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Topic: Street Triple service costs and complexity?  (Read 6957 times)

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nevinfs327
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« on: September 16, 2011, 02:33:25 PM »

I posted a thread in region 1 looking for Triumph shop recommendations after getting what I thought was a high quote for my 24k service.  I've since spoken with several others and received similarly high quotes.  Since there are several Street Triple owners on this site racking up miles I thought I'd ask about service costs and check to see if anyone has done the job themselves.  I've done a little looking around on the other Street Triple forums but haven't found anything really useful yet.  More searching to be done for sure, but I really don't like the other forums layout, nor does it seem that many people have racked up a lot of miles on their 675s yet.

Back to my question areas:

Servicing costs - I've been quoted $900-1100 for parts and labor after calling a half dozen shops in the Bay Area.  After asking questions to get to the bottom of the price disparity I've learned that those charging $1100 are going by the checklist in the owners manual, and those that are cheaper tend to skip things like changing fork oil, brake fluid and parts that may not need to be changed like air filters and brake pads.  I'm fine with those things not being done, but would expect more of a discount.  The majority of the cost is clearly in the 8 hours of labor Triumph dealers are told to budget.  

I was surprised by the high cost because I expected it to be inline with my 12k service which was ~$650 IIRC.  I now wonder what items they may have skipped and not told me about to keep the cost low.  I haven't called them to find out since they are no longer a viable option for me, now that I'm on the opposite coast.  

What have others paid for the 12k and 24k services?

DIY service - Given the cost, I'm debating doing the service myself.  I'm comfortable with everything up through the valve adjustment.  I really don't want to do a valve adjustment since I'll have to pull the cams and there is waiting time for the shims.  I don't have any workspace in my dirty, cramped, shared garage so I'd have to complete the process in a single day.  Not a problem as long as the valves don't actually need adjusted.  I would still need to take it to the dealer for the TPS and electronic stuff, but the bike is running great so I'm not worried about those things really.  

Has anyone here done their own major service on a 675?  Have the dealer services turned anything up with the electronic diagnosis?  I just ordered a Haynes manual so will see how it describes the process and tool needs.  

I suppose I should note that I've done almost all of my own servicing for 15 years, the only exceptions being my 675 12k service and a valve adjustment on my old Superhawk.  Unfortunately most of my tools are still in New Jersey and my garage is less than ideal for any real internal engine work.



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« Reply #1 on: September 16, 2011, 03:46:18 PM »

I haven't gotten to the 24k yet on my Street Triple R, nor have I self-performed any valve checks.  I didn't realize it was an 8hr job "by the book."  The 12k for me was about $500, all-inclusive by the dealer.  The 6k and 18k were about $170 each.  This is not including brake pads and tires.

When I had my Tiger 1050, the 24k was around $500 at the dealer, IIRC.

The listed hours for a valve adjustment at this review and the related Daytona review show 2.75.

I recall STN member Just_Peekn did a Street Triple valve check at 24k - link.

It wouldn't hurt to post this up on triumphrat.net or tirumph675.net.  

Have you asked what labor rate you are being quoted?  It may be related to the higher quoted costs.
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« Reply #2 on: September 16, 2011, 04:18:29 PM »

Sorry to hijack but the SF Bay Area has several excellent and sophisticated independent shops that you could consider for dealer-level service. Try asking on BARF (lclicky). You could save big by using an independent shop and some DIY.
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nevinfs327
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« Reply #3 on: September 16, 2011, 05:41:18 PM »


I haven't gotten to the 24k yet on my Street Triple R, nor have I self-performed any valve checks.  I didn't realize it was an 8hr job "by the book."  The 12k for me was about $500, all-inclusive by the dealer.  The 6k and 18k were about $170 each.  This is not including brake pads and tires.

When I had my Tiger 1050, the 24k was around $500 at the dealer, IIRC.

The listed hours for a valve adjustment at this review and the related Daytona review show 2.75.

I recall STN member Just_Peekn did a Street Triple valve check at 24k - link.

It wouldn't hurt to post this up on triumphrat.net or tirumph675.net.  

Have you asked what labor rate you are being quoted?  It may be related to the higher quoted costs.


Wow - can't believe I missed that ride report!  I'll have to go back to it on a rainy day.  

Labor rates are $85 or $90, so not significantly different from NYC metro dealers.  

I'm plan to do more research on the DIY once I have some time.  The down side of no rainy weekends this time of year means I play outside too much,  mostly on my pedal bike  Embarassment

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nevinfs327
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« Reply #4 on: September 16, 2011, 05:42:56 PM »


Sorry to hijack but the SF Bay Area has several excellent and sophisticated independent shops that you could consider for dealer-level service. Try asking on BARF (lclicky). You could save big by using an independent shop and some DIY.


