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Topic: What to do about tubeless radial flat tire?  (Read 2205 times)

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1moreroad
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« on: March 16, 2007, 01:58:34 PM »

So more and more adventure bikes are running tubeless radial tires.  The Ulysses is marketed for gravel roads but runs sportbike size tires.  Egan did his Prudhoe Bay to Key West ride on a Multi-strada with sportbike size tires.

Do the D216s and the Pirelli Scorpions actually provide a little more puncture resistance than D208s or Corsas?

What do you do about a flat tire off in the middle of nowhere?  Are flats other than small rock punctures in the tread of the tire unlikely on gravel roads?  Do you just hope you get nothing more than a flat that can be fixed with a plug and some air?
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R.Markus

« Reply #1 on: March 16, 2007, 02:25:12 PM »

A lot of people that run those types of tires run that green slime stuff. Apparently it can plug some pretty big holes. The downside is that if you need to do a more extensive repair, that slime is extremely messy. Another thing is to take along tire irons and patches. You can remove the tire part way and patch it. Patches will fix a larger hole than most plugs will.

Having tubes can be a PITA, but in this situation it is nice to only have to swap a new tube for the punctured one.
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« Reply #2 on: March 16, 2007, 05:47:24 PM »



A lot of people that run those types of tires run that green slime stuff. Apparently it can plug some pretty big holes. The downside is that if you need to do a more extensive repair, that slime is extremely messy. Another thing is to take along tire irons and patches. You can remove the tire part way and patch it. Patches will fix a larger hole than most plugs will.



I think I'd carry a set of  patches and tire irons just to be safe vs running green slime.  What would you do in this scenario?  You got a flat and the slime won't plug the leak.  Now you have to patch tire.  Will the patch hold now that the inside of the tire has been coated with slime?
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« Reply #3 on: March 16, 2007, 06:07:04 PM »

Check here.  I've used my Genuine Innovations repair kit twice with great success.

http://www.sport-touring.net/forums/index.php/topic,5447.0.html
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R.Markus

« Reply #4 on: March 16, 2007, 08:19:58 PM »





I think I'd carry a set of  patches and tire irons just to be safe vs running green slime.  What would you do in this scenario?  You got a flat and the slime won't plug the leak.  Now you have to patch tire.  Will the patch hold now that the inside of the tire has been coated with slime?


I've heard that you can patch the tire, but it is a huge pain to clean it well enough to do so.
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« Reply #5 on: March 16, 2007, 11:38:05 PM »

Patching a tire is not hard at all.  Only hard if you slime or hit a tire with Fix a Flat.  Even then, the materials are water soluable and clean up with adequate soap and water.
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« Reply #6 on: March 21, 2007, 01:25:03 PM »

If you're planning a super-remote ride (read: self-rescue or no-rescue), you can always bring along a tube.  It's possible to run tubeless tires with a tube in them, just not vice-versa.


For daily riding, tubeless is sweet.  Pick up a nail, use a "string" patch, and you can be underway in a couple of minutes.  Tubes are a bigger PITA to change (pull wheel, break bead, remove/patch tube, replace tube, reseat bead, reinstall wheel).

Get a big gash or slice, though, and it could be trouble if you're in the middle of nowhere.



 
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« Reply #7 on: March 21, 2007, 07:18:25 PM »

Really good idea about carrying an emergency "tube".
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« Reply #8 on: March 21, 2007, 11:00:36 PM »


Really good idea about carrying an emergency "tube".



Thanks.  I guess I should also mention that if you've got front and rear wheels that are different sizes (common on "trailies"), a front (larger) tube will fit either wheel in a pinch (pun intended). i.e. if you've got a 19" front, 17"rear, and only want to carry one tube, make it a 19".


Also, it's a_very_good idea to practice your tire changing routine beforehand (read: at home).  There's a definite technique to using tire irons in conjunction with a tube -- I've pinched more than my fair share, believe me!

There's an excellent tire changing thread here: http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=50717

If you're just stuffing a tube in a fubar'd tire, you only need to pull one side of the bead over the rim.  You will, however, need to pull the tubeless valve stem out.  



One other thing I meant to mention earlier -- the original poster noted that so many "trailes" are now coming with tubeless tires.  I equate this to the SUV phenomenon  for cages: the vast majority of these bikes will never see serious offroad action (just like their SUV brethren), so tubeless works fine.  If someone is contemplating serious offroad action (think LongWayRound or the like), I'd advocate using tubes and tires/rims intended for them.  Perhaps foremost, they allow you to run lower tire pressures which are very helpful in loose conditions; and tubes are definitely the native standard throughout the developing world -- meaning repair will be that much easier.
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« Reply #9 on: March 21, 2007, 11:32:43 PM »

Only gravel roads, nothing more.  It looks like some of the Alaska outfits will rent Buell Ulysses to run the haul road up to Prudhoe Bay.  I figure if they can do it on 17" sportbike tires, so can I.  Wink

Thanks for all the ideas.  I've got a year to plan the trip, but it's always fun to start thinking about it.

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I equate this to the SUV phenomenon  for cages: the vast majority of these bikes will never see serious offroad action (just like their SUV brethren), so tubeless works fine.


The flip side of this is that people think you need to have a serious SUV to do so much as drive down a dirt road.  Look at where VW Bugs continue to be driven all around the world and you know that's not true.
« Last Edit: March 21, 2007, 11:34:33 PM by 1moreroad » Logged

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