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The Open Road => General Sport-Touring Discussion => Topic started by: Mrs. DantesDame on March 30, 2008, 11:10:06 pm



Title: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs. DantesDame on March 30, 2008, 11:10:06 pm
Ok, here it goes: STN's attempt at a singular place to post up women-rider specific questions, suggestions and information. I respectfully request that the menfolk keep out unless they have an insightful and useful comment to make. Lurk all you like, but no snide remarks, please!

And just so you know, I am reserving the right to snip and prune and delete posts (in this thread only) as I see fit!!!! So any rude or crude comments won't be tolerated. I'd really like to see this as a place where women riders can share information on gear, bikes and riding that may otherwise be difficult to answer in a more general thread.

Thanks for everyone's cooperation  :bigok:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Stargzrgrl on March 31, 2008, 10:10:00 am
I'll start with some links!  :bigok:

http://www.womenridersnow.com

http://www.womenandmotorcycling.com/womenc/index.asp

http://www.womenssportbikerally.com

http://womensridingschool.tripod.com


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: LicketySplat on March 31, 2008, 12:09:54 pm
http://www.femmoto.com/


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Orson on March 31, 2008, 12:10:54 pm
just my 2 cents...

the first posts will get lost in a long, long thread.

Why not threate...errr request the management to start a new section for wimins, just like we have the Apparel & Gear Section?

The management can even make it so that only wimins posts can be viewed, so that toddrod's posts will be left on the cutting room floor. ;)

 :couch:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: katego on April 01, 2008, 07:55:20 pm
I don't think that you need to duck for suggesting that Orson. I think it is a good idea.  :inlove:

-k


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: LicketySplat on April 04, 2008, 08:14:38 am
http://www.womenandmotorcycling.com/womenc/index.asp

AMA Women & Motorcycling Conference is on for '09. Date and location only, no details yet.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Busy Little Whiner on April 05, 2008, 11:24:49 pm
Testosterone is the chemical of desire... whether sexual or winning competition events...

Anyone who has any doubts about the strength and fitness of women need to only to talk to Patty
Wagstaf... she pilots a 1808 pound 350HP aerobatic aircraft at World Aerobatic Championship levels
pulling 10 positive and 8 negative Gs going 200MPH near the ground... she not only competes directly
against men in USA National Aerobatic Champion and World Aerobatic Championships but has won...

Her achievements against both men and women... her secret is testosterone...

1993 International Aerobatic Club Champion

1991, 1992, 1993 US National Aerobatic Champion

1990 1992 1994 Top USA Medal Winner, World Aerobatic
Championships

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wx_ui2qWgqI

 (http://www.ultimatedisney.com/images/a-c/ahs14.jpg)


(http://www.ctie.monash.edu.au/hargrave/images/wagstaff_wagstaff_350.jpg)


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: BarbRN on April 08, 2008, 08:37:38 pm
I have been much more fortunate finding women's sized gear in the last two years.  The industry is finally figuring out we have bucks to spend and more women are riding.  


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs. DantesDame on April 08, 2008, 09:03:04 pm
Welcome Barb!  :bigok:


I'm really fortunate that I can wear most men's gear without too much trouble, and if not, then there's a shop just a few miles from me that has a wide selection of woman-specific gear (Seattle Cycle Center (http://www.seattlecycle.com/))


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: BarbRN on April 08, 2008, 09:15:55 pm
I'm very small, 5'2" so I really have to shop specifically.  Even some women's things are too long.  


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: LicketySplat on April 08, 2008, 10:43:41 pm
Eek Barb, I'm 5'3" and I can't put either foot on the ground when I sit on my DH's FZ1!! That is one tall and heavy bike!


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: stefrrr on April 08, 2008, 11:28:18 pm

I have been much more fortunate finding women's sized gear in the last two years.  The industry is finally figuring out we have bucks to spend and more women are riding.  

It's so much better, even in the last year! I tried on the retina-burn yellow Olympia, and it fit so much better than I expected! I'm curvy, so men's gear has never fit me right. I feel so much better wearing gear that's not baggy in all the wrong places.  :thumbsup: My first jacket (about 5 years ago) was basically a different sized man's jacket with no other adjustment to make it a "woman's" jacket.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: BarbRN on April 09, 2008, 07:10:04 am

Eek Barb, I'm 5'3" and I can't put either foot on the ground when I sit on my DH's FZ1!! That is one tall and heavy bike!


I have lowered it with dogbones.  It's very light compared to my last bike.  I had one that was 700 pounds but it was a cruiser.  No more cruisers for me.  I like the speed.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: dbduchene on April 12, 2008, 09:53:04 pm

Eek Barb, I'm 5'3" and I can't put either foot on the ground when I sit on my DH's FZ1!! That is one tall and heavy bike!

Here is a little help with the reaching the ground problem
http://www.helimot.com/shopexd.asp?id=73
These where made for real woman riders and give a 1 and 1/4 inch lift.
Denis


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: stefrrr on April 14, 2008, 11:00:38 am
Are you saying that I'm not a real woman rider?  :(  

 :p


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: dbduchene on April 14, 2008, 03:50:56 pm

Are you saying that I'm not a real woman rider?  :(  

 :p

Nope I was trying to say that they are made for woman that really do ride and not like those Icon things with the 3 inch heel and is like a inch wide so that they can try and look good on the back of something
Denis


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: stefrrr on April 15, 2008, 09:46:16 am
I was just being silly. Blame it on inadequate reading comprehension (and lack of clinking the link.)  :o


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: November on April 16, 2008, 10:30:20 am
I'm glad that there are more women's options but I have found that the sizing is usually way off.

I am a plus size woman and even though I find some women's gear in my size (18) it does not fit. I tried on a size 18 jacket once and couldn't zip it over my chest. That was a nice kick to the stomach.  :o


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Busy Little Whiner on April 16, 2008, 02:15:12 pm

Are you saying that I'm not a real woman rider?  :(  

 :p


No one is officially a real women rider until they make it to WCRM 5...


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: LicketySplat on April 16, 2008, 08:08:28 pm
International Female Ride Day, first Friday in May (May 2 this year)

http://www.motoress.com/femalerideday2008.asp


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: stefrrr on April 17, 2008, 10:19:04 am

I'm glad that there are more women's options but I have found that the sizing is usually way off.

I am a plus size woman and even though I find some women's gear in my size (18) it does not fit. I tried on a size 18 jacket once and couldn't zip it over my chest. That was a nice kick to the stomach.  :o

Have you tried Tourmaster stuff? Also, the Olympia jacket is sized large.  :thumbsup:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: BarbRN on April 18, 2008, 06:21:42 pm

International Female Ride Day, first Friday in May (May 2 this year)

http://www.motoress.com/femalerideday2008.asp


Cool, never heard of this until now.  I will definitely try to ride to work that day.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs.BMW-K on April 20, 2008, 11:49:15 pm
I just picked up a First Gear Jacket, and I'm happy to say it actually fits... the sleeves are the right length, and the elbow armor actually fits on my elbows!  At 5'4", it's been a challenge to find sleeves that don't reach past my finger tips.  It's the TPG, and I'm pretty happy with it.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: katego on April 21, 2008, 01:07:30 am
I am on my 2nd first gear jacket. It actually does fit. It also fits to zip on to my men's-size first gear pants, though those will be too big when it is time to take the winter liner out.

-k


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs.BMW-K on April 21, 2008, 11:55:11 pm
Okay Ladies... I have a question for you.  Do you find that you ride worse on the day or so before your period, and on the first day or two of your period?  I didn't make the connection at first... just thought I was having a really bad day, but then it happened a couple more times, and each time it was on those days for me.  Anyone else have the same experience?  


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Stargzrgrl on April 22, 2008, 12:17:59 am

Okay Ladies... I have a question for you.  Do you find that you ride worse on the day or so before your period, and on the first day or two of your period?  I didn't make the connection at first... just thought I was having a really bad day, but then it happened a couple more times, and each time it was on those days for me.  Anyone else have the same experience?  


Oh, I'm an emotional wreck the day before my period.  I shouldn't be anywhere near anyone unless they want to have their heads ripped off.  :crazy:  If I'm on the bike the day before my period I find riding exhausting and can not focus.  So, I tend to know it's time to park it.  

I try not to ride the first day of my period as it's really uncomfortable for me if not distracting.  I have to make more bathroom breaks and dealing with that kind of takes away the joy I get about being on the road as I'm thinking more about what's going on down below than the ride.  

And if I'm crampy all bets are off, I'm staying in being a hermit.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: bluepoof on April 22, 2008, 01:15:53 am
OK, since someone else mentioned periods...I decided to try a Diva cup instead of lugging around a metric ton of tampons this summer.  Anyone use one?  Anything I should watch out for?  :headscratch:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs. DantesDame on April 22, 2008, 01:18:00 am
This ought to keep the boys out!  :lol:


Trina - I've never noticed any difference when riding for different times of the month, but then again, I rarely notice those times anyway (yes, I know how lucky I am)

And Carolyn - I don't even know what you're talking about!  :crazy:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Stargzrgrl on April 22, 2008, 01:26:40 am
Ok, I googled Diva Cup:

http://www.divacup.com/


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Stargzrgrl on April 22, 2008, 01:33:57 am
Well, I think I'm sold.  

From their website:

Quote
Will The DivaCup™ work for an active lifestyle?
   
Yes! It's fantastic for swimmers, outdoor enthusiasts, aerobic classes, cycling, travelers, campers, and so on. You will feel fresh, secure, and liberated. No feminine hygiene products to pack (or run out of). No worries about staying close to a bathroom. No restrictions on physical activity. And since you can wear The DivaCup™ longer than tampons or pads you have the convenience of not having to think about your period all day long!


Now all I need is to find a remedy for the sometimes blinding cramps I get that won't put me to sleep.  :crazy:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Stargzrgrl on April 22, 2008, 01:35:00 am

Are all the women on this forum in, ahem, synchronicity?


Egads!  I hope not otherwise STN may implode!  :lol:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: LicketySplat on April 22, 2008, 07:36:43 am
I'm at the age when I'm moving beyond this stuff...

but 1. yeah, not every month, but definitely my cycles have affected my ability to ride. That can happen directly (hormonal influence on emotions) or indirectly (worse allergies or lack of sleep making me fuzzy).

and 2. yes, I use(d) a Diva cup and would recommend it. There's a little bit of a learning curve, so I wouldn't recommend getting one right before a long trip. Also, if you have heavy periods and expect to have to empty the thing in public restrooms, evaluate your own level of squeamishness, and be aware that it's much easier with a little preparation before you go into the stall.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs.BMW-K on April 23, 2008, 11:35:22 am
Ladies... I love you guys!  If this doesn't scare the guys off... nothing will  :lol:

Yosh...  my sister... thanks for the affirmation...  the lack of focus, the discomfort, the bathroom breaks... ugh!

Poof... Diva Cup??  You'll have to tell me how it works for you.  Do you have to order those, or can you get them at the local pharmacy?  I'm completely fascinated by the concept.

Dante... ah yes... I remember the days of care free periods...  the good old days!  It was a breeze until about 4 years ago... not anymore!  But, I guess I should just be glad I still have them.

Lickety... I do have heavy periods, but I'm not squeamish... just what sort of prep are we talking... a mop and bucket???


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: bluepoof on April 23, 2008, 11:56:41 am

Poof... Diva Cup??  You'll have to tell me how it works for you.  Do you have to order those, or can you get them at the local pharmacy?  I'm completely fascinated by the concept.


I got mine at Whole Foods, in the cosmetics/bath stuff/lotions section.  They also have unbleached tampons, cloth pads, etc.

(TMI BELOW)

I'm actually giving it a shot right now, so I could test it out in my cycle before the long bike trip.  It's great so far!  WAY more comfortable than tampons, even just on my 14-mile-each-way commute.  

You only need to change it twice a day and, since it doesn't absorb anything or chafe, you can put it in ahead of time so you don't get that "is that it? what about now? ack!" thought 15 times a day on the first day. :lol:

I think it's going to work out great for long distance riding.  It would even work for backcountry camping -- no used materials to pack back out! Though you would need bottled/potable water to rinse the cup out.

I stumbled upon this LiveJournal community (http://community.livejournal.com/menstrual_cups/) when I was researching it, and it's really helpful.   :thumbsup:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: VIVID1 on April 23, 2008, 12:43:17 pm

I just picked up a First Gear Jacket, and I'm happy to say it actually fits... the sleeves are the right length, and the elbow armor actually fits on my elbows!  At 5'4", it's been a challenge to find sleeves that don't reach past my finger tips.  It's the TPG, and I'm pretty happy with it.


I just bought and I'm returning the pants for that jacket.  I don’t understand why so many ladies pants are so tight at the bottom, who wants tapered pants for motorcycle riding, they should make them all boot cut if the pants are intended to be worn on the outside of the boot  :shrug: I can barely zip these over my boots, and they are too short and the butt area is too large. It’s like the proportions are all messed up.

These pants are great is you have a large rear end area but have an inseam of 28” or less and have super skinny boots and ankles. The quality of the pants are OK.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: VIVID1 on April 23, 2008, 01:00:22 pm


Now all I need is to find a remedy for the sometimes blinding cramps I get that won't put me to sleep.  :crazy:


As for the cramps Aleve is the best, take 2 pills, not only does it alleviate the cramps for up to 12 hours but you’ll bleed less…. way less. But you have to take it as soon as you think you're getting your period.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: ReynoldsFH439 on April 23, 2008, 01:15:40 pm



You only need to change it twice a day and, since it doesn't absorb anything or chafe, you can put it in ahead of time so you don't get that "is that it? what about now? ack!" thought 15 times a day on the first day. :lol:



I got "The Keeper", another brand of menstrual cup that's also available at Whole Foods, in June or July of last year.  It definitely takes some getting used to, but I haven't had any leakage problems since I figured it out.  I can't speak for riding with it since I don't ride (I've been tacking on "yet" to that statement with more certainty recently, though) and I haven't ridden pillion with it yet either, but it seems to hold up to other activities.

In the TMI category:

+1 on the putting it in ahead of time, and it's also nice for the end when it's light enough to feel like a waste of a tampon but still going to require extra effort on laundry by going without. Personally, tampons always seemed to suck me dry at that point making removal a little like ripping off a bandaid :crazy: ...not an issue with The Keeper.




Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: photomd on April 23, 2008, 01:31:13 pm

Now all I need is to find a remedy for the sometimes blinding cramps I get that won't put me to sleep.  :crazy:


I knew I shouldn't have clicked on this...stupid males. :bash:

Anyway, here's a suggestion about the cramps. They're thought to be caused by prostaglandins. You can decrease the prostaglandins with anti-inflamatory doses of NSAID's: ibuprofen. This is 600-800mg taken three to four times daily, and it must be taken every day for several days. If you buy the 200mg generic tabs, start with 3 at each meal when you feel your cycle coming on. It won't be the "magic bullet" like an antibiotic for a UTI, but it should take the edge off (said like a true male  ;)  ). You can dose up to 800mg 3 times a day at the next cycle if the above doesn't work. Don't go above 800mg four times daily...it's hard on the kidneys. I hope this helps. And I'm very glad I'm male, especially after treating women who suffer with bad cycles.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: stefrrr on April 24, 2008, 01:14:05 am

Now all I need is to find a remedy for the sometimes blinding cramps I get that won't put me to sleep.  :crazy:


I'm with Vivid - Aleve (naproxen sodium) is an NSAID that helps with the cramps and the pain. Plus, it doesn't cause as much damage to the stomach lining as ibuprofen. I've known one or two people who said it made them sleepy, but I don't think it's a "normal" side effect.

Me, I'm pretty out of it. I get cramps, extremely anemic, distracted, the works. I can't and don't ride for two or three days usually. I missed some good riding right in the middle of my ten-day trip last summer.  :(

Eating a high-fiber, low-fat diet seems to be the best solution. It's also the hardest.  :crazy:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs.BMW-K on April 24, 2008, 12:52:22 pm
I really try to stay away from the carbs, and stick to high protein/high fiber - the carbs just make the fatigue worse for me.  I can still manage to ride, but let's just say it's a good idea for me to stick to nice straight roads, and not attempt anything twisty, unless I'm at golf cart speeds.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: LicketySplat on April 24, 2008, 02:27:51 pm

Lickety... I do have heavy periods, but I'm not squeamish... just what sort of prep are we talking... a mop and bucket???


 :lol:

Wash hands, get a couple of paper towels wet (bring your own since not all public restrooms have paper towels) - one to wipe off the cup (so it's not too dry), one for yourself. That's all  :thumbsup:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Jeff N on April 27, 2008, 01:44:45 am
I'm just gonna post the link and get the hell outta here.

http://www.roadracingworld.com/news/article/?article=32182


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Tyrroneous on April 28, 2008, 08:32:14 pm
This is Mrs. Tyrroneous using my husband's screen name-- in need of some womanly advice!?!  I have long hair that I usually pull into a low ponytail.  My problem is that whenever I put on or take off my helmet, it tugs on my hair.  It's quite painful and I would prefer not to lose anymore hair than I have to.  :eek: Does anyone have any suggestions?  I've heard of skull caps, but wasn't sure if that was a good solution.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs. DantesDame on April 28, 2008, 08:39:57 pm
Mrs T ( :D)

I had the same problem. My solution probably won't work for you, but I just cut my hair off :shrug:  It feels great and doesn't look half bad, either  :cool:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs.BMW-K on April 28, 2008, 11:58:12 pm
I use a really thin neck gator (sp?) that I picked up at a sporting goods store (Chicks??).  It was in the ski section.  I pull it over my head as if I was going to pull it on my neck, but I leave it covering my head, and then slide my helmet on.  It keeps all those hairs from being pulled out, and had the added benefit of keeping those little hairs from tickling my nose inside the helmet.  It also keeps me from getting wind burn on my neck, or abrasion from the helmet strap.

It's not the most attractive thing in the world, but then, helmet hair isn't exactly glamorous!


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: stefrrr on April 29, 2008, 11:49:30 am
Buy a Buff. (http://www.buyabuff.com/) Use it the same way Mrs.BMW-K uses her gaiter.

I put it around my neck, flip my head upside down, pull the buff out straight (sort of like a chef's had), kind of pile it on top of my head, and put the helmet on.

It's really lightweight, and my head feels cooler and my hair looks better than without. It helped as well before I got all my hair cut off. I learned the trick from Jobu's girlfriend, and she has really long curly hair. I think it works better for curly hair than my straight hair, but it makes even my hair look better. It also keeps those little straggler hairs from flying in front of your eyes while you're riding.  :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

I try to put it on really quick and take it off with the helmet, because it's REALLY dorky when it's going on.  :lol:

I should add that Buy a Buff is a small company - they were really helpful when I placed my order.  :thumbsup:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: lionlady on April 29, 2008, 03:08:53 pm

This is Mrs. Tyrroneous using my husband's screen name-- in need of some womanly advice!?!  I have long hair that I usually pull into a low ponytail.  My problem is that whenever I put on or take off my helmet, it tugs on my hair.  It's quite painful and I would prefer not to lose anymore hair than I have to.  :eek: Does anyone have any suggestions?  I've heard of skull caps, but wasn't sure if that was a good solution.


Try a buff. They come in way cool colors and you can use it as a scrunchie off the bike. www.buffusa.com (they've got a cool video demonstration to click on). I have like 10 different buff thingies. They are easier to wash than my helmet liner and do a great job of concealing helmet hair.

P


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs. DantesDame on April 29, 2008, 03:29:35 pm
I used to have a Buff but then I gave it to Bluepoof. Oddly enough, I miss it now  :(


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: bluepoof on April 29, 2008, 04:57:17 pm

I used to have a Buff but then I gave it to Bluepoof.


I don't think you did.  I bought my own Buff with my REI dividend.   :headscratch:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Stargzrgrl on April 29, 2008, 09:45:46 pm
I recently picked up a few Buffs for myself and the Super Munchkin™ They definitely fit better as a helmet liner than my old method of using a bandanna which didn't always keep all of my hair tucked in.  

When it's colder I like my balaclava.  Just have to get used to the weird looks you will get when you stop and take your helmet off.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: stefrrr on April 30, 2008, 01:06:32 am
I bought a pretty, fluffy blue buff for colder weather. I haven't used it once. I just know it's going to be useful one day!  :o


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jsanford on May 03, 2008, 05:01:19 pm

International Female Ride Day, first Friday in May (May 2 this year)

http://www.motoress.com/femalerideday2008.asp


w00t!  I rode both to work and around on both bikes yesterday...guess I celebrated!


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jsanford on May 03, 2008, 05:04:51 pm

OK, since someone else mentioned periods...I decided to try a Diva cup instead of lugging around a metric ton of tampons this summer.  Anyone use one?  Anything I should watch out for?  :headscratch:


I've used one for years, it used to be called something else (The Keeper I think) and made of rubber instead of silicone. First heard about it when I was racing bicycles.

They're great, but start to leak when they get full, but once you get used to using it that's easy to prevent. Much better than Tampax, though.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jsanford on May 03, 2008, 05:08:33 pm



As for the cramps Aleve is the best, take 2 pills, not only does it alleviate the cramps for up to 12 hours but you’ll bleed less…. way less. But you have to take it as soon as you think you're getting your period.


+1 on that; VIVID1's description is right on.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jsanford on May 03, 2008, 05:12:29 pm

This is Mrs. Tyrroneous using my husband's screen name-- in need of some womanly advice!?!  I have long hair that I usually pull into a low ponytail.  My problem is that whenever I put on or take off my helmet, it tugs on my hair.  It's quite painful and I would prefer not to lose anymore hair than I have to.  :eek: Does anyone have any suggestions?  I've heard of skull caps, but wasn't sure if that was a good solution.


Not a skull cap--balaclava. Besides keeping the neck warm, it keeps the hair away from the helmet.

I'm at that awful in-between stage lengthwise right now--too long to be completely covered by the balaclava and under the jacket collar, not long enough to braid effectively.  I rip out knots at the office and, annoyingly, see too much hair during headchecks.  But it's not thick enough for a hair-band.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jsanford on May 03, 2008, 05:16:57 pm
Now my question:

For those of you who commute to work regularly by motorcycle--how is that received? I read on CycleAngels about a woman in TX who was asked by her employer to stop doing it, her racing leathers were deemed inappropriate, even to/from the elevator at each end of the day. I've been hypersensitive about my own office since I sprained my ankle biffing the bike last Friday, missing work icing it, and EVERYONE knows.

Not that I'd ever stop (motorcycle parking is free, cars start at $10/day) but I wonder how it's affecting my long-range career prospects at my fairly conservative company.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: stefrrr on May 03, 2008, 06:44:39 pm
That's one I sometimes wonder about for my future. My most recent job was pretty casual, so no problem there. My current job is working with my SO, so sometimes I even run deposits and such on the motorcycle. But someday I'll finish law school (someday...) and have a real job. I dunno. :headscratch:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Veda on May 04, 2008, 11:31:56 am

For those of you who commute to work regularly by motorcycle--how is that received?


I commute to work most days and don't have any problems.  I wear overpants and a motorcycle jacket over my business clothes and take them on and off at my cube.  Sometimes I do feel a bit self conscious walking into the office in full gear.  Some of my co-workers tease me but in a good natured way.  If it became a problem I could take them off in the parking lot and store them in my hard luggage.  

You know, no matter what you do with your life there is always going to be something that some conservative jerk is going to take issue with.  If it's not motorcycle riding maybe it is the fact that you don't wear skirts, or that you're a single mom, or you smoke, etc.  To be honest I think motorcycling may have an advantage as it sets you apart from the other girls and makes you more approachable.  I don't think a day goes by at work that someone doesn't ask me: "how's the bike?"  "did you ride today?"  "great day for a ride,"  etc.  You now have a hobby that everyone is going to know about and it gives them an easy conversation starter.  Just last week I had a VP at my company who I had never spoken to before stop to ask me about my bike.  He is also a rider and gave me kudos for my dedication to ride to work - he said he was not a fan of riding in the cold weather we've been having.  Had it not been for the bike we never would have had a conversation.


Title: Cramps/PMS
Post by: fungirl on May 04, 2008, 12:35:06 pm
I admit I use to take Ibuprofen and all it's alternatives before I found out how damaging they are to your liver.  My liver was in bad enough shape with all the drinking I did long ago, so decided to find out why we get cramps and all of those other miserable symptoms!  

One quick answer:  nutritional deficiency.  Sure enough, supplementing my diet with some vitamins and minerals whisked those cramps away.  The most important ones are

B-6. Vitamin B6 is critical to maintaining hormonal balance.  In most situations, the therapeutic dosage of 50 to 100 mg per day is generally regarded as safe, even for long-term use.

Magnesium which is considered the "antistress" mineral. It is a natural tranquilizer, as it functions to relax skeletal muscles as well as the smooth muscles of blood vessels and the gastrointestinal tract.  As magnesium plays such an integral part in normal cell function, magnesium deficiency may account for the wide range of symptoms attributed to PMS.  The recommended range of magnesium is 300 to 450 mg daily.

Calcium supplementation has produced significant improvements in PMS symptoms in double-blind studies.  It has been found that women with PMS have reduced bone mineral density. The recommended dosage for calcium in PMS is 1,000 to 1,500 mg daily.

(If you take high amounts of calcium daily, you may have a magnesium deficiency. Most experts suggest that your calcium: magnesium ration should be 2:1. In other words, if you take 1500 mg of calcium daily through diet and supplementation, you should try to consume at least 750 mg of magnesium daily as well. this may help prevent an imbalance from occurring. Magnesium and calcium supplements should be taken at different times to allow for better absorption of each of these minerals.)

Zinc levels have been shown to be lower in women who have PMS. Zinc is required for proper action of many body hormones, including sex hormones, as well as in the control of the secretion of hormones. The suggested range for zinc supplementation is 15 to 20 mg.

There are also some important dietary factors you should take into consideration as well.
Reduce or eliminate the amount of animal products in the diet, and increase consumption of fiber-rich plant foods, including fruits, vegetables, grains, and legumes).

Considerable evidence suggests that caffeine consumption is strongly related to the presence and severity of PMS. Therefore, caffeine must also be avoided by women with PMS. The effect of caffeine is particularly significant in the psychological symptoms associated with PMS, such as anxiety, irritability, insomnia, and depression. If breast tenderness and fibrocystic breast disease are the major symptoms as caffeine has an adverse effect on the way estrogen stimulates breast tissue.

There is also evidence phytoestrogens may exert a balancing effect when estrogen levels are high as is commonly seen in the premenstrual syndrome (PMS). The consumption of soy foods is the most economical, and possibly the most beneficial, way to increase the intake of phytoestrogens. Vitamin B6 also has an affect on the metabolism of estrogen. Vitamin B 6 is high in yams, leafy green vegetables and legumes.

Excessive salt consumption, coupled with diminished dietary potassium, greatly stresses the kidneys' ability to maintain proper fluid volume. As a result some people are "salt-sensitive," in that high salt intake causes high blood pressure or, in other cases, water retention. In general, it is a good idea to avoid salt if you have PMS. If you tend to notice more water retention during the latter part of your menstrual cycle, reducing your salt intake is an absolute must.

Now, I'm off to order that Diva Cup!!  Yee Ha!!!


Title: Re: Cramps/PMS
Post by: stefrrr on May 04, 2008, 12:42:18 pm

Magnesium which is considered the "antistress" mineral. It is a natural tranquilizer, as it functions to relax skeletal muscles as well as the smooth muscles of blood vessels and the gastrointestinal tract.  As magnesium plays such an integral part in normal cell function, magnesium deficiency may account for the wide range of symptoms attributed to PMS.  The recommended range of magnesium is 300 to 450 mg daily.


Oh, I forgot about magnesium! I take that (when I remember), and it's beneficial ANY time of the month!  :thumbsup:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: November on May 04, 2008, 10:27:11 pm
I ride to work on occassion and haven't had any problems. I work with mostly men and they all are cool about it. A couple of them are Harley riders so I don't think they "get" all my gear and choice of bike, but to each their own.

I think I make more of an issue of it then anyone else (at least in my head). I feel a bit self-conscious walking in with all my gear on and try to get out of it asap in my office. Going to buy a topbox soon and de-gear in the parking lot once I have it.



Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Southern Belle on May 04, 2008, 10:48:00 pm
Thanks for the idea about the Buffs y'all.  Looks like another item needs to be added to my shopping list!   :lol:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: LicketySplat on May 05, 2008, 06:58:12 am
- re: soy foods to balance estrogen - everyone's different, but personally, my PMS symptoms mostly had to do with estrogen being high in balance with progesterone, and a lot of soy foods would make it worse. So try it (foods not pills or refined soy protein) but be aware that it could backfire.

- re: riding to work - back in the day I used to ride to administrative hearings out of town and it was okay. It was definitely less formal than actual court appearances, and as a "regular" I had established relationships with the judges, but I still had to look professional. Pack a skirt, jacket and shoes; wear your riding gear over blouse and pantyhose. Be prepared to do your hair, and makeup if you wear makeup, when you arrive. The judges were intrigued or amused more than anything. I inspired one of them to get a scooter  :D


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Veda on May 05, 2008, 07:25:50 am
Mmm, I thought when soy broke down in the body it basically mimic'd estrogen?  Sorry, I know next to nothing about biology - just going off what I've read on some weight lifting forums.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Southern Belle on May 05, 2008, 09:32:57 am
My husband (Tyronneous) and I are planning on having more children to add to our happy home  :lol: and I was wondering what you ladies thought about riding pregnant.  We have tickets to Indy for the MotoGP races in September and it's his dream that we ride from Mississippi to Indy on two wheels.    

I am just not too sure what we should do with our family planning-- my youngest is 2 1/2 and I don't want to wait too much longer to get pregnant.  Plus I also just got a new SV650 and am not quite ready to let it sit in the garage for the next 9 months!  :o  Any thoughts on this?


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: bluepoof on May 05, 2008, 02:39:25 pm

My husband (Tyronneous) and I are planning on having more children to add to our happy home  :lol: and I was wondering what you ladies thought about riding pregnant.  We have tickets to Indy for the MotoGP races in September and it's his dream that we ride from Mississippi to Indy on two wheels.    


I don't have any direct experience with pregnancy (yet :lol: ) but it's always been my plan to "do what feels right".  I know women who've stopped riding as soon as they discovered they were pregnant, and I know women who've ridden up until their bellies were too big for their gear.

I figure I'll wait until it happens and then just do whatever feels comfortable (same with playing hockey, though I imagine that I'll stop playing hockey before I stop riding).  If it's your dream to ride to Indy and you aren't sick or sore, hey, go for it!


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: katego on May 05, 2008, 03:20:09 pm

Now my question:

For those of you who commute to work regularly by motorcycle--how is that received?


My boss teases that I am not allowed to pursue this "dangerous" hobby. Other than that it is not a problem. When I rode the 650 regularly my luggage was big enough to hold all of my gear.  I would undress downstairs and no one knew. With the 800 all my gear comes upstairs with me - not an issue where I work. Sometimes leads to interesting conversations with folks that I might not normally talk with.

Sorry to hear about your injury. Seems like those things always happen at the most embarrassing moment possible. Get well soon.

-k


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: stromgal on May 05, 2008, 04:27:24 pm
I rode to my birthing classes. :D  Continued to ride until it got too uncomfortable, which happened earlier with son #2 than son #1.

I've never had a problem commuting to work, but I've always worked places where it didn't matter, like a motorcycle shop.

bj


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: bluepoof on May 05, 2008, 05:06:33 pm
OK, my turn with a question.  Any advice for shaving as little as possible during a six-week trip?? I should have tried Nair or waxing months ago to see if I had an allergic reaction or anything, but as it stands, I leave in less than 2 weeks.  Am I doomed to shaving whenever I can find a friend's house or hotel room?  :(


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: stromgal on May 05, 2008, 05:23:10 pm
Not sure I'm understanding the question. Even if you're camping, there will be showers, so can you explain the problem?


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs. DantesDame on May 05, 2008, 05:33:28 pm
hee - do what I do and just don't shave  :o  Other than pits I just leave my (thankfully light-colored) hair wherever it ends up on my legs. Seriously Carolyn, who's going to see your legs on this trip anyway?  :shrug:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: bluepoof on May 05, 2008, 06:48:51 pm

Not sure I'm understanding the question. Even if you're camping, there will be showers, so can you explain the problem?


I don't want to have to deal with shaving, but I hate being hairy. I, um, sweat a lot and when I get hairy, it gets sticky and stinky and sweaty and...well, you get the idea.   :(

I guess I just don't want to have to bring a razor and blades and have it take up room in my toiletries bag.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: katego on May 05, 2008, 06:59:38 pm

hee - do what I do and just don't shave  :o  Other than pits I just leave my (thankfully light-colored hair) wherever it ends up on my legs. Seriously Carolyn, who's going to see your legs on this trip anyway?  :shrug:


+1

Shaving is overrated.  :eek:

-k


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Sea Dog on May 05, 2008, 08:53:54 pm


I guess I just don't want to have to bring a razor and blades and have it take up room in my toiletries bag.



For traveling, I buy the cheapo disposable razors and toss them as I go.  I usually get the men's razors because for some reason women's cost way more just becuse they are pink or have a fancy handle  :headscratch:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Stargzrgrl on May 05, 2008, 09:20:55 pm



For traveling, I buy the cheapo disposable razors and toss them as I go.  I usually get the men's razors because for some reason women's cost way more just becuse they are pink or have a fancy handle  :headscratch:


+1

I usually don't bother with bringing any razors on a trip.  If I find that I absolutely can't handle going another day without shaving I'll go out and buy pack of disposables and use whatever soap is available.

To help keep the stinky factor down I tend to apply liberally (Bluepoof, you've seen me use this stuff, so you know how crazy I can get with it  :lol: ) Gold Bond's Ultimate Comfort™ powder:

(http://a1468.g.akamai.net/f/1468/580/1d/pics.Drugstore.com/prodimg/139173/300.jpg)

This stuff ROCKS!  


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: November on May 05, 2008, 10:40:59 pm

hee - do what I do and just don't shave  :o  Other than pits I just leave my (thankfully light-colored) hair wherever it ends up on my legs. Seriously Carolyn, who's going to see your legs on this trip anyway?  :shrug:


+1

I just wouldn't shave.  :p


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: VIVID1 on May 06, 2008, 12:25:11 pm
I can get away with one shave per week during cold months.  Two per week in warmer months if I'm planning on wearing shorts. I bring one disposable razor on the trip, it would last me up to 2-3 months.



Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs.BMW-K on May 06, 2008, 02:23:53 pm
On long trips I also use the disposable razors... and if you don't have a shower available, but must shave, try using body lotion - helps the razor glide... (even though I usually dry shave the pits, on camping trips)

As for any other shaveable parts... I wouldn't bother unless the hubby were along.   :lol:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: bluepoof on May 06, 2008, 02:54:32 pm

As for any other shaveable parts... I wouldn't bother unless the hubby were along.   :lol:


That's the part I'm fretting about!  I swear, I must be the only yeti on this site.  :(


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: HipGnosis on May 06, 2008, 02:57:43 pm
On long trips I also use the disposable razors... and if you don't have a shower available, but must shave, try using body lotion - helps the razor glide...

Conditioner (for hair) make a nice, economical replacement for shaving cream and water - though some do leave a 'film' on the skin if you can't wash it off.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs. DantesDame on May 06, 2008, 03:23:26 pm


That's the part I'm fretting about!  I swear, I must be the only yeti on this site.  :(


Wax it, baby!!! :banana:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: shygrl on May 06, 2008, 11:41:46 pm
Hey ya'll I've been lurking around here for a little but now I have a question for the gals on this board --

What riding boots or shoes do you find to be the best fit and most comfortable to wear on your bikes? :headscratch:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: stefrrr on May 07, 2008, 09:34:09 am
I have C-width feet, so I went with men's Alpinestars Ridge boots, because they run narrow. (men's narrow = women's wide) I added a thin gel insole in one boot to make it fit perfectly.

I've learned that coolmax socks are a must.

One weird thing I've noticed though, my legs itch for a while (sometimes the next few days) after wearing the boots for a while. I'm not sure if it's lack of ventilation or what.  :headscratch:
I'm going to try BMW's summer boots next year.  :thumbsup:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: NinjaNoob on May 07, 2008, 12:23:40 pm
Welcome, shygrl :)

For boots - I actually opted for more dirtish ones from Sidi that came in kids' sizing . . . I'm 5"0 tall, so not only am I a chick, I'm basically a midget :P (not meant to offend anyone, it's just the truth . . .).

For finding what works for you - this is my experience - I went to all the motorcycle shops around me in like a 70 mi radius (good think RockinJC likes to ride heh) - tried on different boots (everything I tried on did not fit, but it was more of a "how does this manufacturer size their stuffs, etc" than anything) - chatted with everyone I could think of who rode - and posted my question here :)

For the Sidi's I picked up - I did sacrifice some comfort, but picked up a lot as far as protection goes . . . I used to be in grad school for Physiology, so I'm a bit of a nut when it comes to protection of my feet/ankle area/ATGATT . . .

Hmm, I don't believe I actually answered your question though :P
1. "best fit" - All I can say is Alpinestars seem to run smaller than listed, Sidi was the opposite (about a whole size different, 34 felt like a 35 and vise versa), umm, TourMasters were wide? (I think that was the brand).
2. Most comfortable to wear - Err, depends on what your riding position is? - dirt bikes - more straight, sport bikes have different ergos than cruisers, etc - what you want to do with them (ie street primarily, dirt, enduros, etc).

-Oh, and whatever boots I was trying on, I hopped on one of their bikes (most stores had a smallish sportbike I could sit on) to see how they felt shifting/back breaking and such as well.

Hope this helps, Good luck with your search :)


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: VIVID1 on May 07, 2008, 12:46:07 pm
Some of us that are short wear the Frey Daytona Lady Star GTX boots. They add an additional 1.5" to my height and are really comfortable and well made boots, although they are pricey.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: stromgal on May 07, 2008, 02:00:21 pm
I'll echo the comment that you really need to go to dealerships and try stuff on. Every foot is different, every boot is different. I've got men's Oxtar (now called TCX) Explorers for summer, SetUp Gran Prix's for the rest of the year. And they're different sizes, because the footbeds are cut differently!

If you lack stores nearby, New Enough has a good return policy. I had to return my Gran Prix's for a different size.

bj


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: shygrl on May 07, 2008, 10:49:50 pm
Problem I have is high arches, I have a heck of time with slip-on type boots. are there any women's boots that have internal laces and Velcro flap. I currently have a pair of the Vega Metro sport boot but tough to get into.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: stefrrr on May 07, 2008, 10:54:28 pm
I have the same problem, plus a high instep. AND I've sprained both of my ankles, so there are limits to what I can do to get boots on. The Ridge boots work really well for me. For support for your arch, you can see if you can fit an additional arch support cushion in the boot.  :thumbsup:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: pcrdude on May 09, 2008, 01:30:29 pm



Wax it, baby!!! :banana:


I just happened across this hilarious post about that on another forum:

Waxing

(BTW, I glance at this thread occassionally because one of my riding buddies is a woman.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Southern Belle on May 09, 2008, 06:03:14 pm
Oh my goodness, that story was painfully hilarious!   :lol:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: lionlady on May 12, 2008, 09:42:15 am



I've used one for years, it used to be called something else (The Keeper I think) and made of rubber instead of silicone. First heard about it when I was racing bicycles.

They're great, but start to leak when they get full, but once you get used to using it that's easy to prevent. Much better than Tampax, though.


Actually, the Keeper is a different brand, and still out there. Just got a Diva cup. LOVE IT!!! So much easier to deal with and the best part (since I'm getting to be that age where I get "false/mini" periods) no leaks, and no being sucked dry by a tampon in the case of a mini period.

P


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: lionlady on May 12, 2008, 09:44:17 am

Now my question:

For those of you who commute to work regularly by motorcycle--how is that received? I read on CycleAngels about a woman in TX who was asked by her employer to stop doing it, her racing leathers were deemed inappropriate, even to/from the elevator at each end of the day. I've been hypersensitive about my own office since I sprained my ankle biffing the bike last Friday, missing work icing it, and EVERYONE knows.

Not that I'd ever stop (motorcycle parking is free, cars start at $10/day) but I wonder how it's affecting my long-range career prospects at my fairly conservative company.


One great thing about working for an environmentally ACTIVE company is that all I have to do is mention the 45mpg fuel economy my bike gets, and I don't think there will be any "issues."

P


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: lionlady on May 12, 2008, 09:47:02 am

I have the same problem, plus a high instep. AND I've sprained both of my ankles, so there are limits to what I can do to get boots on. The Ridge boots work really well for me. For support for your arch, you can see if you can fit an additional arch support cushion in the boot.  :thumbsup:


Try Oxtar Jupiters. Very comfy with good support. And consider some spendy insoles (pull out what is in the boots and replace them). I've got high arches and have always just expected to add good insoles to whatever footwear that I'll spend serious time in.

P


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: shygrl on May 12, 2008, 08:06:46 pm
Thanks ladies for your imput on riding boots. I came across a website showing Alpinestar boots. They have a pair called the Recons that I find interesting. I might give them a try.   :D   And by the way -- Happy belated Mothers Day to everyone!!


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Kath on May 22, 2008, 02:09:31 pm
Hi ladies!  I was wondering if there was a women's forum...I guess this is it ;)  Just wanted to say hello.  I'm mostly a lurker right now since my bike trips have been on haitus for a bit while I raise my baby.  As soon as I'm ready to leave him with someone for a whole weekend, I'll get back out there for some longer trips again.  I'm enjoying looking at the pictures in the Ride Stories section though!

Oh and to the lady who asked about riding pregnant.  I rode until 20 weeks.  I got too clumsy after that and thought I'd better stop LOL  

Hi Pam!! :)



Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs. DantesDame on May 22, 2008, 03:01:14 pm

Hi ladies!  I was wondering if there was a women's forum...I guess this is it ;)  Just wanted to say hello.  



Welcome Kath!  :bigok:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: lionlady on May 22, 2008, 09:20:54 pm

Hi ladies!  I was wondering if there was a women's forum...I guess this is it ;)  Just wanted to say hello.  I'm mostly a lurker right now since my bike trips have been on haitus for a bit while I raise my baby.  As soon as I'm ready to leave him with someone for a whole weekend, I'll get back out there for some longer trips again.  I'm enjoying looking at the pictures in the Ride Stories section though!

