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Topic: Lots of Affordable Buells  (Read 21767 times)

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DogBoy
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« Reply #80 on: March 16, 2012, 02:02:54 PM »




I'm a backroad bomber as well -- that's my favorite type of riding.  I don't ride track, nor do I do 135mph wheelies either.  Now that my wife has a vtwin that gets good mileage (mid 40's), I am sort of jonesing for a v-twin.  And my Street TripleR is coming up on an expensive 24k service - by commuting it really ups the miles.  I should probably stop typing before I get any ideas, especially about the Lightning Long, XB12STT, or the Uly.   Embarassment

I wonder if the author of the article sold his STR for a Buell or not.   Headscratch


Email him and ask. He runs CityBike a tabloid motorcycle magazine for Northern California.
http://www.citybike.com/index-2.html
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« Reply #81 on: March 16, 2012, 02:22:40 PM »


In my opinion, being a person who loves sportbikes, there is no better alternative as a do it all bike for commuting, sport riding, touring, and low maintenance than a Buell XB.  A maxi-scooter comes close to the low maintenance commuter part but sorely lacks on everything else.  The low maintenance is a huge factor when you commute.  On top of that is the inexpensive buy in on used XB's with low miles, it's an excellent choice.  

Rince, I know someone who is selling his '06 Lightning XB12Ss (Long) with 19k miles on it for $4k.  He is in SoCal.  He has this bike detailed twice a year and we performed the maintenance and tire changes on it.  I know it's a solid bike and never had any issues with it.  I thought about buying it myself but I would have to sell one of my bikes and that is NOT an option.  Just so you know, the XB12Ss is VERY hard to come by nowadays.  This example is red with red wheels.  It comes with the Pit Bull rear stand, Factory Service Manual, and an extra tall windscreen (in addition to stock height number plate).  The original owner is a mature guy.  Never wheelies, no stoppies, no abuse of any kind.  I can vouch for this guy being anal retentive like me!  


Thanks for the notice on your friend's bike but I'm not ready to buy nor am I certain that I would mesh with a Buell.  I tested a Firebolt 12 (my favorite), CityX, and about three Uly's, so I know about the ride experiences generally.  I want the low-maintenance engine, the belt-drive, and the high-spec suspension.  I don't want the cheap looking instruments, cheap looking plastic finishes, or the small sized fuel tanks.

What sort of miles did you get on your XB12R before the fuel light came on?

This was my favorite one: XB12R in black with orange screen and wheels.   Inlove

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Rogue
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« Reply #82 on: March 16, 2012, 03:56:24 PM »

That color scheme was available in 2005 & '06 I believe.  The '06's got improved transmissions, lighter clutch action, and improved belt that had a service life of 100k miles (given you don't get rocks and other sharp objects caught in it), and slightly bigger fuel tank.

The XB12R's frame was always the shorter one so it got a smaller tank than the longer frame of the Lightning Long and Ully.  I would get 120 miles to reserve at a sport pace.  140 at a steady 80-85.  The L Long would get 160-180 before reserve.  

The only real difference in ride experience is the engine.  It's very similar to a Guzzi, or BMW twin, or the Ducati aircooled twins with only minor variations.  In other words it's nothing like an inline or liquid cooled, multi-valve engine, and you can't ride it like one.  Well, that and the Buell's quick handling.  I remember making the tightest U-turns on my Firebolt thanks to its short wheelbase.  They kind of combine the agility of a 600 with the motor of a Guzzi.  Very similar to an aircooled Monster really.
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Rogue
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« Reply #83 on: March 16, 2012, 04:30:10 PM »

I preferred the XB9 motor to the XB12.  The 12 had a little more power, but the 9 was a little revvier.

I had an 03 XB9S (first year for the S), I put 35k on it.  Gas, oil, and tires was all it needed.
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Kootenanny
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« Reply #84 on: March 16, 2012, 04:37:13 PM »




I'm a backroad bomber as well -- that's my favorite type of riding.  I don't ride track, nor do I do 135mph wheelies either.  Now that my wife has a vtwin that gets good mileage (mid 40's), I am sort of jonesing for a v-twin.  And my Street TripleR is coming up on an expensive 24k service - by commuting it really ups the miles.  I should probably stop typing before I get any ideas, especially about the Lightning Long, XB12STT, or the Uly.   Embarassment

I wonder if the author of the article sold his STR for a Buell or not.   Headscratch

BTW, I really like the Street Triple R--as I've said in a number of posts, after riding it back-to-back with the Speed Triple, I preferred the 675 Street.  And I admit, after a morning of riding Triumph triples, when I got back on my 'Bolt, it felt kinda like getting into an old Ford pickup.  But, on the ride home (5 hours of twisties) the next day, I honestly didn't feel that I'd have been any happier on any of the Triumphs or Ducatis I'd ridden at the demo.  Maybe it's because I'm used to the Buell, or maybe it's just that I have extremely low standards... Wink
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« Reply #85 on: March 16, 2012, 05:49:06 PM »

Koot, you will never let Scott off the hook.  Lol

The feel and characteristic of the motorcycle is just unique to itself.  If you're used to what you have, when you hop on something different it's a neat feeling.  But after a while, get back on your old ride and you may realize the other one was not really "better".  It was just different.