Good tip on the local threads.  Definitely a fan of indy mechanics for something like this.  Thanks!

Oh - I should note that the 8 hours is because dealers (at least over the phone) won't do the valve check/adjust independent of the rest of the service.  Total service time I'm being quoted is for everything on the list.  
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« Reply #5 on: September 16, 2011, 08:00:06 PM »

Wow, that's WAY over what I would expect.  What Rincewind quoted (plus maybe $100-200) is what I'd expect.
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« Reply #6 on: September 19, 2011, 10:56:51 AM »

I'm curious if you made any headway on this.  Here is one of the best 675-related valve check threads I've seen - http://www.triumph675.net/forum/showthread.php?t=27207 .  Seems plenty complex to me.  I sure wish this regular maintenance item was more straightforward - like on a V7 cafe.  Wink

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« Reply #7 on: September 19, 2011, 01:06:14 PM »


I'm curious if you made any headway on this.  Here is one of the best 675-related valve check threads I've seen - http://www.triumph675.net/forum/showthread.php?t=27207 .  Seems plenty complex to me.  I sure wish this regular maintenance item was more straightforward - like on a V7 cafe.  Wink



Headway...well, you see, thing is I planned to wrench on the bike yesterday but decided to ride up the PCH with my wife for a nice lunch and twisty loop.  

Thanks for the thread - that is helpful.  I did check the spark plugs early on in my ownership so I've been pretty far into the disassembly procedure.  I learned of an interesting place that has indie mechanics that I'm going to check out this coming weekend: www.bayareamotoshop.com.  Actually, they left a flyer on my seat yesterday while I was having lunch in Point Reyes, so the ride did give me a lead.  

I'm now about 200 miles past the set service so I'll have to ride the V7 until I do figure something out.  Hoping my Haynes manual shows up this week.  

I'll definitely post how I proceed in this thread since there are other Street Triple owners.  

Nevin
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« Reply #8 on: September 19, 2011, 02:14:08 PM »

I find it odd that the dealer will not separate valve checking/adjustment from the rest of the service -- I've done this on a number of occasions, at two separate (albeit midwestern) dealerships, and they didn't bat an eye --
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« Reply #9 on: September 19, 2011, 08:14:17 PM »


Here is one of the best 675-related valve check threads I've seen - http://www.triumph675.net/forum/showthread.php?t=27207 .  Seems plenty complex to me.  



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« Reply #10 on: September 20, 2011, 07:57:31 AM »




I work for beer..... Thumbsup


Thanks, I may attempt this over late winter.  I'll be sure to get a whole case.   Beerchug  
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« Reply #11 on: September 20, 2011, 01:55:47 PM »


I find it odd that the dealer will not separate valve checking/adjustment from the rest of the service -- I've done this on a number of occasions, at two separate (albeit midwestern) dealerships, and they didn't bat an eye --


I had my Superhawk valves adjusted with no other service once, and I had a dealer put the shims in my W650 when I found it needed some adjustment.  The dealers around here are reluctant to take bikes that are partially disassembled, and they don't want to just do valves because the total cost isn't significantly reduced as much of the labor is associated with getting to the valves.  

I suppose it is really a sign of the strength of their businesses since most also can't get me in for a few weeks, so they can be choosy about what they do.

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« Reply #12 on: November 27, 2011, 11:26:46 PM »

Long overdue update - finally on my feet again and able to push the bikes around in my oddly sloping garage after a bicycle crash put me on crutches, then in an awkward walking boot.  

I used the service manual and did most of the 24k service checks yesterday.  Today after knocking a few items off the honey do list I dove into the engine.

It's not hard, exactly, but there is a lot of wiring and a lot of steps.  More so than any other bike I've had, naked or faired.  

Step one was moving the bikes around since the Triumph is in a really tight spot.  Not pictured are the 2007 Harley Heritage something or other and mid-80s Virago that also wedge into here.  Not an ideal work space...

http://i214.photobucket.com/albums/cc195/nevinreilly/Bikes/DSCF1823.jpg

http://i214.photobucket.com/albums/cc195/nevinreilly/Bikes/DSCF1822.jpg

I didn't have a helper and my supply of things to shim was limited, so I siphoned what I could out of my full tank into the Guzzi (which was almost full too) then used a level and ratchet strap to hold the tank up while I disconnected the various lines and plugs.

http://i214.photobucket.com/albums/cc195/nevinreilly/Bikes/DSCF1824.jpg

This is my first fuel injected bike, so more electronics than I've worked with in the past, but pretty easy to disconnect and get to the airbox.

http://i214.photobucket.com/albums/cc195/nevinreilly/Bikes/DSCF1827.jpg

The air filter is pretty filthy (pic didn't turn out, but I'll get another).  I definitely need to replace it.