Oh and to the lady who asked about riding pregnant.  I rode until 20 weeks.  I got too clumsy after that and thought I'd better stop LOL  

Hi Pam!! :)

{kath}



Hi KATH!!!  :burnout:

P


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jsanford on May 23, 2008, 12:08:20 am
I have fine, thin, breakable hair--have to use little-girl ponytail bands--that has recently become long enough to whip into the faceshield during head checks.

So much for my romantic vision of riding down the road with my hair flowing behind me.

Right now I sort of twist it into a wad and try to pull my balclava around it.  I don't think I have enough for the "hair leather" products out there.


Title: FEMMOTO?
Post by: stefrrr on May 24, 2008, 10:58:33 pm
I'm sorry if there's another thread about this somewhere.

Who's going, where are you staying, will there be an STN meet & greet? :bigok:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Weaselette on May 25, 2008, 07:48:23 pm
Greets, all. Just a quick "hello" to introduce myself. I registered a couple of years ago, but dropped off the radar, and my husband (Portchelanman) lurks regularly.

So here I am, back again, with a spankin' new Aprilia SL750 Shiver to enjoy :inlove: and a new body to outfit with gear.  I've gained and lost the same 30 pounds several times over, and now find myself with a load of size 14 gear to get rid of. I'm looking for a summer-weight jacket and pants -- any favourites?

Re: hair breakage: I always ride with a buff pulled over my head like a balaclava 'neath my helmet. It keeps the stray hairs from driving me mad and helps somewhat with helmet hair.

I also commute on my motorcycle (soon as the snow melts in North Central Washington) and my board of director's just fine with it. I usually take professional clothes along, but have even worked in my leathers when I'm taking off for meetings.

I look forward to getting to know y'all.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: stefrrr on May 25, 2008, 10:43:56 pm
I covet your bike.

Welcome!


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Weaselette on May 26, 2008, 07:12:12 pm

I covet your bike.

Welcome!


*G* Well isn't that nice. I'd let you take it for a spin if we were closer. It's pretty great so far, 'long as I don't crack up playing with the tri-map  :p


Title: Re: FEMMOTO?
Post by: lionlady on May 26, 2008, 08:17:03 pm

I'm sorry if there's another thread about this somewhere.

Who's going, where are you staying, will there be an STN meet & greet? :bigok:


Wrong coast. Grrr.

P


Title: Re: FEMMOTO?
Post by: stefrrr on May 27, 2008, 02:14:39 pm
Yeah, I'm definitely going to fly for this one. I've got so much going on around that time, that I'll have to.

Last I checked flights to Vegas aren't that much.  :thumbsup:

Does anyone know if they rent leathers?


Title: Re: FEMMOTO?
Post by: Krismark on May 28, 2008, 10:30:29 pm

Yeah, I'm definitely going to fly for this one. I've got so much going on around that time, that I'll have to.

Last I checked flights to Vegas aren't that much.  :thumbsup:

Does anyone know if they rent leathers?


Barring anything terrible and unforseen Stargzrgrl and I will both be at Femmoto. They have rented leathers in years past but I don't know for sure for this year. You do not have to wear leather though. Zip together leather or textile is fine too as long as it isn't mesh.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs. DantesDame on June 03, 2008, 02:38:07 pm
I just got a request from this company, www.she-rides.com (http://www.she-rides.com/), to carry Nikwax. It looks like a pretty comprehensive site for women's gear and I thought I'd pass it along  :thumbsup:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Kath on June 03, 2008, 02:50:29 pm
I've seen that one before and bought my Original Buff from them a couple years ago.  Wow...they've expanded! :)


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: uvakat on June 13, 2008, 09:37:44 am
Wow I go on a hiatus from STN and there is a women's section...

In reference to the jobs post... I'm pretty sure riding has not hurt me and probably has helped me a little bit. I work in an engineering firm and a good portion of the engineers/staff ride. My boss just finished his MSF course and now wants me to help him find a VStrom used.

I did have a question for the girls though. I have thicker ankles and calves, is there any boot that you found that fit well? Most street boots generally don't fit around the upper part of my calves. Currently I wear the hideous looking Sidi Vertigos race boots since they have the adjustable ankle/calf, but I find myself wearing hiking boots on commutes since they are more comfortable and I don't look like I'm off of some sci fi set.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: katego on June 13, 2008, 10:50:15 am
I bought the Oxtar (now TCX) Sunray boot when I started riding 4 years ago when my calves were considerably larger. They zip, but have a strech panel and the zippers are on the inside.

I am looking for a replacement though. Does aerostich sell the combat lite boot in women's sizes?

-k


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Fourstring on June 13, 2008, 10:59:44 am

Wow I go on a hiatus from STN and there is a women's section...


I did have a question for the girls though. I have thicker ankles and calves, is there any boot that you found that fit well? Most street boots generally don't fit around the upper part of my calves.


Tourmaster Solution boot.  I bought a set for my wife and she loves them.  


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs. DantesDame on June 13, 2008, 11:14:13 am


I am looking for a replacement though. Does aerostich sell the combat lite boot in women's sizes?

-k


I don't recall seeing women's sizes listed, but go by the European size (US 9 = EU 41, for example). I ordered based off of this and it was pretty close. I don't know if they run a tad large or if I need a 40.5  :)


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jadziadax8 on June 13, 2008, 11:38:40 am

Tourmaster Solution boot.  I bought a set for my wife and she loves them.  


I do love them, and yes they fit my calves just fine.  I have big meaty calves from a) being of nearly 100% German descent, and b) being a softball catcher.  For a, when Terry Pratchett talks about women who can carry a pig under each arm in his Discworld novels, I picture all the women in my family.  :D  For b, I haven't caught in a decade, but still can't seem to lose the muscle.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: katego on June 13, 2008, 06:48:24 pm



I don't recall seeing women's sizes listed, but go by the European size (US 9 = EU 41, for example). I ordered based off of this and it was pretty close. I don't know if they run a tad large or if I need a 40.5  :)


I wear a 39, 40 if I want thicker socks. I didn't see anything smaller than 41 on their site when I looked last week. I'll check again!

-k


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: ctbandit on June 30, 2008, 10:54:32 am

OK, since someone else mentioned periods...I decided to try a Diva cup instead of lugging around a metric ton of tampons this summer.  Anyone use one?  Anything I should watch out for?  :headscratch:


Alright a bit weird but...

My g/f SWEARS by this. She's so thrilled with it she's turned into a semi-diva cup evangelist. Her sister turned her onto it and now she goes around telling all her friend to use it. If she posted on this site and saw someone talking about it she'd freak.. so I figured I take the initiative and post about it for her.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: katego on July 02, 2008, 10:48:26 am



I wear a 39, 40 if I want thicker socks. I didn't see anything smaller than 41 on their site when I looked last week. I'll check again!

-k


I decided to order the TCX/Oxtar Infinity, they have a size 40, and no zipper!

Like I said earlier, I have been wearing the Oxtar/TCX Sunray boots for a few years & they work well for larger calves. The strech panel works well. Waterproof (important in Seattle). Warranty service is also superb, I had a three-year old trashed pair with a broken right zipper that the distributor (Helmet House) replaced, no questions asked.

The instep is removable, width seems normal, and they look fine with work attire. I have a new-in-box pair in size 8 (EU 40) that I want to sell (bought a new pair since I didn't think that HH would replace the old ones). Send me a PM if you are interested!

-k


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Woodsatyr on July 04, 2008, 03:16:12 pm
Hi!  I thought I'd toss this one out for y'all...  http://www.hairglove.com/Action07.html.  I have long hair that I wrap with a hair glove.  It keeps it from getting tangled which doesn't take much with fine hair.

Hi Barb!  :wave:



Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: luvtoride on July 08, 2008, 11:12:39 am



Tourmaster Solution boot.  I bought a set for my wife and she loves them.  


The Tourmaster Solution boot is not good for us chickies w/ large calves. Been there, done that one.... sent the bitches back to whence they came. I am presently wearing the Oxtar Matrix boot. It still does not fit my calves properly. I cannot zipper the boots all the way up. Luckily, there is velcro to close the top of the boots.

I've managed with them thus far... but will be buying something else when I buy new. I'll probably be looking into "Cruiserworks" boots http://www.cruiserworks.com/products.cfm. They have a couple of pairs that aren't horribly cruiser-ish w/ the buckles & such. I hear that they are extremely waterproof, last forever & large calves need apply. Also, a bit expensive... but, not over-the-top expensive.

Good luck. Please, if you find a good boot f/ calves that is worthy of touring, let me know, I don't know whether it is that I have large ankles or large calves... but I've had a real problem with finding riding boots that are not for the pencil legged.
Heidi


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: LicketySplat on July 08, 2008, 08:44:03 pm
I have a pair of BMW Traveler Light boots and a pair of Gaerne Stradas. I don't think you can get the Gaernes in smaller sizes in the US any more. Both pairs have zippers, but they fit my aerobics-instructor calves just fine. ;) Both have hard plastic protection for the shins and malleoli. The current equivalent model of the BMWs is now called their Allround boot.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jadziadax8 on July 09, 2008, 10:39:08 am

The Tourmaster Solution boot is not good for us chickies w/ large calves. Been there, done that one.... sent the bitches back to whence they came. I am presently wearing the Oxtar Matrix boot. It still does not fit my calves properly. I cannot zipper the boots all the way up. Luckily, there is velcro to close the top of the boots.

I've managed with them thus far... but will be buying something else when I buy new. I'll probably be looking into "Cruiserworks" boots http://www.cruiserworks.com/products.cfm. They have a couple of pairs that aren't horribly cruiser-ish w/ the buckles & such. I hear that they are extremely waterproof, last forever & large calves need apply. Also, a bit expensive... but, not over-the-top expensive.

Good luck. Please, if you find a good boot f/ calves that is worthy of touring, let me know, I don't know whether it is that I have large ankles or large calves... but I've had a real problem with finding riding boots that are not for the pencil legged.
Heidi


That sucks that you couldn't get them to work for you.  I'm the wife mentioned above, and do love them (see earlier post in this vein).  They were a little snug at first but stretched out nicely.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: luvtoride on July 09, 2008, 05:05:03 pm

I have a pair of BMW Traveler Light boots and a pair of Gaerne Stradas. I don't think you can get the Gaernes in smaller sizes in the US any more. Both pairs have zippers, but they fit my aerobics-instructor calves just fine. ;) Both have hard plastic protection for the shins and malleoli. The current equivalent model of the BMWs is now called their Allround boot.


LS, I may need to visit my friendly neighborhood BMW dealer to try those boots that you speak of.

I wouldn't be looking for a small size. I'm 5'-8" & about 185-190 lbs. I wear a woman's size 11 or a men's 9. I'm not a small woman. My calves aren't actually fat... they are just really thick. Same w/ the ankles.

Most times I buy men's gear. I have better luck with it fitting for the most part. I figured that men's boots would fit w/o any issue. Yeah well, that absolutely did not happen.

Jad, when I got those Tourmaster boots in the mail & tried them on, I was extremely disappointed. They were a decent boot at a reasonable price. There was no concievable way they would zip up.

I have a Cycle Gear right down the road from me. It seems that all of the boots that they carry are narrow in the calf area. Leads me to believe that a lot of cycle riders are pencil-legged? Ok, I sure they aren't... but the selection of boots makes me think that.

Heidi


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: luvtoride on July 09, 2008, 05:13:24 pm
I have a comment about the ladies section in this forum. Am I to understand that only 1 topic is allowed in this section? Why is that?

I love the idea of a woman's section but don't particularly like to fish through all pages.

I have read most of these pages & it seems that there could've been separate sections for:

Menstruation & you: how do you ride the cotton saddle? or Gear 101 for us chicks


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jadziadax8 on July 09, 2008, 06:08:09 pm

I have a comment about the ladies section in this forum. Am I to understand that only 1 topic is allowed in this section? Why is that?

I love the idea of a woman's section but don't particularly like to fish through all pages.

I have read most of these pages & it seems that there could've been separate sections for:

Menstruation & you: how do you ride the cotton saddle? or Gear 101 for us chicks


It started out a couple of months ago as a test to see if having a women's section was worthwhile.  I think the only topic that couldn't have made it into the Gear and Apparel section is the menstruation topic.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: bluepoof on July 09, 2008, 07:14:01 pm

Menstruation & you: how do you ride the cotton saddle?


Actually, the only menstruation topic was on the Diva Cup -- no cotton necessary. ;)




Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jsanford on July 09, 2008, 09:37:15 pm
Fine, I have another problem.

I do go on long rides alone, and one rule I have is to be reasonably confident that my motorcycle will be reliable. Unfortunately, I have reason to doubt my BMW--it's affected by the antenna ring recall. In short: without warning the bike could refuse to start, and there's nothing that can be done about it.

It's one of 70,000 bikes in the US in the campaign, so my local dealership says that a) they don't have the parts to repair the antenna ring yet and b) it's not clear when they get them how bikes will be retrofitted. My plan is to check twice a week and book an appointment as soon as the kits are in.

However, on the 23rd I'm scheduled to go to a multiday riding trip with camping. Even though my BMW has never exhibited any signs of a flaky antenna ring with my key, I'm really hesistant about taking it on this trip. I've considered trying to coordinate with someone else locally planning on attending the event and riding with them--but to what end? Say we stop somewhere remote en-route to snap a picture and then my bike doesn't start. About the only additional option I can see, having company, is riding two-up somewhere safer to wait for AAA or BMW towing than by the side of the road.  This would mean leaving the BMW and my gear abandoned where it stays.

Luckily for me, I have my Monster, but after two days straight riding it I don't think it's the bike to take on this trip. The footpeg position is just too cramped on my calves for multiple consecutive full days of riding, and I don't have luggage for this bike.

As I see it, I have four options:

a - Chance it with the BMW
b - Chance it with the BMW, and ride with another person advising them of the risk as described above (they have to be comfortable riding two-up)
c - Take the Ducati and a bottle of Aleve
d - Stay home

What would you do?


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: stromgal on July 09, 2008, 10:11:26 pm
e)  Buy a Strom.

I keed, I keed! :D  

I guess 'b' if you're really concerned. Do you have a towing contract? Will you be out in the boonies or on main roads?

