. My oopsie happened in one of those hairpin turns on the left.


At the summit of the Abra el Acay at 4,970 m (16,300 ft). I was heading to Cachi.


Wide view of the route descending down the other side.


Resembling my favorite roads of northern Peru and Bolivia, Ruta 40 hugged the steep, rocky cliffs of this colorful landscape.


The route was wider than similar roads in the above countries, but...
Click here to see the high resolution version.


...with no guard rails and a loose, sandy, rocky surface, one fall could be the end.


However, thoughts like that don't surface to the front when you're actually there. You just get on with it and keep going forward. Let the GoPro take the pictures.


A hairpin turn and successive others dropping down into the valley.


Going from this side to that side.


Looking back at the summit of Abra el Acay.


And looking forward as the route followed the ever growing Rio Calchaqui.


A syncline in the rocks, where the younger sedimentary layers are surrounded by older ones.


One of numerous small water crossings as the route crossed back and forth from one side of the valley to the other across Rio Calchaqui.


Coming across the first few settlements, which slowly turned into farms.


A wide view of Ruta 40 in the Rio Bravo valley.


Besides the small river, it was dry and the route was sandy in places...


...but generally, the route was in good condition, allowing for some good speeds.


A crumbling wall of a farm set below the colorful mountains of Northwest Argentina.


A big cactus plant, reminding me of the tall saguaro cactus outside Dave's house in Phoenix, Arizona.


A panorama capturing the vivid color palette of this area.
Click here to see the high resolution version.


Esquina Azul (blue corner), how aptly named.


After passing through some farmland, the route became interesting again as it followed atop a canyon.


I didn't see a sign around but I bet these spiky, upturned layers of rock would be called El Spina del Diablo (the devil's spine). I'd love to have some farmland with such striking backdrops.


As I ate some lunch under the shade of this tree, these two young boys came by herding their goats. Argentina has a reputation of being predominantly white, which it is, but not much is heard about Argentina's brown residents, the indigenous people, who have lived here in these mountains for hundreds or even thousands of years.  


I watched them as they directed their herd across this flowing stream, lending a helping hand to a young kid (baby goat).


The beautiful ride through this multi-colored canyon made for an enjoyable day on the 40.


Farmlands increased as the terrain flattened out and the route got closer to Cachi.


Passing through the sleepy little town of Cachi, in the middle of a wine renaissance.


I topped up petrol and fresh water and then set out in search for a place to camp for the night.


Passing by a very narrow canyon cut through the rock.


This farm house looked deserted and as I pulled up, an old lady, the caretaker (who was living with her family in a small hut in the back) came up and I asked if I could camp here for the night, which was no problem, since the owners were away in Salta and rarely came here anymore.


I found a nice spot under this tree and the old lady brought me a 5 liter can of water, with which I managed to have a small bath and cook my dinner with.


There was abundant firewood around and she said I could use whatever I wanted. All the camping I had done up to now was mainly to take shelter for the night and no campfires were made as I didn't want to advertise my position. However, Argentina is a safe country with an established camping culture and I could finally make campfires.


Now, that's an inviting home... to a nomad on a motorcycle.


I got my stove going to cook up some dinner as I didn't want to put my pots on the campfire, since the soot would make a mess of my gear.


Ahhh. It was around 2,100 m (6,890 ft) and with no wind, it was very comfortable in the evening and I could enjoy staying outdoors with minimal clothing, making it very comfortable (compared to the rough conditions on the Lagunas Route). It is times like this, that I most feel like a nomad.


Even with a fall at high-altitude, the feeling of being around a warm fire soothed all ills.

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« Reply #43 on: March 29, 2011, 02:38:05 PM »

I've been following at ADVrider.  I highly recommend keeping track of Jay's travels.  

Good luck Jay, keep it up.

- Dan
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« Reply #44 on: March 30, 2011, 07:00:32 AM »

Thanks Dan  Thumbsup

________________________________


Argentina, Part 5: Central Ruta 40 | Cachi to Mendoza
December 29, 2010 - January 1, 2011

Getting good vibrations from northwest Argentina (not just from the corrugations), I continued south on Ruta 40 from Cachi across the middle of the country, down to Mendoza, making it there in time for New Years.


From Cachi, Ruta 40 goes through some remote terrain. As there are paved alternatives for the locals, the ride remains a destination.


