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Topic: New to touring  (Read 4243 times)

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Cablebandit
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« Reply #20 on: January 31, 2012, 09:47:38 AM »

 Lol
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« Reply #21 on: January 31, 2012, 07:40:55 PM »


I am wary of using bungey cords anymore...


I'll repeat what Orson says.  I also now avoid bungee cords and only use straps that can be cinched tight.  If you look at the yellow duffle bag in the photograph (above) you'll see only straps.  I have incoporated a quick-release on my straps, so packing is just as quick as with bungee cords.
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« Reply #22 on: January 31, 2012, 08:19:16 PM »




I'll repeat what Orson says.  I also now avoid bungee cords and only use straps that can be cinched tight.  If you look at the yellow duffle bag in the photograph (above) you'll see only straps.  I have incoporated a quick-release on my straps, so packing is just as quick as with bungee cords.


I occasionally use bungee cords to strap something on the back seat, but I always use one or two more than I really need  Lol. I don't trust them either for regular use.
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« Reply #23 on: January 31, 2012, 10:58:18 PM »


Its been said already. Take a trip and figure out what you did and didn't need. Work it out from there.

Screw what others say. Take what you want and adjust to your own desires.

Secure everything very well and don't forget the toilet paper!


+1 what others say, just don't forget the toilet paper, there is an occasional shortage at STN meets.

« Last Edit: January 31, 2012, 11:09:13 PM by Skee » Logged

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« Reply #24 on: February 01, 2012, 12:06:35 AM »

Consider doing a shakedown trip.
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« Reply #25 on: February 01, 2012, 02:01:17 AM »

whats a shakedown trip?
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I see what you did there.




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« Reply #26 on: February 01, 2012, 02:38:04 AM »


whats a shakedown trip?


Go somewhere.  Just for fun.
Take what you'd take if you were going in your car, ie. duffel with clothes, toothbrush etc.  Attach it with bungees, either cord, strap or net. If you don't have a waterproof duffel bag or backpack (strap it to the bike, don't wear it) be sure to put your stuff in plastic bags inside so you have dry socks.  Some money (and/or a credit card) and your phone (optional but recommended).  A tent or bivy and a sleeping bag if you're sleeping outdoors and know about it ahead of time* and a map if you've never been wherever it is you're going  This is all you need for moto-touring. Everything else is extra.

Every time you pack your bike you will take different stuff, leaving behind stuff you took before because you never used it and taking different stuff because you wished you had it last time.  If you find you want to do more you'll gradually accrete a bunch of gear, a little bit at a time, eventually more than can be loaded on the bike all at once.  The most important things to keep in mind when gear whoring shopping are "can I afford this?" and "how many things does it do and how small does it fold up?"

You'll find the right load out for your needs as you go.  A flat repair kit and some practice with it (about to get new tires? poke a hole in the old one and fix it) is a great place to start.  Thumbsup







*this may not happen every time, DAMHIK  Wink
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« Reply #27 on: February 09, 2012, 09:27:03 AM »

Kinda curious as where you are located and where you plan on traveling to.  

All good advice here.  I personally will always use a tank bag w/map case on top.  Don't use a GPS yet, might in the future if I see a need for it.  I know others that won't leave home without it.  Even if you do use one, I would recommend bringing a good map along as a backup.  

I've used a tank bag along with soft sided saddlebags or a tailbag many times for 3-7 day trips, with no problems.  However, my first trips were on a small bike with a gym bag tied on to a back rack.  That was many many years ago...!  Plastic garbage bags make good bag liners AND can be used for and emergency jacket liner if needed because of rain and/or cold.  Don't overpack, try to take things that can be used for multiple things and pack up very small.  Extra socks and an extra pair of gloves are always a big thing on MY list, as I hate having cold/ wet hands and feet.
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« Reply #28 on: February 09, 2012, 10:03:50 AM »


Don't use a GPS yet, might in the future if I see a need for it.  I know others that won't leave home without it.  Even if you do use one, I would recommend bringing a good map along as a backup.  


This brings up one of my loves of a good paper map: looking ahead. If I have a general direction I want to go, it is very easy for me to look at a map and say "this road will get me there - eventually  Bigsmile  and then I go. I have a much harder time doing anything like that with a GPS. For me, the GPS is for those times when I need the most direct route there, assistance in finding a specific address or (and this is the part I haven't used yet), following a pre-determined route.
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« Reply #29 on: February 09, 2012, 12:50:40 PM »

I can go indefinately with my Cortech rig. A set of sport saddlebags, their duffel tailbag and their mini tank bag. This will handle clothes for three days and my camping (not cooking) gear. I have very little $$ wrapped up in it.