I ride alone long distances as well, so I quite understand your concern. Fortunately for me, the Strom's been a rock for 69,000 miles. Hope you manage the trip and have a great time.

bj


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: bluepoof on July 09, 2008, 10:30:29 pm
I'd vote e) sign up for a towing service ahead of time and then chance it with your BMW.

That way you can go on a bike you know and love, but you know there's help if you need it.

I personally use MTS towing (mtstowing.com -- turn off your sound because the website has annoying music) but I know AAA also has a motorcycle towing add-on.




Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs. DantesDame on July 09, 2008, 10:36:20 pm

I'd vote e) sign up for a towing service ahead of time and then chance it with your BMW.

That way you can go on a bike you know and love, but you know there's help if you need it.



I have BMW MOA towing, but that only does good if you're near a phone or have a signal. I'd vote for "e" with some modification: I'd probably take off on my own, on my BMW, but stick to not-quite-so-remote roads, "just in case" I needed to make a call.

Good luck!  :thumbsup:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: luvtoride on July 10, 2008, 11:32:15 am
It seems that there is time to still get the bike in for the recall b4 your trip. Why don't you  get the recall done? It'd make for no more worries where the bike is concerned. Have a good time. Hoping to camp off the bike, myself this coming weekend.

Also, concerning a tow plan... I think that a tow plan is a great idea. Been meaning to get one, myself. I once had to use a friend's tow insurance when my bike cut off in the middle of the road.

No questions asked by the tow company, either.

Edited to add: Ooh, I saw your dilemma about the dealer. Sorry, much apologies... I didn't read well enough. I guess with your situation, I'd hope for repair beforehand... but I'd still take the BMW w/ a tow plan.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jsanford on July 11, 2008, 01:29:57 am

It seems that there is time to still get the bike in for the recall b4 your trip. Why don't you  get the recall done?


Ride West and South Sound don't have the kits, and don't know when they'll get them--I'd consider a run to Oregon, but my inquiry on the BMW subforum hasn't garnered any responses.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: cultureslayer on July 11, 2008, 08:59:52 am
How'd I miss this?

The diva cup is great, just plan on using pantyliners the first month or two while you are figuring out how to put it in correctly.  I tend to have a little leakage the first few days, but my cramps are bad enough to need percocet so that's not normal at all.  They make a special wash for it but I  just use whatever soap there is around.  

I saw soy mentioned.  If you are on thyroid replacement (synthroid, armour) avoid soy.  It makes me feel like crap because it binds thyroid hormone.  For normal people the thyroid just releases more hormone to compensate, but I don't have that option.  :lol:  Armour also works so much better than synthroid.  I started with armour and when my doc tried to get me to take a t4 only pill after a week I asked the pharmacy if the pills had been recalled because the t4 wasn't doing crap for me.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: katego on July 11, 2008, 09:41:08 am



Ride West and South Sound don't have the kits, and don't know when they'll get them--I'd consider a run to Oregon, but my inquiry on the BMW subforum hasn't garnered any responses.


Can you just carry a spare antenna ring?

-k


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jsanford on July 14, 2008, 01:11:16 pm
Re: My trip -- I was able to order the kit from Max BMW in NH. They have tons in stock, so I'm not depriving anyone local there.

New question - anyone else find that women's professional wear these days is the cheapest, most impractical crap out there?

I commute to work, and wear overpants over professional slacks. This means that I wrap the pantleg around my calf before putting on my boots so it doesn't wrinkle.

Over the past two years I've had this job, I've learned that the pantleg hemline stitching inevitably becomes unravelled after a few wearings. I usually fix them myself. However, I just bought two pairs of $60 tencil slacks and both of the pantleg cuffs completely fell apart at the first washing.

Since I have to mailorder stuff in long length exchanges are a real PITA.  At my old job I could wear khakis so had Dockers and there was never a problem, but dressy slacks seem to cost more for less in quality.

I'd love suggestions of non-sukky brands of office wear if any of you commute at a business-casual or suit job.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: stefrrr on July 14, 2008, 06:19:08 pm
Yep. I don't know what it is - but it seems like the hems always come undone.  :headscratch:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: LicketySplat on July 14, 2008, 10:43:16 pm
I always used to just fold a skirt inside a towel and stow it in the saddlebags, and wear my riding pants over pantyhose.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: cultureslayer on July 14, 2008, 11:23:06 pm

I always used to just fold a skirt inside a towel and stow it in the saddlebags, and wear my riding pants over pantyhose.

I ruin pantyhose at an alarming rate just doing nothing, couldn't imagine them near the velcro on my overpants.  :crazy:

Pantyhose are the devil's work and no good can come of them.  :lol:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Weaselette on July 15, 2008, 12:23:54 am
I shop from TravelSmith's web site. Most of the stuff goes into a saddlebag for the 10 mile commute and comes out smiling and wrinkle-free. I HATE pantyhose; almost never wear the fiendish stuff.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: bluepoof on July 15, 2008, 12:43:11 am

I shop from TravelSmith's web site.


Thanks for that tip! I'd never seen their site before and the stuff looks like my kind of thing (I generally shop at REI -- or, more accurately, rei-outlet.com) and the prices aren't bad.  :thumbsup:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: stefrrr on July 15, 2008, 12:51:04 am
Sierra trading post has some of the same brands as Travelsmith - less selection, but better prices.  :inlove: Ex Officio.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jadziadax8 on July 15, 2008, 12:26:57 pm
New question - anyone else find that women's professional wear these days is the cheapest, most impractical crap out there?


By the sound of it, you probably wouldn't be able to shop there, but I absolutely love the fit and quality of Lane Bryant's clothes.  I have been going there for the last four years for my work clothes and have had the hem fall down on exactly one pair of slacks.  I do find that the inside buttons on their slacks tend to fall off, but I can understand why that happens (tough to sew on and make invisible).  Their dress shirts are completely indestructible.  The best part of LB is that their pants are not only sized by waist and length (only petite, avg, and tall) but also by hip size (so you can find pants that fit well if you're larger or smaller in the hips than the waist).  You can get any waist, hip, or length combination imaginable there.  I used to have to settle for bigger waist sizes to fit my thighs, and live with plumber's crack, but no more.  :thumbsup:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: elle~g on July 16, 2008, 10:11:02 am
Hi all... I've been lurking a bit and thought I'd step out with a question for the gals on here. I'm a complete newb - took the BRC and got licensed last fall, but only finally managed to acquire a bike that I can (nearly) flatfoot - thanks to my fiance who is supporting my habit by selling one of his bikes to pay for mine (is there any wonder I'm marrying this man?). In any event - despite it's relatively petite size, and much effort on my part, I can't for the life of me put the damn thing on the center stand. I'm not a complete weakling, but I'm no body builder either. My fiance has coached me through it, and I've watched some demos on YouTube - as far as I can tell, I'm doing what I'm supposed to be doing - but still no dice. Any pointers?  :headscratch:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: cultureslayer on July 16, 2008, 10:47:30 am

Hi all... I've been lurking a bit and thought I'd step out with a question for the gals on here. I'm a complete newb - took the BRC and got licensed last fall, but only finally managed to acquire a bike that I can (nearly) flatfoot - thanks to my fiance who is supporting my habit by selling one of his bikes to pay for mine (is there any wonder I'm marrying this man?). In any event - despite it's relatively petite size, and much effort on my part, I can't for the life of me put the damn thing on the center stand. I'm not a complete weakling, but I'm no body builder either. My fiance has coached me through it, and I've watched some demos on YouTube - as far as I can tell, I'm doing what I'm supposed to be doing - but still no dice. Any pointers?  :headscratch:

You have to find JUST the right place to push, pull, and I have to put all my weight onto the foot knob part of the center stand to get it up, and I've got a 250.  Also, has to be in neutral when you try to get it up.  Parking uphill helps as well.  Try it at first with it uphill, then once you can get it reliably try on level ground.

I am afraid to admit, I learned to adjust the valves before I could get it easily off and on the center stand.   :lol:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: bluepoof on July 16, 2008, 12:04:04 pm
Here's my trick:

Push the bike forward onto a 2x4 so that the rear wheel is up on the block.

That's the only way I've ever been able to get any of my bikes on the centerstand by myself.  :thumbsup:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs. DantesDame on July 16, 2008, 01:34:41 pm
Also, when rolling the bike off the center stand (and assuming that you're not sitting on the bike when doing this) have the handlebars angled towards you and the side stand down. That way the bike will come off the center stand towards you and then fall against the side stand if the balance is off.

Before I learned this trick I had my 1150 GS fall away from me, onto another bike  :crazy:  Never again!!!


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: bluepoof on July 16, 2008, 01:56:13 pm

Also, when rolling the bike off the center stand (and assuming that you're not sitting on the bike when doing this)


If you're short, you pretty much need to sit on the bike when rolling it off the centerstand. ;)


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: cultureslayer on July 16, 2008, 02:26:04 pm



If you're short, you pretty much need to sit on the bike when rolling it off the centerstand. ;)

I'm way too nervous taking it off the center stand unless I'm on it.  First and last time I tried being beside it, of course it fell away from me.  :(


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs. DantesDame on July 16, 2008, 03:00:55 pm


I'm way too nervous taking it off the center stand unless I'm on it.  First and last time I tried being beside it, of course it fell away from me.  :(


Blue just mentioned to me that she holds both bars when she takes hers down (or would, if she could reach both bars). My method is to essentially do the reverse of putting it up: one hand on the near handle bar and one hand on the grab bar at the rear of the bike. I lift slightly with the right hand, have the near bar turned in towards me and then pull the bike forward with the right hand. Yeah, I was pretty nervous the first few times but it seems to work well now.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: LicketySplat on July 16, 2008, 07:33:23 pm
It's been a long time since I put a bike on a centerstand, but I never had any trouble with my 490 lb ZX6-E. The thing is, you don't pull it up AT ALL, and don't listen to guys who tell you to pull.

Hold the bike upright with your hands on the handlebars. Put your foot on the lever lightly so that the feet of the centerstand just touch the ground on both sides. Now you have three points of contact and your bike is not going to fall over. When you're ready, step up onto the lever with as much of your weight as it takes - "all of it" is a perfectly safe answer. Just put some authority into it - put your weight onto the lever as though you were stepping up onto a high bench. That's it.

For your next trick, put a 470 lb YZF600R on a swingarm stand. THAT takes some acrobatics for a person our size  :lol:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: cultureslayer on July 16, 2008, 07:40:40 pm

For your next trick, put a 470 lb YZF600R on a swingarm stand. THAT takes some acrobatics for a person our size  :lol:

Nice thing about the 250, it's as easy to put on a swingarm stand as the centerstand.  :D


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jsanford on July 18, 2008, 01:31:43 am

Just came across this article - http://www.helmethairmagazine.com/culture-July2008pg2.html




Wow--an actual reason to go to New Hampshire.  :lol:

Seriously--I'm totally up for this, especially if that red F800 is a rental.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jadziadax8 on July 18, 2008, 10:25:12 am

Just came across this article - http://www.helmethairmagazine.com/culture-July2008pg2.html


Very cool!  


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: luvtoride on July 21, 2008, 06:48:56 pm
I agree about being parked uphill when trying to put a bike on a centerstand. Absolutely, it helps. It's all about leverage... & I know that. I sometimes still have a hard time w/ my bike. Of course it's a pig @ over 600lbs.

I use the 2 hands on the bars method to bring it down. I like having my hand on the brake lever. I can understand why small women have problems doing it this way, though.

Let us know if you get it, Heidi


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: elle~g on July 23, 2008, 06:34:55 am
Thanks for all of the advice, everyone. I realized that all along I may have had gravity fighting against me because our driveway has a slight hill to it and the bike was facing downhill. So, turned it around and came much closer to success. I only managed to get it on the centerstand when my fiance added the slightest bit of assistance with a little lift from the back, which at least gave me a sense of what it felt like, but, obviously, I want to be able to do it without assistance if possible. I took a little break from trying this past week partly because I started a new job and partly because I strained my back a bit from both trying to get it on the centerstand and also getting it up off the ground from its side.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Veda on July 23, 2008, 07:39:04 am
Practicing on an uphill sounds like a great idea for getting it on the stand... but how will you then get it off while on the uphill?  Sometimes I need a push getting it off the centerstand on level ground.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: LicketySplat on July 23, 2008, 08:38:02 am
+1 - getting the bike down off the centerstand on an upslope was always much harder for me than getting it onto the stand.

If you're on a hard level surface that you don't mind scratching (like a concrete garage floor), you can spin the bike around on the centerstand to face whatever direction you want.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Krismark on July 29, 2008, 09:06:57 pm
Wow, I guess I don't ever check this thread.


Back to Bluepoof's topic about the menstrual cup from a month or so ago...I have used the "Instead soft cup" and really liked it. Keep in mind there is no really nice way to empty it though. It pretty much something you do before a shower.


I use that, or OB tampons which take up virtually no space at all.


I never thought I would be talking about this on ST.N without a bunch of men chiming it to say stupid things though. They seem to be staying away quite nicely.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Weaselette on July 29, 2008, 09:11:10 pm
I use "Instead" all the time, and I suppose rearing children has prepared me for a certain amount of mess, because it doesn't bother me  :lol:

I'm really looking forward to having the whole bother over with for good and plenty at this time of life, though!


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: cultureslayer on July 29, 2008, 09:19:01 pm
The Diva and keeper and similar designs sit lower, so they are much easier to remove without mess and position correctly than the instead.  At least that's what I've heard from women that tried both, so I ended up with the diva cup.  Silly name but a good product.  It's nice to be able to pass up the tampon and pad display. :D


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Weaselette on July 30, 2008, 10:18:18 am
I'm more than willing to try the Diva, but haven't seen it at stores in NC Washington (a great place to ride, but not necessarily a shopping Mecca). Perhaps when we ride to the Big City I'll find a supply to try.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: cultureslayer on July 30, 2008, 08:28:57 pm

I'm more than willing to try the Diva, but haven't seen it at stores in NC Washington (a great place to ride, but not necessarily a shopping Mecca). Perhaps when we ride to the Big City I'll find a supply to try.

I ordered mine online, even with shipping it was $23 instead of paying the $32 suggested retail and tax on top of that.  I hesitated for a while because of the expense (in case it didn't work or something) but I think the manufacturer has a money back guarantee and I've not heard of anyone using it.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jadziadax8 on July 30, 2008, 11:01:12 pm

...the manufacturer has a money back guarantee...


