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Topic: FJR Shock Spring Replacement  (Read 7352 times)

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sprint_st
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« on: May 24, 2007, 04:21:33 PM »

Anyone replace their stock shock spring with a HyperPro spring?
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« Reply #1 on: May 24, 2007, 05:19:35 PM »

Only got 4K on the stocker and it is doing OK.  Forks are another issue.  Got the HyperPro combi kit which fork and shock springs because I did it on my last back and it worked out well.  I have since found out that the stock does not have the preload adjustment that I thought it did; just rebound adjustment.  You have what equates to a two position "preload", hard and soft which really is choice between two springs.  I have HyperPro calling the wooden shoe boys but I'm sure they will just confirm the above.  The question is do I just wait until the shock gives up the ghost without changing the spring or do I put the spring on and hope that it will prolong the time until it gives up the ghost.

I know the guys on the FJR Forum are big into Wilbers, Ohlins, Penske's, et al, but I think I'm just going to get the HyperPro 40 EM.  I'm not going to pretend I can adjust all that crap like I'm Nicky Hayden's suspension guru  Lol
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« Reply #2 on: May 25, 2007, 11:53:51 AM »


Not a choice of 2 springs but a choice of using the main or unlocking the secondary and using both.

You are absolutely correct, poor choice of words on my part.  I've finally got some info on the HyperPro spring.  Police FJR's coming out of the factory have the HyperPro spring in place of the stock dual sprung shock that a new commercial FJR has.  Ain't that interesting  Headscratch
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Bug R
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« Reply #3 on: May 30, 2007, 08:26:12 AM »

These guys will fix you up.
http://www.traxxion.com/

For shocks both the Penske and Ohlins are sweet.
For forks checkout the AK-20



Chris
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« Reply #4 on: May 30, 2007, 09:02:16 AM »

The stock Yamaha shock is marginal. Mine was showing signs of wear before I hit 15k miles. I'd recommend you get a quality shock and spring at the same time.  

A bunch of us FJR riders installed Wilbers shocks a while back. It was a group buy and the price was attractive for what looked like a quality shock. I have been happy with mine so far, but several people have reported failures of the Wilbers shock so I would recommend you avoid Wilbers and pay a little extra for something else.
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« Reply #5 on: May 30, 2007, 10:20:40 AM »


The stock Yamaha shock is marginal. Mine was showing signs of wear before I hit 15k miles. I'd recommend you get a quality shock and spring at the same time.  

A bunch of us FJR riders installed Wilbers shocks a while back. It was a group buy and the price was attractive for what looked like a quality shock. I have been happy with mine so far, but several people have reported failures of the Wilbers shock so I would recommend you avoid Wilbers and pay a little extra for something else.

There must be a reason police bikes use the HyperPro spring replacement.  Really the spring is the thing both in forks and shocks with the internal just adjusting the rate. If you ever try those rising rate springs you become a believer.  HyperPro makes an excellent shock too, and I haven't heard of the failures that Wilbers have experienced.
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« Reply #6 on: May 30, 2007, 01:28:32 PM »

20k+ miles on my Wilburs and no failures here.

Bottom line -

Most any aftermarket shock/springs you get will be better than stock.
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« Reply #7 on: May 30, 2007, 01:29:47 PM »

I may be wrong but didn't HyperPro used to be Wilbers USA. I heard there was a falling out with the folks in Germany.
The Wilbers\HyperPro designs are either identical or at least very similar.

Dealing with suspension folks in the past (Racetech and Taxxion) they have always recommended straight springs.
The spring + the preload control the static setup supporting the weight and is measure via the sag.
The damping and rebound handle the dynamic changes.
Total shock travel is the last factor because the mechanics only work if you are not bouncing off the stops.

Rising rate springs as the name says will give you different loads depending on the compression and makes it very difficult to set the rebound and compression to give a consistant response.
In my books inconsistant suspension response = lack of confidence in the bike.

Chris
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« Reply #8 on: May 31, 2007, 07:09:40 AM »


I may be wrong but didn't HyperPro used to be Wilbers USA. I heard there was a falling out with the folks in Germany.
The Wilbers\HyperPro designs are either identical or at least very similar.

Dealing with suspension folks in the past (Racetech and Taxxion) they have always recommended straight springs.
The spring + the preload control the static setup supporting the weight and is measure via the sag.
The damping and rebound handle the dynamic changes.
Total shock travel is the last factor because the mechanics only work if you are not bouncing off the stops.

Rising rate springs as the name says will give you different loads depending on the compression and makes it very difficult to set the rebound and compression to give a consistant response.
In my books inconsistant suspension response = lack of confidence in the bike.

I've dealt with Racetech and put their emulators two bikes.  They AIN'T what they are cracked up to be.  As far as rising rate and straight rate, all I've got to say is I used HyperPro and RaceTech straight rates and I'll take HyperPros ever time.  It is also a case old dogs new tricks.  Why are manufacturers going to multirate springs???  HyperPro springs were in a bike that won Daytona, even though the manufacturer owns Showa.   Wilbers and HyperPro may have had a business arrangement but they are NOT the same.  Something to consider on an FJR is that there is no pre-load adjustment.  Bottom line is go ride them.  Last but not least Racetech and Traxxion are race oriented companies.  The street AIN'T the track by a long shot.
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« Reply #9 on: May 31, 2007, 09:48:15 AM »

Chris (Bug R) brings up some real good points in his post.  IMO, tuning a suspension is one of the dark arts, sort of an offshoot of voodoo.  Most of the companies that deal with it like Traxxion and Racetech are race oriented, even though they say they tune for the street.  Be honest, how many of you really know what to do with a fully adjustable shock???  I'll admit to it, I sure don't.  Factor that in with we ride for lots of hours, for several days, in temperatures that vary all over the place, with loads that vary from two up with all your gear to just you.  How many of you that have the Wilbers are cranking the settings multiple times a day?  I think you really need to get to what's practical.