The route hugs the tight crevasses of the hillsides and dips in and out quite sharply, making for an engaging ride. It gets narrow in places, like passing under this boulder-hewn wall, evident of past flash floods carrying big rocks and boulders down from the eroding Andes.


The little stream up in the mountains of yesterday had now grown into a proper river and Rio Calchaqui was supporting a blanket of green spreading from its banks into these farms.


Between Molinos and Angastaco, geologic forms stand out right by the road.


Heading into the Corte el Canon.


A narrow canyon with spires of rock.


These flat layers have been pushed up and out of the ground by the giant forces constantly at work deep underneath our feet.


Back in Cafayate and I stopped at the same little shack from my trip heading north for a lunch of some emapandas.


The vineyards of Cafayate with the tall Andes to the west.


From Cafayate till the Lake District, Ruta 40 stays out of the high Andes and cuts across the flat lands in its shadows.


It's not all paved, yet, and once in a while the route goes up and over a small ridge with the terrain being generally dry.


This dry land is punctuated by rivers flowing out of the mountains and with the rainy season started in the north, arroyos provided for fun water crossings. This is where you need a riding buddy, to take pictures of you splashing across the stream.


Stopping for the night in the small town of Haulfin. The owner of this hospedaje told me of the various other Ruta 40 travelers that had stopped here over the years. Traversing the length of this road is popular with travelers from around the world.


From here south, Ruta 40 was mostly paved and after a short section of curves through this canyon...


...it's defined by ultra-long stretches with no turns for about 20 - 30 kms (12 - 19 mi) at a time.


With only a few towns here and there, the route was heading south as efficiently as possible.


I yearned to be back riding in the mountains, but knew that that time would come soon.


Prepare for the Dakar!


A billboard in the town of Chilecito proud to host the famous Dakar Rally Race. It was starting in just a few days from Buenos Aires and would pass through here in about a week. The race moved to South America after security threats in northern Africa and is hugely popular among all the gearheads of this continent. The buildup to the race is quite big here and people would come up to me and say, "Vamos al Dakar" (let's go to the Dakar). I could probably enter in the truck category, seeing that I'm carrying my support vehicle with me.


Time not being on my side, I continued on. A road sign indicating 4,000 kms (2,500 mi) to Ushuaia.


From Nonogasta, the route heads over this strikingly red mountain.


The red stands out all the more in contrast to the greens of the valley below with Rio Miranda and the blues of distant mountains.


Even without the striking colors, the valley is quite impressive.


There's a short section of off-road as it goes up and over a small pass.


A wider view of the red canyon.


End of the twisting road as it descended down from the pass.


And back to our regular programming of straight-as-an-arrow empty roads under big, blue skies with white, fluffy clouds.


The excitement picked up as the route gained some relief and became defined by 'badenes', the dipping down and up over the numerous arroyos that are characteristic of this area. In the rainy season, water flows down the hillsides and instead of being collected in one river, the wide slopes allow the water to run where ever it wants and being impractical to build a bridge over every possible arroyo, the road simply drops down into the arroyo.


Near San Jose de Jachal, there's an older route that goes up and over the scenic ridge of La Cienega, compared to the newer Ruta 40 that goes around it.


It's a narrow, paved road, covered in heaps of falling rocks.


And a tunnel ride taking you from the scenic canyon back to the bland landscape on the other side.


I pitched my tent in the municipal campground, just outside the town of San Jose de Jachal. It was free and I think it's mainly a day-use place but I asked some locals if it was all right to camp and got the go ahead. There was a basic bathroom nearby and the trademark Argentine place for an assado. The straight roads made quick work of the big land and I covered 530 kms (330 mi) today.


Having some chocolate oatmeal for breakfast, which was my daily morning food for the past few years in the US, much to the consternation of my colleagues. I'm missing some walnuts, raisins and coconut to make this some truly gourmet oatmeal. Minus the chocolate, this is a good traveling food as it's cheap, easily available all through Latin America, healthy and being a complex carbohydrate, its energy is slowly released over a few hours instead of the sudden release of glucose from simple carbs like those in white bread.


As I left town, I was hailed down by these guys from the local TV station. They had seen me yesterday driving through town and figured I would make a good lifestyle segment to their daily newscast. They interviewed me for about 15 minutes and I told them my story. Being from India always adds a novelty factor and I was complimented on my Spanish. I asked them to send me a copy so that I could proudly show my parents.