When I would get on my VFR after riding the Firebolt for a week, the VFR felt so incredibly smooth and refined.  I liked it.  But after riding the VFR for a week then I get back on the Firebolt, the 'Bolt shakes and has more low frequency vibes and has a clunkier transmission but I still liked it.  In fact, I liked it even more.  I think it was the torque and the immediate reaction to throttle input, as well as the direct feel of its chassis that I liked the most.  The 1125R is even more different than either bike so none is better than any of those, just different.  It's nice to switch back and forth.  During the time I had all three, to be perfectly honest, every time I got on the Firebolt after a long time of not riding it, I realized why I loved it so much.  The 1125R is actually more direct and feels more like a race bike than the Firebolt.  I like them all very much.  I wish I kept the Firebolt.  
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Kootenanny
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« Reply #86 on: March 16, 2012, 06:39:51 PM »


Koot, you will never let Scott off the hook.  Lol

Learned that from my wife Bigsmile

The feel and characteristic of the motorcycle is just unique to itself.  If you're used to what you have, when you hop on something different it's a neat feeling.  But after a while, get back on your old ride and you may realize the other one was not really "better".  It was just different.

This is exactly it.  I love doing demo rides, but...it is seldom that I get that "I gotta get me one of these!" feeling.  I felt it when I first demo'd a Firebolt--and it persisted through several demos of other (ostensibly "better") bikes, so...

(BTW, so far I've never ridden a Guzzi Wink ).  
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« Reply #87 on: March 16, 2012, 07:29:34 PM »

Koot, have you rebuilt your suspension?  Just wondering.

Last year a great deal on an 1125R fell on my lap and that was the only real reason I sold my Firebolt.  I was looking around for a replacement just because I wanted something different.  I remember questioning my decision every time I rode the Firebolt during the period when it was for sale.  I knew I would regret it and that has now come around.  At the time, I also didn't have the garage space for three bikes.  But now I do and really kicking myself.

I never replaced my fork fluid on the Firebolt.  I felt it was working so well at 30k miles, why bother?  I did replace the front brake rotor and pads.  I wanted to replace the headlights the way Bueller had his done with Hella's.  I also wanted to Ceramic coat the muffler, add some CF bits here and there.  Oh well.  
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« Reply #88 on: March 16, 2012, 10:04:44 PM »

So far, other than setup, all I've done is rebuild the front forks (new bushings, seals, and of course fluid).  New brake pads, of course (Lindal Gold, I think).  I'm thinking about installing Race Tech "Gold Valves" at some point, and perhaps replacing the stock rear shock with a Penske shock...but so far, I've been happy with the handling.

I'm still waiting for a 750-ish version of EBR's 1190... Wink
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« Reply #89 on: March 17, 2012, 06:17:15 PM »

I need to win the Lotto to justify a $40k bike.  $25k is easier to swallow but still....I would rather get a used XB12R.  My buddy just spent $30k on a new bike and I can't imagine paying that much for one.  
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Rogue
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« Reply #90 on: March 20, 2012, 07:44:03 AM »




What sort of miles did you get on your XB12R before the fuel light came on?



With a mapped Micron and higher gearing - custom primary - I'd get 285 highway km on 11.7 litres at the light and 311 km at 13.9 litres (14.5 litre tank).  So that is about 180 miles to the light in US speak.  About 210 km (130 miles) to the light in traffic.

With the race tune and exhaust I have now it is 195 - 245 km (120 - 150 miles) on the highway (depending on altitude and speed) and 150km (90 miles) to the light around town.  But way fun while it uses juice.  If I want range I take the 1125R.
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« Reply #91 on: March 20, 2012, 10:24:47 PM »

Had a great day with Torquemada. Reminded me of why I so enjoy this bike. It's not a 'do it all' motorcycle, but it does its particular thing very well.  Wink

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Kootenanny
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« Reply #92 on: March 21, 2012, 02:17:54 AM »

stromgal, that's a great looking bike--I'd love to own a tuber if I had room in the garage!
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DogBoy
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« Reply #93 on: March 21, 2012, 01:20:57 PM »

Envy. I has it.