Take a hard look at Racetech's website, unless they have changed it lately, you crank in all kinds of numbers to get the right bits, but experiment with those input numbers, I did, and the only thing that changed the outcome was rider weight which changes the spring rate they recommended.  Then you go to get that spring and if you weight over about 180lbs you only have one choice.  Also, Racetech is a one spring fits all kind of operation.  For example one spring may fit 20 different bikes and you wind up cutting spacers to make them fit.  They make them short because they will fit more bikes.  What that means is they can and will bottom out.  I'm not a HyperPro salesman but I would like to see someone bottom out their fork springs AND the spring is made for one bike.  Try to get some real help from Racetech.   First you have to get past the bimbo who answers the phone.  Nice girl, but only knows what she has picked up around the shop.  When you get to the second line of defense they know a lot, but not about YOUR bike unless it is a GSXR or some hot crotch rocket.  Then after all is said and done, Nicky Hayden blows your doors off riding a Gold Wing when you are on your Traxxion tricked out FJR  Lol

Update: Springs on forks and shock, testing today.  If anyone ever wants to do this, PM and I'll give you my lessons learned.
« Last Edit: June 02, 2007, 08:26:27 AM by sprint_st » Logged

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« Reply #10 on: July 08, 2007, 09:16:04 AM »


A pic of the stock parts and the HyperPro spring installed.  All the junk on the left comes off. The weight savings alone is worth it  Lol  Excellent ride.
« Last Edit: July 08, 2007, 09:17:44 AM by sprint_st » Logged

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« Reply #11 on: July 30, 2007, 03:39:58 AM »

So you guys are doing track days on the FJR?

I mean I love my FJR to death but I can't imagine buying a 600 lb bike just to canyon carve. I am not trying to be smart here, but can you really justify cost vs improvment on the suspension of an FJR?

What gains exactly are you seeing?

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« Reply #12 on: July 30, 2007, 10:24:00 AM »


So you guys are doing track days on the FJR?

I mean I love my FJR to death but I can't imagine buying a 600 lb bike just to canyon carve. I am not trying to be smart here, but can you really justify cost vs improvment on the suspension of an FJR?

What gains exactly are you seeing?

I think you missed the point.  This spring cost about $100 usd.  There are reports of the stock shock dying in under 10K.  I did this to extend the time before I have to spend $800+ on a new shock.  IMO, because of the nature of this type of spring, it is as close to self adjusting to load as you can get.  Now, for canyon carving.  You sell the FJR short.  Granted it isn't a superhyper motard or even a GSXR, BUT, that's a real big BUT, it can move through turns a lot better than some give it credit for.
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« Reply #13 on: August 04, 2007, 09:20:47 AM »

Traxxion was written up for their work on Gold Wing suspension. They listen, and are not just race bikes.
Wilbersusa is now Hyperpro dealer (and YSS, part of dispute).
Wilbers was founded by break off group from Hyperpro, originally much the same, shocks are quite different now.
Hyperpro springs are very good, and adjusted to sweet spot, work well over good range. Straight rates are more flexible in range if you know what you're doing or have patience to learn.
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« Reply #14 on: August 04, 2007, 04:02:45 PM »



I think you missed the point.  This spring cost about $100 usd.  There are reports of the stock shock dying in under 10K.  I did this to extend the time before I have to spend $800+ on a new shock.  IMO, because of the nature of this type of spring, it is as close to self adjusting to load as you can get.  Now, for canyon carving.  You sell the FJR short.  Granted it isn't a superhyper motard or even a GSXR, BUT, that's a real big BUT, it can move through turns a lot better than some give it credit for.


Hey Sprint:

Oh, the FJR is no slouch, but the reason I commented here was that even I can grind the pegs on the FJR. In all honesty it's all the bike I would ever need. It is much more capable than I in stock form.

I was just curious is all.
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« Reply #15 on: August 05, 2007, 08:51:31 PM »


Hey Sprint:

Oh, the FJR is no slouch, but the reason I commented here was that even I can grind the pegs on the FJR. In all honesty it's all the bike I would ever need. It is much more capable than I in stock form.

I was just curious is all.

I got a humility lesson this morning by a very good rider on an R1100GS who passed me on a very knarly hunk of road.  Even with top of the line Ohlins or whatever's set up by Traxxion or whoever, the outcome of that event would have been exactly the same.  I did not run out of hardware performance, I ran out of rider performance, probably more like I was getting way closer to leaving my comfort level.  I'm sure my old Sprint would have been a much better tool, but in reality I'm not sure if even that would have changed anything, maybe a Sprint and me at age 27 would have done it  Lol I think you know what I'm saying, in that I could have kept my Sprint because it was a great bike; but the FJR is the bike for me at this stage of my riding life.
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« Reply #16 on: August 05, 2007, 10:17:29 PM »

Riders willingness to push the envelope is a given.
OEMs have to guess best spring rates for their bike.
Using Hyperpro's srings  preloaded to suit you or dialed in straight weights make for a far more controled ride because they allow the suspension you do have to function as well as it can.
Proper damping adds more but effectiveness per $ favors proper springs.
People will pay hundreds to cushion their feet walking or jogging, stock springs too often are like walking on hard soles.
Proper suspension like Birkenstocks.
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