It had rained the previous night and knowing this to be arroyo-land, I was expecting some water crossings.


However, the damage was much worse with the muddy water flowing over the road and depositing debris for a stretch of about 20 kms (12 mi). The TV crew were actually on their way down the road to report on the overnight damage done to the 40 with cars skidding off the mud into the ditch. Earth movers were also dispatched to push the errant mud off the tarmac.


This is an arroyo gone bad. Instead of following the rules and flowing under the little bridge, the heavy rain-induced flows swept across this whole area, removing ground from under the train tracks and carrying all that mud onto the road.


And here was the biggest water crossing with water flowing across a flat section of the road. After seeing a Toyota Hilux go through and seeing that it was less than a foot deep, I powered across.


After the excitement of the morning, the route quieted down and it was a relatively quick ride to Mendoza.


I spent New Years Eve with Alejandro and his family in Mendoza, through CouchSurfing. He runs a pharmacy below his house and recently got addicted to traveling by road. He purchased a motor home in Spain and plans to travel for six months through Europe and asked me questions on where he could continue with his travels. I took a few days off, replaced the clutch on sanDRina and prepared for the next leg.
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« Reply #45 on: April 05, 2011, 08:55:06 AM »

Patagonia, Part 1: Argentine Lake District
January 3 - 9, 2011

Patagonia, a distant land at the end of South America. An image of pristine, natural beauty sweeping to the horizon. Only recently settled by modern people, its vastness is still its trademark impression. Having Antarctica close by keeps the year-round temperatures cooler than similar latitudes in the northern hemisphere and the unbroken chain of the Andes all the way to Tierra del Fuego creates two distinct Patagonias: the wet and green side on Chile and the dry and flat side on the eastern rain shadow in Argentina.

In Northern Patagonia, which starts below Mendoza, both sides of the Andes are blessed with lush temperate forests with numerous lakes created by glaciers resulting in the Lakes District. Its popularity with international and local travelers makes it a highly touristic region, but still worthy of a visit by nature lovers. That being said, all the major attractions in Patagonia could be considered touristy, but that doesn't diminish the feeling of awe for the natural beauty and outside the urban areas, it's still one of the most remote places to travel in the world.


I set off from Mendoza in the new year of 2011, south on Ruta 40, which is now paved for the most part.


I watched this thunder cell move across the horizon and right into my path. Instead of waiting 30 minutes for it to pass, I suited up in all my rain gear and rode in, only to be thrashed around by the strong winds and pelted with the force of a water cannon.


The sky cleared up and I had about 1,200 kms (750 mi) to cover before getting to the Lake District.


At the municipal campground in Malargüe. In contrast to all the other Latin American countries (Chile included), Argentina has a well-developed camping culture among the general populace. Families make camping road trips along Ruta 40 and mostly stay at the municipal campgrounds that are in every town in the region. These are sites for pitching a tent, rather than picturesque camping locations, but they're the most affordable form of accommodation in pricey Patagonia. A tent site here cost P30 ($7.50), which includes a hot shower and electrical outlets and firewood, if available.


The next morning, heading into another rain storm. This is the best time to visit (the height of summer), but Patagonia is no usual land, with strong winds and storms common throughout the year. It's just that it's less cold now for a few months with no ice on the ground.


Ok, I take that back. You can come across ice year-round. I crossed a small ridge, only peaking around 2,000 m (6,560 ft) but that was enough for the chilling temperatures to freeze the falling precipitation into hail.


It looks like snow, but is actually small balls of ice and having never ridden through a hail storm before, it was a strange experience to be pelted softly from all sides. If it wasn't for the near-freezing temperatures, it could've been an enjoyable massage. The heavy duty Kevlar fiber of my Motoport suit was adequate protection.


Hail on the ground, but not a significant amount to affect mobility.


As I came down the other side, the slightly warmer temperatures turned the hail back into water and an unpaved section...


...lead to riding through small streams of mud.


The good thing about the strong winds is that the storms go as quickly as they come.


Two sheep by the road side, slowly being claimed back by the land.


Taking a break and noting the black lava rocks and small shrubs covering the land.


The road was neglected in places and with no major towns around with very little traffic on this remote route, it can be expected. I much prefer a proper dirt road than deteriorating pavement.


