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Topic: 1998 ST1100 - actual sport touring inquiry  (Read 1865 times)

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« on: June 09, 2012, 02:13:11 PM »

Looking at a 1998 ST1100 with 64,000 miles (seems low to me), including stock bags and a Givi trunk.  Dealer is at $4K which is a bit high per blue book.  I don't know anything about these bikes, other than I have heard that some prefer them to the replacement 1300.  Any issues with this make and model year?  Thanks.

Reason I am looking is that my wife no longer rides, and would like me to have a bike that could haul both of us around on occasion.  
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« Reply #1 on: June 09, 2012, 03:02:26 PM »

I had a pair of ST1100 before my current ST1300. The ST1100 is in some ways better, notably high speed stability in dirty air, but is a bit under powered by todays standards. For two up duty as long as you're not trying to keep up with the sport crowd, the ST1100 will still hold its own. Luggage capacity is adequate with a top box, the stock saddle sucks IMO, and just about every aspect of the ergos that can be improved upon is well covered in the aftermarket. Great support group of current and former owners.

If the regular maintenance has been done, and attention paid to the rear drive splines at every tire change, 64k is nothing to these bikes. They'll easily go 200k if looked after.

A few things to look for. Check the plastic cover on the tip over wings for scuffs. Any drops will show up here (unless they've been replaced). If they look newer than the rest of the plastic, they probably have been replaced due to a drop. If the dealer doesn't have service records or can't get them from the PO, insist (or dicker and do it yourself) on a valve clearance check. It's not a real difficult procedure and in almost all cases is just an exercise, but it should have been done at least twice at that mileage. At that mileage the rear shock is toast unless it's been replaced or upgraded. The aforementioned rear splines should be checked for wear and while you're at it, the rubber drive cushions should be checked for play. Any indication of rounding in the splines at the edges, or an elongation of the rubber cushion inserts means the proper maintenance procedure was not followed at tire changes. That year has the larger alternator so that's not a concern. If it's the ABS model it's got a much better set of front forks as well. The brakes are very good on the bike but the linked abs system is excellent.

Most common aftermarket upgrades in no order. Wind screen, saddle, bar risers and suspension. The most common suspension upgrade is a Works rear unit and heavier springs and possibly a Gold valve kit in the front. I found with my wife at 115 pounds and a full load of luggage, the stock suspension was right at the edge of acceptable for moderate paced touring. You loose too much ground clearance to really push hard in the corners. HTH
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« Reply #2 on: June 10, 2012, 06:59:12 AM »

Many thanks!   Thumbsup
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« Reply #3 on: June 10, 2012, 02:12:25 PM »

ALSO,


   The 1100's have a steel swingarm. They tend to rust out in wet climates....Or when driven many years on road salt. Get your nose under that back end and get a good look at the underside....



   Any flakey rust or rust thru's can be expensive as the swingarms are getting fewer and farther between.



   Otherwise, gas oil tires and RIDE!
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