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Topic: A Black Art  (Read 1282 times)

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« on: March 24, 2012, 07:14:42 PM »

Expanding horizons is Good.
Occasionally, this means reading other than ST.net for a moment.

From OneWheelDrive:
http://www.onewheeldrive.net/2012/03/19/ktm-990-adventure-r-versus-google-navigation/

Quote
To pull this off, I need a pace that is a high rolling average, rather than a flat out haul. A roadside stop talking to the local constabulary would slow things down considerably, so I set the pace to quick but not attention grabbing.


To even speak of the Black Art of the High Rolling Average (HRA) may ruin a long, lucky spell of no "performance awards".
 
But here goes:
1. Keep your stock exhaust. I love the sound of a wailin' Akropovic as much as the next piston-head, but not many LEOs are piston-heads.
2. Ten over, only when safe to do so. Twenty over only when you actually ARE a LEO.  Bigsmile
3. Obey all the rules, all the time, with exception as noted in 2 above.
    Hand signals are best. They show any LEOs that do spot you that you know what you're doing. It suprises and mystifies everybody else, which makes you visible and possibly addled and hence, to be avoided.
4. Instead of drinking diuretics (Red Bull, coffee, tea, or sodas/pop), try chewing ginseng root instead . Washroom breaks eat into the HRA quickly, unpredicatbly and often. As noted in the article above, stops lead to  
    questions, like "What kind of Harley is that?". Never argue with the ignorant; it's a guaranteed time killer.

Have you got #5?
Are ya feelin' lucky, punk??
 Bigsmile
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« Reply #1 on: March 24, 2012, 10:07:25 PM »

Keep hydrated, but not too much.  Long time in the saddle =quicker dehydration.  A camel-back in the tank bag is awesome.
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« Reply #2 on: March 24, 2012, 10:47:21 PM »

Female riding buddys has a debit or credit card on an elastic cord that's lashed, but secured, to the outside of her jacket.  She found the card-sized plastic holder and cord at a fly-fishing place and puts her gas card in it instead of a fishing license.  That way she doesn't have to rummage through a pocket or tank bag to get at the card.  Workd for her on her Iron Butt.  Cool

Pack trail mix or granloa bars and that way you can eat on your own schedule and not that of your minimum-wage server and cook who may or may not be on their A game.   Bigsmile

Often it's easier to minimize your delays when the bike is stopped than increase your speed when the bike is rolling to get a better HRA.
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« Reply #3 on: March 25, 2012, 08:31:47 AM »

So what exactly is considered a high rolling average? If I stay on twisty two lane highways in WV, my GPS usually claims about a 50-55 MPH moving average. Note that I'm usually doing about 65-70 MPH (actual per GPS) on a 55 MPH speed limit and taking the twisties at double the suggested limit (50+ in a marked 25).
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« Reply #4 on: March 25, 2012, 06:23:50 PM »

HRA??

Well, having Electronic Curse Control is a real good thing if you want to keep the rolling average high. Most folks tend to speed up and slow down a lot, having the bike automatically hold the given set speed overrides the issue.


Camel back is nice but tends to get heavy on the shoulders after several hours, but still better than gulping down a bottle every fuel stop. Having a hydration system set up on the bike, (remote/bottle/bag, what have you) you can have a sip now and again is a real time saver. Think if you slam down a bottle of water at a stop, how soon are you going to need to stop and pee? Now compare that to the rider who slowly sips away (evenly not all at once). Yes, it does cut down on sudden restroom stops.

Carrying all food you intend to eat on the road, (jerky, fruit, power bars, granola with M&Ms, ect.) saves the stop and eat at roadside diners or worse yet gas station/quickie mart.

Having audio helps a lot, music is good but audio books really keep your mind awake. When your mind is active your body will tire less.

Having a high average speed is all about not stopping and when you do how to make it quick.
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« Reply #5 on: March 26, 2012, 03:02:07 AM »

I ride in the direction that promises the greatest enjoyment, at whatever pace suits me at any given time, take breaks as often and for as long as it takes to refresh me, and at the end of the day seek great food and beverage and a clean warm bed. Repeat as needed, all else doesn't matter a damn.  
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« Reply #6 on: March 26, 2012, 04:31:40 AM »


I ride in the direction that promises the greatest enjoyment, at whatever pace suits me at any given time, take breaks as often and for as long as it takes to refresh me, and at the end of the day seek great food and beverage and a clean warm bed. Repeat as needed, all else doesn't matter a damn.  


+1  Thumbsup
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« Reply #7 on: March 26, 2012, 03:33:57 PM »


I ride in the direction that promises the greatest enjoyment, at whatever pace suits me at any given time, take breaks as often and for as long as it takes to refresh me, and at the end of the day seek great food and beverage and a clean warm bed. Repeat as needed, all else doesn't matter a damn.  


Yep.
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