Next - down to the throttle bodies.

http://i214.photobucket.com/albums/cc195/nevinreilly/Bikes/DSCF1828.jpg

I did this all in the shared driveway between my apartment building and the one behind it, so had to gather up my stuff and move it and the bike several times during the project, which slowed things down.  Looking naked with the tank and air box gone.

http://i214.photobucket.com/albums/cc195/nevinreilly/Bikes/DSCF1829.jpg

http://i214.photobucket.com/albums/cc195/nevinreilly/Bikes/DSCF1830.jpg

Down to the valve cover and I realized I didn't have a rubber mallet here in CA, so I set off walking to the various neighborhood hardware stores to find one.  Took 3 tries.  A half dozen strikes with a 32oz mallet and it popped off problem free, and the gasket came easily with it.

http://i214.photobucket.com/albums/cc195/nevinreilly/Bikes/DSCF1831.jpg

One step I had skipped because it didn't seem important was removing the raised sections on top of the valve cover for the PCV hoses.  Turns out they have to come off because the valve cover slides out the right side of the frame.  Easy enough to resolve.

http://i214.photobucket.com/albums/cc195/nevinreilly/Bikes/DSCF1832.jpg

The manual has you spin the rear wheel in a high gear to get each cylinder to TDC so the valves can be checked.  This is much more difficult than removing and engine side case and rotating the crank with a breaker bar and socket.  No matter what I did I could not get the cams to line up at TDC.  I could get the exhaust side or the intake side right, but that was it.  I settled for this and checked the valves this way, and my first two exhaust valves both let a .330 feeler gauge slide through when the max clearance is .325.  

Doing a search just now I see it is possible to turn the engine with a hex socket so I'm going to give that a try tomorrow and see if I can get TDC to line up.  At least I'll be able to see the engine when I spin it unlike the rear wheel method that has me running back and forth.

If I'm lucky TDC will find the valves within spec, but I'm not expecting that'll be the case.

More to come hopefully tomorrow evening.


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« Reply #13 on: November 28, 2011, 07:23:51 AM »

Thanks for all the details so far, Nevin.   Thumbsup  :popcorn:
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« Reply #14 on: December 07, 2011, 12:33:52 PM »

Bump - did you need to swap any valves then?
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nevinfs327
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« Reply #15 on: December 07, 2011, 01:17:38 PM »

Not much to report, unfortunately.  I double-checked the valves and at TDC and still found them out of spec, but I didn't write down measurements because I'm not confident I got them correctly - you really have to wedge, bend and cram the feeler gauge in there!  I've been entertaining out of town guests, and was out of town myself all weekend, so no additional work done yet.  

I did email and call a few indy mechanics but so far none are willing to do any work unless I deliver it complete and running - same policy as dealers.  Maybe I'll post on the Triumph boards to see if there are any local owners who have done the job before and would be willing to stop by for an afternoon to provide some oversight.  

That said, I did find a good instructional video of the process that fills in a few gaps left by the book: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c4O98zkZ2Zk.

Nevin
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« Reply #16 on: December 18, 2011, 09:20:04 PM »

Finally finished up the service - well, the mechanical components at least.  Electronic I still need to read up on.

Three things made the clearance check possible:

1) Help from a trained mechanic - big thanks to Andrew for swinging by and giving his expert opinion on feel Bigok
2) A pre-curved feeler gauge
3) Using a socket on the crank to rotate the cams instead of the rear wheel as suggested by the manual

Verdict - all valves were within spec.  3 were right at the very limit (2 exhaust and 1 intake) and would have been worth replacing if I did in fact need to remove the cams.  None were decidedly out of spec so the cams stayed put.

From there it was really a reassembly project.  

You will need this gasket - it is the cardboard type that tears when removed

http://i214.photobucket.com/albums/cc195/nevinreilly/Bikes/DSCF1840.jpg

http://i214.photobucket.com/albums/cc195/nevinreilly/Bikes/DSCF1841.jpg

I had removed this little plastic piece in the frame to better access some bolts.  DON'T!  It is a huge pain to get the wiring and cables back in place and it didn't really help access bolts anyhow.  

http://i214.photobucket.com/albums/cc195/nevinreilly/Bikes/DSCF1844.jpg

Replacement air filter - old one was beyond cleaning

http://i214.photobucket.com/albums/cc195/nevinreilly/Bikes/DSCF1842.jpg

Reassembled and ran it for a few minutes to warm up the oil and make sure all the components were correctly connected.

http://i214.photobucket.com/albums/cc195/nevinreilly/Bikes/DSCF1843.jpg

Next up I need to resolve the check engine light which wasn't on before and I'm sure is on now because I disconnected so many electrical connections.

Tucked away until next time.

http://i214.photobucket.com/albums/cc195/nevinreilly/Bikes/DSCF1845.jpg
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