Hopefully they don't restock if you send it back.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Krismark on July 30, 2008, 11:16:18 pm
Yeah...Instead isn't necessarily the best choice...plus theirs aren't supposed to be re-usable. I did anyway al least a couple times and they were fine.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: cultureslayer on July 31, 2008, 08:58:27 am



Hopefully they don't restock if you send it back.

They have discontinued the guarantee. :(

They also suggest buying a new one every year which is a bunch of crap.  You can boil them and they used to suggest replacing every 5 years.  I've talked with women that have used them that long and I have no idea why anyone would buy a new one every year.  Just sanitize it regularly (boiling water in an old glass jar is one of the suggestions I have seen).

Reducing their eco footprint my ass, they want to increase their profits.  :rolleyes:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jsanford on August 04, 2008, 01:57:10 am
is the Instead the diaphragm-like alternative?

User beware:  I got rid of mine after I had one good sneeze while using it.  :crazy:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: cultureslayer on August 04, 2008, 10:49:17 am

is the Instead the diaphragm-like alternative?

User beware:  I got rid of mine after I had one good sneeze while using it.  :crazy:
Yes, that's the Instead.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Stargzrgrl on August 04, 2008, 11:33:19 am

is the Instead the diaphragm-like alternative?

User beware:  I got rid of mine after I had one good sneeze while using it.  :crazy:


 :rofl:

btdtbtts...


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Stargzrgrl on August 04, 2008, 11:38:59 am
Anybody have any good tricks for getting rid of the lovely imprint a helmet liner such as a balaclava or Buff tends to leave on your face?

I'm sick of getting to work and dealing with the lovely imprint the Buff leaves on my forehead.  :crazy:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs. DantesDame on August 04, 2008, 04:44:32 pm

Anybody have any good tricks for getting rid of the lovely imprint a helmet liner such as a balaclava or Buff tends to leave on your face?

I'm sick of getting to work and dealing with the lovely imprint the Buff leaves on my forehead.  :crazy:


Turn it inside out so that the seam is not next to your skin?


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: stefrrr on August 05, 2008, 12:10:38 am

Anybody have any good tricks for getting rid of the lovely imprint a helmet liner such as a balaclava or Buff tends to leave on your face?

I'm sick of getting to work and dealing with the lovely imprint the Buff leaves on my forehead.  :crazy:


I do a weird little routine when putting my helmet on over the buff - basically, I pull the buff out to its full length, whip it across my hand (rawr  :lol:) so that the ends unroll and are nice and flat, then I do the whole turn my head upside down and pull the buff on. I make sure that the buff is not on my face, just barely covering my hair, then I tilt my head back and shove on the helmet. It works, but I have no bangs, so if the buff goes back on my head a little, it's no big deal and I don't have any fly-aways.

If the buff is on my forehead, I'm in for a lot of pain. I need a new helmet.  :(

The KBC TK8 fits really well. I might try it, but I'll miss my Suomy anti-fog. I've never seen another brand that works as well.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: tarzan77 on August 10, 2008, 11:29:09 am
Quick question for you all.  Currently I have a pair of Oxtar Sunray boots in a 37, I've been pretty happy w/them, but started getting pretty nasty pain midfoot from them being too narrow.  Since I've stopped wearing them, the pain is gone.  Now I'm on a quest for a decent weatherproof boot similar to this.  Primarily I will be using them for commuting - so walking is a couple blocks in from the parking lot, but also I plan on doing a moto-camping trip in a few weeks.  Do any of you have a suggestions for this type of boot for a wider foot in women's sizing?  Do any of you just use the men's sizing (in a boot like the A* Web Gortex or something similar)?

Stacey


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: cultureslayer on August 10, 2008, 11:43:09 am

Quick question for you all.  Currently I have a pair of Oxtar Sunray boots in a 37, I've been pretty happy w/them, but started getting pretty nasty pain midfoot from them being too narrow.  Since I've stopped wearing them, the pain is gone.  Now I'm on a quest for a decent weatherproof boot similar to this.  Primarily I will be using them for commuting - so walking is a couple blocks in from the parking lot, but also I plan on doing a moto-camping trip in a few weeks.  Do any of you have a suggestions for this type of boot for a wider foot in women's sizing?  Do any of you just use the men's sizing (in a boot like the A* Web Gortex or something similar)?

Stacey

I wear men's boots for the extra width.

Another option is to get the women's boots a half size too big and add some nice insoles.  I do this with all my commuting/touring boots.  I'd need a 39 for track boots, but I buy 40s and put in the insoles.  They add so much to the all day comfort because most motorcycle boots aren't padded.  As a bonus you can buy a $5 or $10 pair of insoles when the old ones wear out and the boots are as comfortable as the day you got them.  :bigok:  since I don't own a car making my boots as comfortable as possible for as long as possible is a major concern.  I found a bunch of insoles (despite being men's boots I buy women's insoles since they fit my feet better) at big lots for $2 a pair and now I won't have to buy them for another year or two.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: katego on August 10, 2008, 11:46:00 am
I recently started wearing the TCX/Oxtar Men's Infinity boot. In a 40 it is a little roomier than the Sunray of the same size. They are ok for walking for a few blocks, though I wouldn't go on a hike or anything.

-k


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jsanford on August 12, 2008, 01:34:35 am
I tromped around in Japan with Sidi Canyons, with Superfeet insoles.  Goretex lined.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: stefrrr on August 19, 2008, 10:38:48 pm
To go back to an old topic... I bought a Diva cup a few months ago. I'm not exaggerating when I say that it has changed my life. Well, for a few days a month, that is.  :lol:  It's already paid for itself. If anyone has any other questions, shoot me a pm.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: ~Lola~ on August 20, 2008, 01:05:23 am

Okay Ladies... I have a question for you.  Do you find that you ride worse on the day or so before your period, and on the first day or two of your period?  I didn't make the connection at first... just thought I was having a really bad day, but then it happened a couple more times, and each time it was on those days for me.  Anyone else have the same experience?  


Riding is the BEST thing for my cramps.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: ReynoldsFH439 on August 23, 2008, 06:18:22 pm

To go back to an old topic... I bought a Diva cup a few months ago. I'm not exaggerating when I say that it has changed my life. Well, for a few days a month, that is.  :lol:  It's already paid for itself. If anyone has any other questions, shoot me a pm.


I will say again that I love my Keeper.  For the first time I was actually smart enough to put it in before I started on the day I was expecting it.  It was wonderful because I was out for the whole day and I didn't have to think about it.  

Has anyone noticed their period is longer with the Keeper/Diva Cup/other equivalent?  I am usually about 4 days on tampons and more like 5 with the Keeper.  I forget it more easily, so I guess that kind of balances it out, though.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: cultureslayer on August 23, 2008, 06:28:19 pm



I will say again that I love my Keeper.  For the first time I was actually smart enough to put it in before I started on the day I was expecting it.  It was wonderful because I was out for the whole day and I didn't have to think about it.  

Has anyone noticed their period is longer with the Keeper/Diva Cup/other equivalent?  I am usually about 4 days on tampons and more like 5 with the Keeper.  I forget it more easily, so I guess that kind of balances it out, though.

Maybe the first day is a little heavier?  They aren't as irregular now that I'm on armour thyroid, but still not anything close to regular so it's hard to say.  Putting it in when you are expecting your period is one of the best parts.  Can't do that with tampons, and who wants to use a pad a minute more than they have to?  :crazy:

Mrs. BMW-K, I am too lazy to multi-quote so I'll just say I am more tired for several days before and my riding suffers a little because of that.  Then the first day is usually percocet time so no riding then.  


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Weaselette on August 31, 2008, 01:50:32 pm


Has anyone noticed their period is longer with the Keeper/Diva Cup/other equivalent?  I am usually about 4 days on tampons and more like 5 with the Keeper.  I forget it more easily, so I guess that kind of balances it out, though.


FOUR days?? FIVE days? *sob* I go a full seven days no matter what. If I had the time to recuperate this winter, I'd have the plumbing yanked out entirely.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: UFO on August 31, 2008, 01:52:10 pm
(tiptoes quietly out of thread...)  :couch:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Weaselette on August 31, 2008, 01:59:45 pm
 :lmao: :rofl: :lmao:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Black Ice on August 31, 2008, 03:46:43 pm

(tiptoes quietly out of thread...)  :couch:


Hmph.  Men.   :rolleyes:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs. DantesDame on August 31, 2008, 04:08:13 pm



FOUR days?? FIVE days? *sob* I go a full seven days no matter what. If I had the time to recuperate this winter, I'd have the plumbing yanked out entirely.


I've always known that I've been fortunate with my three days. And with the regularity of The Pill, I can count on Tuesday - Thursday, leaving my weekends "free" year 'round  :thumbsup:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jadziadax8 on August 31, 2008, 05:26:54 pm

FOUR days?? FIVE days? *sob* I go a full seven days no matter what. If I had the time to recuperate this winter, I'd have the plumbing yanked out entirely.


I found that once I started exercising regularly, my periods went down from 7 to 4-5 days.  The treadmill is good for many things.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Weaselette on August 31, 2008, 06:03:25 pm



I found that once I started exercising regularly, my periods went down from 7 to 4-5 days.  The treadmill is good for many things.


Dammit!! Don't tell me that exercise is good for THAT too? I've done my best to avoid it as much as possible.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jadziadax8 on August 31, 2008, 06:41:47 pm

Dammit!! Don't tell me that exercise is good for THAT too? I've done my best to avoid it as much as possible.


 :lol:

Yup, sorry.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: ReynoldsFH439 on September 04, 2008, 01:03:05 am

 

I've always known that I've been fortunate with my three days. And with the regularity of The Pill, I can count on Tuesday - Thursday, leaving my weekends "free" year 'round  :thumbsup:


Yeah... I am fortunately pretty regular on my own.  I was on the pill for awhile but OSVS made me get off because of the depression it caused.  I've always had some level of it, so I didn't really notice.  I guess now that I'm off I see the difference.  I certainly don't feel my best the week of my period anymore...


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Ears on September 04, 2008, 11:07:23 am

 I've always known that I've been fortunate with my three days. And with the regularity of The Pill, I can count on Tuesday - Thursday, leaving my weekends "free" year 'round  :thumbsup:



I've got to say it..... No one else has....

I just go with the flow.  :lol:

While I don't have a short 3 day, my fade-in, 6 day, fade out has always been consistent.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Weaselette on September 04, 2008, 10:36:38 pm




I've got to say it..... No one else has....

I just go with the flow

Aiieeeeeeeeeee!   :lol: No fade in here, more like BLAMMM the dam burst.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: TripleA on September 05, 2008, 04:11:35 pm
 :eek: I'm sort of shocked at how this "STN's Pool of Knowledge for Woman Riders" turned into a discussion about aunt flo.   Strange... anyway... It will definitely keep the men out, that's for sure.  

I have a question for you though.  Do any of you work on your own bike?  And if so, how did you learn how to do it?  I'm good at checking my air pressures, and checking the oil level, but I would like to learn more about my bike and be able to fix anything should the need arise (i.e oil changes, tire changes, brakes, etc).  I'm not much of a grease monkey, but I'm not afraid of getting dirty (I'm a geologist and play in dirt).  Did you guys take classes?  Did you learn from someone, husband, SO, etc?    I'm asking too, because I own a BMW, and the nearest BMW shop for motorcycles is a good hour and half away!  

Thanks in advance!


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: cultureslayer on September 05, 2008, 04:18:05 pm

 :eek: I'm sort of shocked at how this "STN's Pool of Knowledge for Woman Riders" turned into a discussion about aunt flo.   Strange... anyway... It will definitely keep the men out, that's for sure.  

I have a question for you though.  Do any of you work on your own bike?  And if so, how did you learn how to do it?  I'm good at checking my air pressures, and checking the oil level, but I would like to learn more about my bike and be able to fix anything should the need arise (i.e oil changes, tire changes, brakes, etc).  I'm not much of a grease monkey, but I'm not afraid of getting dirty (I'm a geologist and play in dirt).  Did you guys take classes?  Did you learn from someone, husband, SO, etc?    I'm asking too, because I own a BMW, and the nearest BMW shop for motorcycles is a good hour and half away!  

Thanks in advance!

My father  taught me some basic stuff (mostly as a way to keep it apart and me off of it  :rolleyes:) and I learned the rest from my boyfriend, bike specific forums (ninja250.net) or the shop manual.  


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs. DantesDame on September 05, 2008, 04:45:23 pm

   I have a question for you though.  Do any of you work on your own bike?  And if so, how did you learn how to do it?  I'm good at checking my air pressures, and checking the oil level, but I would like to learn more about my bike and be able to fix anything should the need arise (i.e oil changes, tire changes, brakes, etc).  I'm not much of a grease monkey, but I'm not afraid of getting dirty (I'm a geologist and play in dirt).  Did you guys take classes?  Did you learn from someone, husband, SO, etc?    I'm asking too, because I own a BMW, and the nearest BMW shop for motorcycles is a good hour and half away!  


I work on my own bike as little as I have to (I'm in the middle of switching out tires on the KLR right now; needed a break from the heat). I "learned" by inviting knowledgeable friends over the "help". I try to pay attention to what they're doing, and some friends are more adept at explaining what they're doing and why. Usually it takes a couple of visits before I'm comfortable doing it on my own (especially for something like a valve-check on the KLR; even now I'm not too keen to tackle it alone).