I don't see a need for a better windscreen. Invest in a quality rainsuit.

As for a GPS, skip it. Nothing gets a converstion going with the locals like breaking out a map. Open up a paper map and people feel obligated to share. You will have no lack of info about points of interest, local history and good roads. These are opportunities that you do not want to miss.  
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« Reply #30 on: February 09, 2012, 07:36:20 PM »


I can go indefinately with my Cortech rig. A set of sport saddlebags, their duffel tailbag and their mini tank bag. This will handle clothes for three days and my camping (not cooking) gear. I have very little $$ wrapped up in it.

I don't see a need for a better windscreen. Invest in a quality rainsuit.

As for a GPS, skip it. Nothing gets a converstion going with the locals like breaking out a map. Open up a paper map and people feel obligated to share. You will have no lack of info about points of interest, local history and good roads. These are opportunities that you do not want to miss.  


Absolutely true!  I can't tell you how many times when so done has seen me at a gas station or in a restaurant with a map open, and had one or more people ask me what I'm looking for or where I am going.  Great conversation opener.
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« Reply #31 on: February 09, 2012, 09:04:14 PM »


I can go indefinately with my Cortech rig. A set of sport saddlebags, their duffel tailbag and their mini tank bag. This will handle clothes for three days and my camping (not cooking) gear. I have very little $$ wrapped up in it.

I don't see a need for a better windscreen. Invest in a quality rainsuit.

As for a GPS, skip it. Nothing gets a converstion going with the locals like breaking out a map. Open up a paper map and people feel obligated to share. You will have no lack of info about points of interest, local history and good roads. These are opportunities that you do not want to miss.  


Interestingly enough, I've had people come up to help me when they've seen me puttering with the GPS.   Thumbsup

This does not invalidate your point about the map. Both maps and the GPS are good tools.

BTW, welcome to STN.   Bigok
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« Reply #32 on: February 09, 2012, 10:35:09 PM »

In several ride reports I've read about "the GPS sent me this way or that."

I just can't abide by being led around by the nose. I gotta make my own plans. That's just cuz I'm a Luddite  Bigsmile
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« Reply #33 on: February 10, 2012, 10:58:09 PM »

i will be doing the bulk of my riding between major cities with lots of stop overs. i'll also be going camping, but all the good camping sites are within a few hrs ride of my city. i need the GPS mainly for the roads through the other cities to avoid paying toll and high traffice roads.
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« Reply #34 on: February 11, 2012, 04:43:36 AM »

Many times my GPS is used simply for a compass.
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« Reply #35 on: February 11, 2012, 11:37:40 AM »

One other use of my GPS is the favored "Shortest Route" feature (this is best used with a bike you don't mind taking off road). I've found some amazingly fun roads because of this feature  Thumbsup
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« Reply #36 on: February 11, 2012, 11:46:39 AM »


One other use of my GPS is the favored "Shortest Route" feature (this is best used with a bike you don't mind taking off road). I've found some amazingly fun roads because of this feature  Thumbsup


Me too.    Thumbsup
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« Reply #37 on: February 11, 2012, 10:41:45 PM »

I love my GPS on my scooter even if its just a for town run around

I also love my grip heaters when its below freezing
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« Reply #38 on: February 13, 2012, 01:12:29 PM »


whats a shakedown trip?


Definitely. The first time I had the Concours majorly loaded for a camping trip/East coast tour I had a couple cam-straps holding a duffel on the back of the bike.

A hundred or so miles into the trip we were on the slab and I could feel something was not right with the load. I slowed way down and pulled over,
here I had a couple of the straps placed somewhere dumb and they had loosened up to the point where that duffel was going to let go. Made me all nervous after that,
Big Ben from the forum here tailed me for a while keeping an eye on my cargo making sure everything was riding tight.

After I got the new placement for the straps figured out, all was good, but whatever you do do a test run with your load to make sure everything will
stay where it should be.

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« Reply #39 on: February 13, 2012, 09:33:04 PM »

just so you know...

1) there is no camping in sport-touring

2) there are no passengers in sport-touring

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