Had a great day with Torquemada. Reminded me of why I so enjoy this bike. It's not a 'do it all' motorcycle, but it does its particular thing very well.  Wink


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Rincewind
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« Reply #94 on: March 21, 2012, 02:32:57 PM »

Question to the Buellistas, Buellers, Buellites Buellsters, or whatever you are called.  At what year did the Buells lose their engine braking?  

From one article:

While the upside is that the engine does
make nice smooth throttle transitions, the
strong elastic deceleration that would be
expected with hefty full-circle iron flywheels
is artificially extended well past the
point of desirability. In fact, the rider must
learn to cover the brakes closely in tight
going as the engine’s compression braking
is almost completely eliminated.

Recent experience with traditional
big V-twin engine braking
makes this sensation doubly disappointing,
so that our testers’
reactions ranged from quick
adaptation to inflamed disgust.


This was from a 2006 review (link), and it was something that I noticed especially during my Ulysses test rides.  However, I don't recall this issue from when I tested a Firebolt, which was around 2004 or 2005.  Maybe I just overlooked it then, I'm not sure.  Was there a specific year that this change occurred?

Thanks
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Kootenanny
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« Reply #95 on: March 21, 2012, 03:40:30 PM »

AFAIK, the change would have been in the 2003 model year, when EFI was introduced.  Buell's fuel mapping is set to eliminate drastic engine braking when you chop the throttle; this is a bike with a big-bore V-twin, very short wheelbase, and no slipper clutch.  The mapping may have been changed again in later models, but I find the engine braking nicely modulated on my 03 Firebolt--I can chop the throttle without chirping the rear tire (but throttle blips are required when shifting down in a corner!).  As I've said elsewhere, though, the Firebolt does prefer a smooth, flowing riding style--it's not a "point and shoot" bike--and I can tell you that you do NOT have to "cover the brakes closely in tight going."

What do these same testers have to say about more "modern" sportbikes with OEM sllipper clutches?  Traction control?
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« Reply #96 on: March 24, 2012, 12:44:36 AM »

The Firebolt engine braking is about perfect for me.  Around the same as my Laverda triples and no less than the I4s I've ridden.  

The 1125R is pretty similar - a touch more perhaps - but the EBR tune for an 1125R with stock muffler seems to reduce the engine braking significantly.  

My Torquehammer tune gives a bit more engine braking and I had to get used to it.  It will lockup on a rough change down to first in the wet.

With ECMSpy you can set Fuel cuttoff on Decel to get carby like  heavy V-twin engine braking.

With heavy engine braking I end up compensating with more throttle through a corner anyway.  It is no good if the engine braking slows me too much.  I don't use brakes much anyway - only when I am pushing hard on really tight roads.  For all the rest the engine braking is sufficient - I'd say perfect.

There isn't much difference between the year modes Kootenanny.  On all of them engine braking is sufficuent but not excessive.
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Kootenanny
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« Reply #97 on: March 24, 2012, 02:11:35 AM »


There isn't much difference between the year modes Kootenanny.  On all of them engine braking is sufficuent but not excessive.
So I'd suspect, but I just didn't know.

I'd still like to hear the reviewers' take on bikes with slipper clutches.  Sometimes, I really think these guys are just looking for anything to criticize (on ANY bike review, not just Buells).
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« Reply #98 on: March 25, 2012, 12:48:26 AM »

My 2006 Firebolt had engine braking.  Nothing like my VFR800 though but plenty enough so that when I rolled off the throttle the bike did slow down.  The VFR's reaction to closing the throttle in the low gears was like someone dropped a boat anchor!  To be honest, it took me a couple of rides to get used to not having as much engine braking on the Firebolt.  The result however was that I learned to control my speed in corners better.  Most importantly was, the Firebolt just flicks into turns with almost unlimited ground clearance so if I was going a bit too fast into a turn, just lean more!  

The 1125R has a slipper clutch and it has even less engine braking than the XB12R Firebolt.  At first I needed to adjust but, like the Firebolt before it, it only took me about two rides to acclimate.  I actually prefer the limited engine braking because you can downshift and not upset your line due to excessive engine braking.  I believe this is the whole point of limiting engine braking with a slipper clutch.  

If you ask me, having limited engine braking is a good thing.  Both the Firebolt and 1125R, even with their reduced engine braking, still slow down sufficiently so as to allow you to easily control your speed without constantly riding the brakes like a car would, even going downhill.
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Rogue
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« Reply #99 on: March 25, 2012, 12:51:33 AM »


With heavy engine braking I end up compensating with more throttle through a corner anyway.  It is no good if the engine braking slows me too much.  I don't use brakes much anyway - only when I am pushing hard on really tight roads.  For all the rest the engine braking is sufficient - I'd say perfect.

There isn't much difference between the year modes Kootenanny.  On all of them engine braking is sufficuent but not excessive.


This one.   Thumbsup
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