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Topic: 100CCC Planning: Route and Gear Check  (Read 1925 times)

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Blondebaerde
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« on: August 08, 2010, 01:38:22 PM »

I am planning an IBA 100CCC Insanity ride for September 6-10, 2010, (PM Monday 9/6 through late PM Friday 9/10) and would appreciate comment on routes, I-40 vs. I-10, given my start point of Santa Barbara.  

At-current, I am thinking Santa Barbara, CA to Tybee Island, GA (Georgia coast) and back again, in less than 100 hours.  (I have pals in SB to visit beforehand, else would start in SD.  I realize this involves an extra several hundred miles vs. SD to JXN Beach, r/t).  Primary route east will be I-40 to Memphis, TN, then SE on other major highways.  Call this the I-40 Route.

An alternative is Santa Barbara to Jacksonville Beach, FL; call this the I-10 route.  Per Google Maps, road distance is almost identical to the I-40 Route.

There are many online accounts of 100CCC adventures.  I am in the process of fully-digesting what I've found so far, and preparing well ahead in terms of gear, fitness, and proper attitude.  I realize the gravity and challenge of the endeavor.

As background, I have completed SS1000 and SS2000 on a Honda Blackbird (CBR1100XX), approved and certified by IBA.  For the 100CCC, I intend to take my new Ducati Multistrada (MTS1200), with about 4K miles on the odo at-start.  If I'm successful, I may be one of the few Ducatis to complete this particular ride.

While I am well-traveled in the western, central, and eastern U.S., I don't recall ever being on I-40 or I-10 for any distance east of Texas.  Questions for the group:

1.  At this time, I-40 appears to be the wiser route due to concerns about excessive heat in the extreme south on I-10.  I have compiled a historical temperature map for early September in major cities on both routes.  The average temp is 7 degrees F cooler on I-40, (though there are more extreme hi-lo averages).  I did not map average humidity.

Is there any reason, generally, why I-40 may or may not be more interesting, more hazardous, etc. vs. I-10, for those with more experience droning on these highways?  

2.  Do I need my Gerbing heated liner?  Thinking not, though I'm torn given I don't want to pack useless gear.  However, when needed (below about 45F), it is immensely useful.  The Multi has heated grips so that's not a concern.  My primary riding gear is my Aerostich Roadcrafter.   Footwear, gloves, and etc. are already well-covered.

Comments appreciated!

-=BB
Seattle, WA, USA
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KKop
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« Reply #1 on: August 11, 2010, 10:17:52 PM »

You know you're nuts, right?   Bigsmile

I rode I-40 from Santa Fe to Memphis a few weeks ago.  The thing that stood out most was the relentless side winds in Texas, which made passing big rigs trickier than usual.  Other than that, no real problems

Not sure what you're planning after that?  

I rode Memphis to Birmingham over US78 (which will one day be I-22).  If you are planning that: that route will take you from I-40, through the outskirts of Memphis, some of it on city streets, then on US78 (fast four-lane highway) all the way to Birmingham, then on city streets in Birmingham to I-20.  I hit the city streets at busy times of the day, and the going was pretty slow.  Also, a lot of construction on I-20 near Birmingham.

If riding it at night, I would personally be most worried about wildlife on that stretch between Memphis and Birmingham, which is surrounded by woods almost the whole way.   And possibly sightings of Elvis near Tupelo :-)

Good luck with the trip, stay safe!

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I see what you did there.




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« Reply #2 on: September 02, 2010, 02:58:54 AM »


Do I need my Gerbing heated liner?


Probably not.



But it can't hurt to take it anyway.   Wink

Ride safe, ride hard.  I wish I could go, too.
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« Reply #3 on: September 21, 2010, 10:10:16 PM »

Were you able to complete your ride
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Blondebaerde
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« Reply #4 on: November 27, 2010, 01:17:29 PM »

Successful Failure Report:

After reflection, my ego can withstand reporting a "successful failure" IB run attempted mid-September 2010.  Successful Failure indicating:

1.  Did not achieve planned IB objectives.
2.  Did, however, have a fantastic riding vacation.
3.  Survived.

(Think Apollo 13: a few terrifying hours, loss of sleep, and cold; but hey: they did manage to orbit the moon, and made it home).

In short, as mentioned top-of-thread, I planned a 100CCC (100 hours, coast-to-coast and back), but did not complete the run.  My planned route was Santa Barbara, CA to Tybee Island, GA.  