I didn't notice which BMW you have, but if it's an R series, those are dead-easy to do work on! I can check/adjust the valves on the GS in less than an hour, and that includes messing around with the crash bars that are in the way. And oil changes are a snap on just about any unfaired bike  :thumbsup:

Best route, IMO, is to have someone show you once and then you do it next time while they watch. Hands on is the only way to go for me.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Weaselette on September 05, 2008, 06:53:17 pm
All righty, back to bikes, ever so much more fun. I don't work on mine, mainly because I don't want to invalidate the warranty. I'd like to learn, though, if an opportunity presents itself when I have the time-- basic all 'round wrenching. 'Course then my husband would want me to do HIS too, he hates mechanics.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: LicketySplat on September 05, 2008, 08:22:54 pm
I enjoy working with my hands, so I was messing around with my first bike before I really knew what I was doing  :rolleyes:

Then I married an ex-motorcycle mechanic with a full Snap-On tool chest  :inlove: :inlove: Sometimes he'd rather do something himself than spend the patience to teach me - but I insist.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jadziadax8 on September 06, 2008, 10:55:55 am

I have a question for you though.  Do any of you work on your own bike?  And if so, how did you learn how to do it?  I'm good at checking my air pressures, and checking the oil level, but I would like to learn more about my bike and be able to fix anything should the need arise (i.e oil changes, tire changes, brakes, etc).  I'm not much of a grease monkey, but I'm not afraid of getting dirty (I'm a geologist and play in dirt).  Did you guys take classes?  Did you learn from someone, husband, SO, etc?    I'm asking too, because I own a BMW, and the nearest BMW shop for motorcycles is a good hour and half away!  

Thanks in advance!


Mostly, my husband and I are learning how to do bike repairs on our own.  There's a guy up in Zion (Denny, AKA Seeker) who does repairs out of his garage.  He's awesome because he'll let you watch what he does, and taught us how to do valve adjusts, change tires, etc.  He even sold us his old tire changer for $10 when he bought his new NoMar one.  Bomber has also been generous with access to the Entropy Lab (ask him about the monkey!) and even gave us his old repair bench.  Other than that, we go to model specific forums and get the instructions for how to do whatever we want.  Oil changes are simple, as long as you have a pan and a filter wrench (both can be had at AutoZone).  In fact, I'm changing my oil tomorrow, so if you want to come over from Winfield, I'd be happy to show you how it's done.  PM me.  I'm in Glendale Heights.

P.S.  What do you do as a geologist?  Teach at CoD?  Work in industry?  I teach physics in the physical science department at Harper College, which incorporates physics, geology, astronomy, and physical science.  We're always looking for good adjuncts if you've got an M.S.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jsanford on September 06, 2008, 01:16:37 pm
A local community college offered a ten-night basic mainteance course.  It was a great class--really de-mystified the bike.

So now I read instructions and learn from others' experience on the 'net and ask questions, even from my mechanic.  I don't start anything without understanding (or believing I understand) what I'm doing.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: TripleA on September 08, 2008, 05:16:42 pm


P.S.  What do you do as a geologist?  Teach at CoD?  Work in industry?  I teach physics in the physical science department at Harper College, which incorporates physics, geology, astronomy, and physical science.  We're always looking for good adjuncts if you've got an M.S.


In the state of Illinois, there is not much 'geology' to be done.   I am an environmental consultant and assist property owners in cleaning up their contaminated sites (i.e. leaking gas stations, etc) according to Illinois EPA regulations by conducting soil and groundwater surveys to determine contaminant transport.    It's a dirty job, but someone has to do it.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: bluepoof on September 08, 2008, 11:23:47 pm

I don't work on mine, mainly because I don't want to invalidate the warranty.


Aha! Thanks to the Magnusson-Moss Act  (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnuson-Moss_Warranty_Act), working on your own bike won't affect the warranty. Wrench away with impunity!

Oh, and as for the original question, I do all the work on Peter's and my bikes.  I learned from the service manuals, online resources, and lots of trial and error. :lol:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: lionlady on September 10, 2008, 06:00:56 pm

 I have a question for you though.  Do any of you work on your own bike?  And if so, how did you learn how to do it?  I'm good at checking my air pressures, and checking the oil level, but I would like to learn more about my bike and be able to fix anything should the need arise (i.e oil changes, tire changes, brakes, etc).  I'm not much of a grease monkey, but I'm not afraid of getting dirty (I'm a geologist and play in dirt).  Did you guys take classes?  Did you learn from someone, husband, SO, etc?    I'm asking too, because I own a BMW, and the nearest BMW shop for motorcycles is a good hour and half away!  

Thanks in advance!


I learned at Tech Days held at fellow BMW club members' homes.  :D I attended one or two first, just to watch and socialize. Then, I showed up and did my own 12K service, with guidance from several knowledgeable fellows. That was a cool feeling!!

Since the boxer engine is such an easy thing to get into, I'm not surprised that private Tech Days seem to be mostly a BMW rider thing.

P


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jadziadax8 on September 20, 2008, 09:06:45 pm
New topic: what's the best "OMG! It's a girl on a bike!" moment?

Mine came tonight.  I headed over to Oberweis dairy to pick up my free quart of ice cream (thanks Heartland Blood Center!).  I pulled into a free spot, and a woman in the car in the next spot, who was talking on her cell phone, yells out her window that I have a nice bike.  I say thanks, and she says "OMG you're a girl!  You go girl!"  I got a good laugh out of that one.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: ReynoldsFH439 on September 22, 2008, 06:08:46 am

New topic: what's the best "OMG! It's a girl on a bike!" moment?

Mine came tonight.  I headed over to Oberweis dairy to pick up my free quart of ice cream (thanks Heartland Blood Center!).  I pulled into a free spot, and a woman in the car in the next spot, who was talking on her cell phone, yells out her window that I have a nice bike.  I say thanks, and she says "OMG you're a girl!  You go girl!"  I got a good laugh out of that one.


It's not quite the same, but when I went to the DMV to take my written test and get my permit, a guy in the line next to me asked "Ah! So you're going to be a motorcycle mama?" in a good-natured sort of way.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: mrwog on September 24, 2008, 10:17:33 pm

I have been much more fortunate finding women's sized gear in the last two years.  The industry is finally figuring out we have bucks to spend and more women are riding.  


Hello Barb...Mr. Wog here
Taking some time off the ZRX forum eh.
Welcome Malady
Paul


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: R6Chick on September 27, 2008, 12:25:30 am

I've always known that I've been fortunate with my three days. And with the regularity of The Pill, I can count on Tuesday - Thursday, leaving my weekends "free" year 'round  :thumbsup:


I was on Norplant for 15 years and never had a period that lasted more than three days. Year 1 - no period at all, Year 2 - 1 period every 6 months, Year 3 - 1 period every 3 months, Year 4 - 1 period every other month, Years 5 to 15 - 1 per month on a precise schedule that was literally predictable down to the hour.

Now I have just finished my first year on Implanon and no period at all so far. I am hoping to stay with that pattern for the remaining two years before I have to get a new one.

I think the best part is that it makes everything lighter, eases of the PMS big time, almost no cramps or back pain, and I am not nearly as worn out like I was before Norplant/Implanon.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: R6Chick on September 27, 2008, 12:28:59 am

I have a question for you though.  Do any of you work on your own bike?  And if so, how did you learn how to do it?  I'm good at checking my air pressures, and checking the oil level, but I would like to learn more about my bike and be able to fix anything should the need arise (i.e oil changes, tire changes, brakes, etc).  I'm not much of a grease monkey, but I'm not afraid of getting dirty (I'm a geologist and play in dirt).  Did you guys take classes?  Did you learn from someone, husband, SO, etc?


I have some friends teach me a few things but mostly I learned from the shop manual. I bought myself a decent set of basic tools then built on that set as time went on. Every bike I ever got I immediately bought the shop manual for.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: bluepoof on September 28, 2008, 11:48:51 pm
OK, here's a girly question.

I used to bring a piece of my Neutrogena (original formula) face bar with me on rides.  I'd also use hotel soap with no problems.

Lately, though, my face has gotten *really* windburned and dry on all-day rides, even when I use lots of my daily moisturizer (30 SPF) plus sunscreen.

Nothing has changed with my gear or riding style, so I think it's just my skin changing as I'm *cough* getting older.

What do you guys use for soap on the road?  Anything that cleans the road grime off but still has moisturizer in it (or at least won't take off the skin's natural oil)?


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: R6Chick on September 28, 2008, 11:55:46 pm

What do you guys use for soap on the road?  Anything that cleans the road grime off but still has moisturizer in it (or at least won't take off the skin's natural oil)?


I go straight for baby wipes. Longs has this section of travel size things. I go there and pick up all my must have tank bag supplies.

- 1 travel roll of charmin (I never worry about bathrooms lacking in supplies or emergency roadside needs)
- 1 travel pack of ass gaskets
- 1 travel back of baby wipes (these clean nicely and usually have moisturizer in them since dry crackly butt skin is frowned upon by babies and adults alike!)
1 - stick on 8 hour heat thing for neck (great when sore on long rides or caught in serious cold by surprise)
1 - stick on 8 hour heat thing for back (same reasoning as the neck one)
1 - travel size vaseline
1 - travel size bonds medicated powder
2 - tampons (1 regular, 1 super)

The whole kit fits in one quart size ziploc baggie.

Is this the bluepoof that is keeping Alibee so pleased at work?




Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Stargzrgrl on September 29, 2008, 12:14:28 am
I keep these in my tank bag for wiping off crap during pit stops:

(http://www.olay.com/images/product/detail/df1000de.jpg)

http://www.olay.com/boutique/dailyfacials/products/df1000

I use these at night:

(http://www.olay.com/images/product/detail/re1011de.jpg)

http://www.olay.com/boutique/regenerist/products/re1011


*edit*  I was going to post my whole on road skincare routine but it was bordering on getting ridiculous.  :p


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: bluepoof on September 29, 2008, 12:15:55 am


Is this the bluepoof that is keeping Alibee so pleased at work?


It is! I love me some Alibee.  :inlove:

I can't believe I didn't think of baby wipes. I love them and always carry them with me.

The 8-hr heat things are a *great* idea! Gonna stock up on those too.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: R6Chick on September 29, 2008, 12:17:40 am
The Oil of Olay stuff is really good. I have thought about adding a packet to my tank bag supply kit but I am not quite there yet. I try to keep multi-purpose stuff. I mean, you could wipe your hiney with the Oil of Olay stuff but I would feel all kinds of guilty using the expensive stuff for that.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Stargzrgrl on September 29, 2008, 12:31:18 am
 :lol:

I KNOW I listed the contents of my tank bag around here once upon a time.  I think it included almost every item you can find in a travel sized section of most drug stores and places like Target...

I like the Wet Ones For Sensitive Skin with Aloe travel size packets for hand and *ahem* hiney cleansing.

Burt's Bees Travel Kits are also a travel staple for me.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: cultureslayer on September 29, 2008, 07:38:01 am
I use Clearasil facial wipes, then a night moisturizer because I haven't found something with SPF that doesn't bother my skin.  If I wasn't so lazy I'd put some clean and clear pink liquid (deep cleaning astringent I think) on cotton squares in a freezer bag to carry with me.  It's the best.  

L'oreal cleansing wipes are free after rebate at Walgreens this month so I'll probably try those too.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: R6Chick on September 29, 2008, 02:21:55 pm

I haven't found something with SPF that doesn't bother my skin.  


Have you tried the Neutrogena with UVA/UVB protection and SPF ratings of 55, 75, and 80? My dermatologist turned me on to it. I use the highest SPF and it does not upset my skin at all. It is not greasy either.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: cultureslayer on September 29, 2008, 02:25:48 pm



Have you tried the Neutrogena with UVA/UVB protection and SPF ratings of 55, 75, and 80? My dermatologist turned me on to it. I use the highest SPF and it does not upset my skin at all. It is not greasy either.

Nope, haven't tried that.  Non-comodogenic coppertone, Almay moisturizer for acne prone skin with SPF 15, and Skinsimple SPF 15 were all a waste of money for me.  I was thinking about trying to find something PABA free by clearsil or clean and clear but I might try the neutrogena instead.  I'm certain it's the SPF, because the skinsimple night cream isn't a problem for it.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs. DantesDame on September 29, 2008, 02:57:12 pm



Have you tried the Neutrogena with UVA/UVB protection and SPF ratings of 55, 75, and 80? My dermatologist turned me on to it. I use the highest SPF and it does not upset my skin at all. It is not greasy either.


I understand that anything over 45 (?) is a waste, as the protection can only go *so* high anyway... :shrug:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: R6Chick on September 29, 2008, 03:47:02 pm

I understand that anything over 45 (?) is a waste, as the protection can only go *so* high anyway... :shrug:


I was under that impression myself until my dermatologist said to use the highest SPF with UVA/UVB available. My family has a history of several cancers including skin cancer so I am a pasty girl who is always using lots of sunscreen.

Everything I have read either says it helps or it is no better than SPF50 so it appears the jury is still out. What I do know is that the higher SPF does not cost more money and it sure does not hurt. With a cancer history in the family I am sticking to the highest I can get.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs. DantesDame on September 29, 2008, 04:37:43 pm


Everything I have read either says it helps or it is no better than SPF50 so it appears the jury is still out. What I do know is that the higher SPF does not cost more money and it sure does not hurt. With a cancer history in the family I am sticking to the highest I can get.



 :thumbsup: :thumbsup:  Better safe than sorry, I agree.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: stefrrr on October 01, 2008, 11:00:19 am

- 1 travel roll of charmin (I never worry about bathrooms lacking in supplies or emergency roadside needs)
- 1 travel pack of ass gaskets
- 1 travel back of baby wipes (these clean nicely and usually have moisturizer in them since dry crackly butt skin is frowned upon by babies and adults alike!)
1 - stick on 8 hour heat thing for neck (great when sore on long rides or caught in serious cold by surprise)
1 - stick on 8 hour heat thing for back (same reasoning as the neck one)
1 - travel size vaseline
1 - travel size bonds medicated powder
2 - tampons (1 regular, 1 super)


This list is genius!

I take little travel sizes of (facial) moisturizer along and use it regularly when riding. It's a little extra something to help protect the skin.  :thumbsup:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Stargzrgrl on October 16, 2008, 08:13:10 pm

I tromped around in Japan with Sidi Canyons, with Superfeet insoles.  Goretex lined.


I have a few questions for you and/or anyone else about the Sidi Canyon.

I need new boots and the Sidi Canyon Gore-tex are the front runner.  Have you had a chance to test the waterproof-ness of these boots yet?  Are they relatively warm?  How well do they breathe?  How long have you had them?  Would you buy them again if you had to replace them tomorrow?