The Argentine side of Patagonia is defined by a series of steppes; wind-swept plateaus that are devoid of much vegetation. The temperatures were around 16 C (61 F) with wind chills on the bike at speed at around 10C (50 F) or less.


Rain storms moving across the horizon. I was looking forward to a warm shower.


At the municipal campground in Chos Malal on Rio Neuquén, I met these two brothers, Juan and Cocho from Bariloche who were on a trip to the northern end of Ruta 40 on 70cc Motomel Chinese mopeds. They were doing this during their summer break and would head to Buenos Aires to continue university studies. The poor chaps could only achieve a maximum of 70 kph (44 mph) with the wind behind them and said they chugged along at 25 kph (15 mph) on the long uphill stretches. They had limited mechanical experience but knew better and were carrying spare pistons, expecting the tiny motors to give out at some point. They were envying sanDRina and all the goodies on her, yet they knew that it's the journey that's important, not your mode of transportation.


And they look some solace in seeing the maintenance I had to do to sanDRina. In the afternoon, I noticed an oil leak from the top of the engine.  


After setting up camp, I investigated and found the root-cause to be hardened gaskets in the valve inspection covers. I had removed these covers in Mendoza to do a routine valve clearance check and didn't inspect the status of the gaskets upon reassembly. They had hardened over time and were not providing any compression resistance anymore between the valve cover and the cylinder head, which is required to provide a good oil seal. I broke the seal when I did the valve check and oil was subsequently slowly seeping out. I made a temporary gasket with RTV silicone and that would do the trick until I could get a hold of some new gaskets.


Continuing south from Chos Malal on a beautiful day in Patagonia.


Taking a break among a rare grove of trees.


'Patagonia. Wish you were here.' A mile marker indicating 2,300 kms (1,430 mi) left to Tierra del Fuego.


The land is naturally devoid of any flora taller than a shrub,  and the only trees were those around farm houses. Sheep, introduced from the Falkland Islands, are the mainstay of estancias (ranches) that span all of Patagonia.


The road twisted up and down big ridges and valleys.


I love big skies and enjoyed staring at the clouds over big distances and making out shapes of dogs, dragons and DRs.


A wide view of an expansive valley and surrounding steppes.
Click here to see the high resolution version.


And just like that the scenery changed into forests of evergreens and I knew I was in the Lake District. I passed the first town of Junin de Los Andes and...


...found a nice campsite in San Martín de Los Andes.


Having more sunlight as the latitudes rise, I bought some veggies for a bit more elaborate dinner. How do you like the little Lexan cutting board?


Cooking up some red bell peppers with onions and peas.


Served up with polenta, a cheap corn-meal food widely available in Argentina (coming from Italian influence).


A shot of my food bag with lots of oatmeal and some pasta.


A view of the stylish town of San Martín on the shores of Lago Lacar. It's a popular destination for Argentines on holiday and January is the traditional month of travel for most families.


From San Martín, the scenic Ruta de los Siete Lagos (7 lakes route) meanders through Parque Nacional Lanín. It's fame has grown over the years and the road was crowded with enthusiastic hikers, bicyclists and family cars.


Regardless of the crowds, the scenery is stunning and to be so close to deep blue lakes is a wonderful feeling.


The snow-capped Andes of Parque Nacional Lanín.


A waterfall on Rio Hermoso (Beautiful River).


At the lookout point for the waterfall, I attracted a lot of attention and prompted questions about my trip from the other park visitors. Argentines are very friendly people and this group of friends from Buenos Aires who were on a multi-day cycling trip chatted me up with questions on India and the trip down the Americas.


A tree leaning into Lago Villarino.


A volcano on the border with Chile looking over Lago Villarino.


The waters are super clear and change colors depending on the particular minerals in each lake.


Reducing air pressure as the road got bumpy over a stretch still under construction through the park.


The off-road was mild and will probably be paved within the year.


Having a lunch break by this flowing river.


A wide view of Lago Correntoso.


Getting to my next destination, the town of Villa La Angostura (meaning town by the narrows).


The town is on the shores of massive Lago Nahuel Huapi, part of the national park of the same name. Elevation is 2,510 feet (770 m).


I met up with Gustavo thru CouchSurfing and he showed me the sights around town. A tour boat heading to the Arrayanes Forest from Bahia La Mansa.


Looking through the shallow water reflecting in the sunshine.