To make a long story short, I bailed at 1,100 miles, day one.  Just got tired, nodded off briefly several times, and pulled the goalie by checking into a motel in the Texas panhandle.  Got up about six hours later and decided to have a nice trip in northern New Mexico, Arizona, and Vegas instead.  Took a couple days through spectacular scenery in that area, en route back to Santa Barbara, total mileage in three days about 2,500.

I didn't feel too bad about blowing off the 100CCC, since I love NM, AZ, and NV.  Any chance to bum around there, I'll take, which included a lot of sniffing around old Rt. 66: a recommended detour, if you have time and inclination to see the ruins of an era that came and went in only about 40 years (pre-Interstate).  Almost looks like an old Roman Road ruin in Europe, anymore.

Any failure requires analysis, which may be interesting and cautionary for others:

Planning the route: exemplary.  That's what I do for a living (in IT).  No "battle plan" survives contact with "the enemy," but mine held up great for the leg I did complete and kept the thinking minimized, pace maximized.  Planning distances between stops and gas stations, programing all into the GPS (with paper backup), testing everything thoroughly beforehand, made the route that much less to worry about.  No trouble there.

Mechanical: new 2010 Ducati Multistrada, with 4,500 miles on the ODO at trip start.  Broken in, well-understood in capabilities, with good rubber.  Not a lick of trouble there, either, score another one for planning and prep.  Multiple 300 mile days beforehand.

Attitude: this was the problem.  When I got very tired and started to nod off, c. 18 hours in, I didn't really care about continuing or rallying for "the goal."  My thoughts were mostly around, "why am I doing this thing, that I am not enjoying?"

Solo: I am a do-it-yourself kind of guy.  However, riding with fellow nuts on this adventure probably would have motivated me to keep going for "the team."  I don't let buddies down, or the unit, to complete the mission.  This was a significant error in planning: there were no "consequences" to quitting.  

Physical:  I'm a hardy fellow, but I've also been in better shape in previous years.  Were I as athletically-toned as years past, I probably wouldn't have tired so much by mile 1,100.

Bit off too much:  open for debate.  I probably should have progressed to a less-extreme extreme ride as the "next" goal, and gauged my response.  I likely would have discovered it wasn't so interesting, and stopped.  BunBurner Gold seems like the next logical jump-off point after SaddleSore 1000 and 2000, and makes-or-breaks many a rider.  

My personal learning and takeaways:

1.  1,000 miles in one day is a stretch for most.  I've seen guys push themselves a bit, make this goal, and call it good.  Turns out, though I did not know it, that about 1,100 miles in 24 hours is all I can comfortably do and still "have fun" while maintaining the edge.  

= Find your own limits before starting a multi-day, 1000+ mile per day adventure.

2.  It was both good and bad I started in an area of the country I love.  I did not hesitate to abort the mission to ride more of the Southwest.  

= adjust your attitude beforehand.  Do you want to do this IB run, and/or are you on a riding vacation?  For me, answer (should have been), "Absolutely, and absolutely!"  Not, "Yeah, I guess; and absolutely!"

3.  Planning of routes and gear, and ensuring the bike is mechanically sound, are never bad ideas.  Research, question, and take your time to prep.  I have first-rate gear for most conditions, and used much of it, yet did not overpack.

4.  I may have discovered I'm not into IB riding anymore, if I ever was: I'm more of a 'climb the mountain, move on to the next one, don't look back' sort of guy.  The SS1000 and SS2000 were deceptively doable in comparison to the next major leap I attempted.  I may or may not take a step back and try a BB Gold in 2011 or beyond, now that I know the "fun factor" for me personally goes way down after about 1,100 miles in one day.  At this instant I am undecided though winter is just beginning to unfold and I have about five months to ponder.  If I go, I will recruit at least one additional loose nut to go-with.

Like any extreme event, or sport, a person really and truly has to "wanna" get 'er done.  In the end, the decision should boil down to one thing and one thing only: Nosce te ipsum.

Know Thyself.

Thanks for reading.  I was very fortunate to be letdown easily, and had a blast in the process.  No regrets.
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Huron52
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« Reply #5 on: November 28, 2010, 07:12:08 PM »


 Nice to know that you know when to call it.  

Maybe with some more planning you can maybe do it again.

 A friend of mine did the Canadian coast to coast ride this past summer. Halifax NS to Vancouver BC in 70 some hours. Under the requirement for sure.

 I have done few 1000 mile days and some of my  friends and relatives think that I am nuts.  I have thought of doing a  50CC but I haven't gotten the nerve.
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