Life must be good on the shores of Lago Nahuel Huapi with a backdrop of snow-capped mountains.


And it's better with a motorcycle. Gustavo is an avid off-road rider and that's his KTM 450 EXC.


Villa La Angostura is a small town that has recently boomed due to tourism, but it's still charming and...


...is known for its numerous chocolatiers, resembling Swiss mountain towns.


I treated myself to a bag of assorted chocolates and could eat many, many more. They covered all sorts of things with chocolate and fudges in a variety of flavors. The discs are ginger snaps. Mmm.


Gustavo in his downtown graphics and sign-making business. He purchased a small 70cc Motomel off-road bike for his 8 year old nephew and was in the process of turning the bike into a look-alike KTM so the young rider could look like his uncle.


A shot of a typical Argentine bathroom, where the bidet is still in popular use. It's a remnant from their strong European cultural influence. Its use has died down in the western world, but is still going strong in many other areas. Personally, I prefer to use water rather than paper to clean up down there. It's easier on the skin, more sanitary (since paper does not remove all of the waste) and more environmentally friendly (since paper takes a lot of water to make and trees need to be felled). The other issue in favor of water is the strange requirement in Latin America of putting the soiled toiler paper in an external basket, rather than in the toilet bowl. The plumbing of the sewage system, from colonial days, is too small to handle paper, so now that habit is part of the culture today.


Gustavo and his finished KTM makeover of the Motomel outside his mountain-style home.


From Villa La Angostura, I continued along the shores of Lago Nahuel Huapi.


Distracting views.


I passed through the Lake District's biggest city of San Carlos de Bariloche and stopped for lunch with a fantastic view of the Nahuel Huapi Lake.


The ride through this whole area is well-worth dealing with the increased traffic due to its popularity.


Near the town of El Bolson with steep mountains showing the gradual fade from trees, through the treeline to bare rock.


Taking a dip in Lago Puelo, south of El Bolson. There was a place to camp near the lake and the clear waters tempted me in. It was cold, for sure, but refreshing all the same.


South of El Bolson, Ruta 40 exits the Lake District and we're back to the wind-swept steppes of Patagonia.


The mountains were far away and I wished there was a route through them.


I stocked up on supplies and petrol in Esquel, the last town before crossing into Chile.


Getting back into the mountains and feeling energized by the flowing waters.


At the Rio Grande Argentine border crossing, which gives you road access to the Carretera Austral.
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« Reply #46 on: September 16, 2011, 10:13:20 AM »

Hello STNers, here's a new video from my ride across the Alps, from Switzerland into Italy. This was shot in early May, so snow still on the ground near the high passes. A beautiful ride through alpine country, best savored on two wheels  Bigsmile

Set to some funk by Roy Ayers. Enjoy...


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« Reply #47 on: September 23, 2011, 12:12:25 PM »

Now that's an awesome ride  Cool
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« Reply #48 on: September 23, 2011, 12:54:53 PM »

awesome thread. Thumbsup
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The Wrath of Con Pt. 4 "One thing is for sure however, I will never publicly promote or let it be known that I am a member of STN again".
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« Reply #49 on: September 23, 2011, 01:50:57 PM »

He's way more up to date on advrider.  Been following him over there for what seems like forever.

- Dan
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airstash.com - check it out!
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« Reply #50 on: September 23, 2011, 01:51:47 PM »

Fantastic report Jammin. One of the best ever.  Bigok
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« Reply #51 on: May 11, 2012, 09:04:27 AM »


Now that's an awesome ride  Cool


awesome thread. Thumbsup


He's way more up to date on advrider.  Been following him over there for what seems like forever.
- Dan


Fantastic report Jammin. One of the best ever.  Bigok

Hey guys, thanks a lot!

__________________________

Video: Jammin thru Ethiopia | Off-roading in the Simien Mountains on a Suzuki DR650

Here's the latest release from Jammin Vidds Production > a video of my off-road ride through the Ethiopian Highlands. I rode the Simien Mountains from Debark, north to Shire, gaining and dropping lots of elevation. It was the rainy season and there was ongoing construction, so lots of muddy crossings. The video starts off with some cliff riding on the beautifully built road near Debark and then slows down for some soupy mud before picking up the pace towards the end. sanDRina was running in top form.

We be Jammin, so turn up the volume and enjoy some funky Afro Beats from Femi Kuti Smile


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