Thanks in advance!  :bigok:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Veda on October 16, 2008, 10:11:16 pm
I don't have the Canyons but I have Sidi's Jasmine waterproof boots and find the waterproofing top notch.  I've been out in a handful of downpour/flash floods situations where every inch of my clothes are soaked through and my feet are the only thing left dry.   :thumbsup:  The only fail there is when the water is higher than the top of your boot  :lol:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: R6Chick on October 16, 2008, 10:18:58 pm

I don't have the Canyons but I have Sidi's Jasmine waterproof boots and find the waterproofing top notch.  I've been out in a handful of downpour/flash floods situations where every inch of my clothes are soaked through and my feet are the only thing left dry.   :thumbsup:  The only fail there is when the water is higher than the top of your boot  :lol:


I have ahd the same outstanding result with my Oxtars.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: stefrrr on October 17, 2008, 12:35:27 pm
I have Alpinestars Ridge Boots because I have ankle problems. I've liked them a lot, but the waterproof went on them after about 2 years, at ESTN last month, AKA the weekend of eternal rain.  :o

So... my options are:
try to re-waterproof them with my leather care kit.
Use Gore-tex socks
buy the same boot in a 1/2 size up that the dealership hasn't been able to sell since I bought mine.
buy completely different boots, maybe that fit better and are easier to walk in.

They held up really well in a lowspeed lowside I had a year and a half ago, and until now they've been really waterproof. They just got completely soaked through at ESTN.

What do you guys think? Is that kind of non-waterproofness to be expected, or should I find something better?


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jsanford on October 17, 2008, 11:39:10 pm



I have a few questions for you and/or anyone else about the Sidi Canyon.

I need new boots and the Sidi Canyon Gore-tex are the front runner.  Have you had a chance to test the waterproof-ness of these boots yet?  Are they relatively warm?  How well do they breathe?  How long have you had them?  Would you buy them again if you had to replace them tomorrow?


Yes and yes--my feet have been soaked.  They do much better than my Vertebra Tepors, which do soak through.  I've had them since March.  They breathe just fine and dried out overnight after getting wet Wednesday.

I'd buy them again.  I can't say the same for the Vertebras, incidentally--I just broke the zipper for the third time.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: GEMINIJANE on October 19, 2008, 12:48:44 am
My newest boots are still waterproof (but still a bit stiff, too).  My others that are broken in and most comfortable cannot be trusted when it rains :( .  One friend, who happens to be a motorcycle dealer and also a rider for about 45 years, swears there is no such thing as a "forever" waterproof boot.  Now, I just pack a pair of Seal Skins waterproof socks and wear them on the days that rain is predicted.  I find them to be comfortable so wearing them is not an issue.  P.S.  If you are ever touring and find yourself with the wet feet problem, picking up a couple of subway sandwich plastic bags is a short term answer.  Just put on dry socks and put a bag on your foot before you put that soggy boot back on.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: VIVID1 on October 19, 2008, 05:42:03 pm

One friend, who happens to be a motorcycle dealer and also a rider for about 45 years, swears there is no such thing as a "forever" waterproof boot.  


My Daytona Lady Star GTX have +100,000 miles on them, I've worn them since 2003. Still as waterproof as the day I got them :thumbsup:



Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: R6Chick on October 19, 2008, 05:44:43 pm

My Daytona Lady Star GTX have about 90,000-100,000 miles on them, I've worn them since 2003. Still as waterproof as the day I got them :thumbsup:


I have had the same luck with my Oxtars. I wear them all winter, every winter, and they are as waterproof today as they were when I got them four years ago. I commute on my bike putting between 10k - 15k miles a year so my winter boots are used daily all winter long.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: bluepoof on October 19, 2008, 05:46:09 pm

My Daytona Lady Star GTX have +100,000 miles on them, I've worn them since 2003. Still as waterproof as the day I got them :thumbsup:


Another :inlove: for the LadyStar GTX boots.  I'm on my second pair; the first pair only lost its waterproofing because I caught a sharp rock offroad and it cut a hole in the leather (that's why I replaced them).


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: LicketySplat on October 19, 2008, 06:06:27 pm
Good info on the boots - I think I'm going to be due for a new pair before too long. But this question is on...

Adjustable/short reach levers

Yesterday was my first ride of the season in my winter gloves, and I finally decided I'm just fed up with having to choose between feeling my fingers and reaching my brake.

Who's got aftermarket levers? What brand, what's your glove size, how do you like them? If you installed them yourself, were there any issues - hose length, hose routing, switch assembly, wires, anything else?


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: GEMINIJANE on October 19, 2008, 09:37:33 pm



Another :inlove: for the LadyStar GTX boots.  I'm on my second pair; the first pair only lost its waterproofing because I caught a sharp rock offroad and it cut a hole in the leather (that's why I replaced them).


That's what my new ones are and I'm lovin' them.  FYI: There is a pair of Oxtar's for sale on the ADVrider.com yard sale for $42 (size 37 EU which is what I wear with a heavy sock - size 6'ish?)  However, in a later post the seller says he found a spot selling the same women's Oxtar's for $25 new!  My husband loved his and tried to get a new pair and said they no longer made them, which may be why the close-out prices.  Might take advantage and pick up a $200 boot for $25!  (I just love saving money!) :lol:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: stefrrr on October 20, 2008, 01:54:21 am

I have been much more fortunate finding women's sized gear in the last two years.  The industry is finally figuring out we have bucks to spend and more women are riding.  


I think I know of you from EOS, yes?


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: katego on October 20, 2008, 11:13:07 pm



I have ahd the same outstanding result with my Oxtars.


I am on my third pair of oxtar/tcx. They always keep my feet dry.

-k


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Laura0107 on October 21, 2008, 11:37:16 am

Good info on the boots - I think I'm going to be due for a new pair before too long. But this question is on...

Adjustable/short reach levers

Yesterday was my first ride of the season in my winter gloves, and I finally decided I'm just fed up with having to choose between feeling my fingers and reaching my brake.

Who's got aftermarket levers? What brand, what's your glove size, how do you like them? If you installed them yourself, were there any issues - hose length, hose routing, switch assembly, wires, anything else?


My hands are not that small (I wear mens L gloves), but I still wanted adjustable levers.  I have Pazzos (6-position) and like them.  No issues with the installation on my Sprint.  The Pazzos retail for about $180 for both levers, or you can buy them separately for about $95.  CRG levers are very similar to the Pazzos.  If you think you'd need more adjustability than that, look at ASV levers, but they cost more.

If you have small hands, I'd stay with the full-length levers as opposed to the shorty versions.  My clutch is a "hoss" and I'm glad I stayed with a full-length lever and am able to use leverage to my advantage (it's easier to pull out near the end of the lever).


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: vtbandit on October 23, 2008, 12:32:04 pm
Hi - Just joined ST.N a few days ago.  I've been on other message boards and eventually they figure out I'm a woman - it use to just be easier that way.  This is AWESOME.  Totally laughed, checked out links, thought, 'absolutely, I feel the same way!' ....

In the middle of a long trip with my husband and a guy friend we decided to do a 1000 mile day - or see if we could. Sure, I don't know if I can't until I try.  Yea, I'd started my period the day before... every 100 miles we'd stop, get gas, get a drink, go potty, and I'd take ibuprofen.  Oh, and it was also the day after my birthday on which  I melted chocolate on my 'mini dash' and cried. Jesus, just remembering how pathetic I felt still makes me shake my head... and laugh.  

We had a great trip but 'birthday' became a code word for period for eternity.  :lol:

I'd love it if this wasn't just one super long thread... Read the first 5 pages but unfortunately have a life I have to get to. Besides... spent the morning researching and buying hard bags for the B1250 for a L-o-n-g trip this summer.  

So glad to have found you!



Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: vtbandit on October 26, 2008, 09:49:22 am



Very cool!  


Got back to read some of the pages I couldn't read the other day...  This article was about Judy Mirro
 and the Women's Riding School she organizes.  I attended in 2006 and 2008.  We had really new riders and very experienced riders there.  This past year I particularly had an incredible day.  Highly recommend it to anyone wanting to improve their riding skills.  Judy is a completely wonderful person.. Heard yesterday that Penguin Schools are interested in having WRS associated with their schools. Way to go Judy!


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Virginian on October 29, 2008, 07:33:09 pm
I have an odd question to ask the ladies of ST.N and figured I would start here. My parents were very accomplished motorcyclists and have enjoyed traveling all over the world together on bikes for 25 years. My father passed away from alzheimer's about three years ago. My mother lost her will to ride anymore and I’ve been working with her to regain her new life without pop. She recently purchased another bike at the ripe young age of 76 and is back at.

I have chatted with a few women on a couple of the organized ST.N rides about this and they suggested that I try to get her to post and maybe encourage some other women to ride their own bike. Maybe post some ride reports of yesteryear. I guess it’s a generational thing but she’s not willing to log on and share some of her tales so I asked her to type it out and I would post it. Amazing, she can ride a bike around the world, bust my ballz for 46 years but it’s out of her comfort zone to write in a forum.  :headscratch:

Well, I’m the proverbial dog that has caught the car now. She sent me fifteen page ride report  :crazy: on one of their trips from Orange County, CA to Leesburg, VA via Canada. I was shocked at the length and detail. But, maybe it would be a good read on a cold winter day and inspire someone to have a go.

Do you feel there would be enough interest to read a lengthy ride report with no pictures? I’ll have to tackle the “how to scan pics” issue later on. If there’s enough interest I was thinking about posting it here in the gal’s forum which was the original intent.

Thanks for reading this post and please be candid with your thoughts. I don’t want to tax the forum if this is dribble.

Sincerely,

Eric


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: stromgal on October 29, 2008, 10:34:53 pm
Yes, of course, post her report pics or no.  Fer pete's sake, do you realize the kind of drivel we are willing to read here on STN?!? Naming no names, of course.  :D


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: bluepoof on October 30, 2008, 12:10:49 am
I would LOVE to read it.  :inlove:

Also, I'm sorry to hear about your dad.  My dad passed away from Alzheimer's as well and I know how much that sucks.  :(


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jsanford on October 30, 2008, 12:31:41 am
Another vote for posting it, verbatim from her email.  There's so few firsthand stories from long-time women riders.

This is awesome: she document a bit of your family history.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Weaselette on November 01, 2008, 03:28:08 pm
So sorry for your loss, but please do post, your mother sounds like a real inspiration. Occasionally I wonder what age I'll be when I finally stop riding, and it's good to know that I can keep inching that number upwards....


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Busy Little Whiner on November 01, 2008, 05:45:47 pm



I understand that anything over 45 (?) is a waste,


Correct...

(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1046/644017825_e9b8912425_o.jpg)


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: LicketySplat on November 02, 2008, 01:26:50 pm
Eric, I'd read it for sure, but I wonder if it deserves a wider audience. What about submitting it to a magazine?

My condolences to you both for the loss of your father.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Shoganai on November 03, 2008, 05:09:31 am

 :eek: I'm sort of shocked at how this "STN's Pool of Knowledge for Woman Riders" turned into a discussion about aunt flo.   Strange... anyway... It will definitely keep the men out, that's for sure.  

I have a question for you though.  Do any of you work on your own bike?  And if so, how did you learn how to do it?  
Thanks in advance!



Hi, I started working on my bike because it was 3 hours to the nearest BMW shop.

At first I was scared to death I would make what ever I was trying to fix worse or couldn't put it back together.
1. I bought the BMW service manual and the Clymer. They each serve different needs.
2. I used the internet as a HUGE dictionary and Ref. Lib. There's nothing I could face that has not already been over come, fixed or improved by someone else.
3. I joined ADV and asked for help, including taking pics of the issues at hand. I recieved fun, funny and real good help.
4. When working on my bike, I would take pics so I can review what it looked like BEFORE I tore it apart. (very good for back tracking)
5. I met a man who worked with me, and taught me a lot. As a matter of fact, we are getting married soon, and it all started with us working on my bike in 2006. :inlove:

My best advice is not fear it. "Fear is the mind killer" - Dune

It's just a bike.
If you try and fail, at least you tried, and the shop will put it right.
I know it's a tired saying, but it's so damn true: "Knowledge is power".

Power over you situation if you are broke down and can fix it and get back on the road.
Power to control what is done to your bike and how.
Power to explore the inner working of the machine you are trusting with your life.

And last but NOT least, you'll be Empowered to go further, adventure deeper, and explore lonely places alone and confidently.


http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=220358
The Shop Whore Gets Naked (thread covering many wrenching stories)


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Shoganai on November 03, 2008, 05:22:06 am

Lately, though, my face has gotten *really* windburned and dry on all-day rides, even when I use lots of my daily moisturizer (30 SPF) plus sunscreen.


I use this exclusively. Pro-Tech-Skin (Since 1990)

http://www.atsko.com/products/skin-hair-care/pro-tech-skin.html

Apply once in the morning to lips, nose and cheeks thinnly. That's it.
It's a beeswax base, so it seals the skin.
You can't wear make-up with it.
It washes off with soap and water.




Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Shoganai on November 03, 2008, 05:56:20 am

New topic: what's the best "OMG! It's a girl on a bike!" moment?



I have two kinds of fuel stops; 1) don't even take my gloves off kind and 2) off go the gloves, jacket and helmet and it might include pee and drink.

This was going to be a fuel stop type #2.
Summer, weekend, and the south; lots of bikes out there.
Helmet comes off, 40'ish male near his bike says, "Hi, nice bike". Now keep in mind I was on a dirty, over-loaded K1100RS with rags for fork gaiters on a very long trip. I nod and half-assed waved as I peeled my jacket off.

He comes over and wants to chat, and I'm a bit road punched and just want to stop vibrating from 10 hours riding. So, my mood was edgy, but I try to represent my sport with grace and tolerance.

We go thru the same old dance, 'where are you from', 'where are you going' and 'what does that do' while pointing at something on my bike. Then he said, what almost everybody gets around to, "Aren't you afraid to be out riding all by yourself?"

Now normally, I just say something like, "no, it's fun" and move on.

But like I said, I was not a real happy camper.


I replied sharply, "If I were a guy, would you have asked me that question!?"
He look suprised. I could clearly see he had never once thought of it like that.
He dropped his eyes briefly, and then said, "No, I guess your right".

The conversation didn't have any wind left in it and I didn't have the energy to carry it much further than, "Ride safe" and I went about finishing up my buiness as he ambled back to his bike.

Now, whenever I get asked that question I answer with the same words, but I'm much more pleasent about it.
I only hope to encourage those that ask to examine their bias and recognize it for what it is.





Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: vtbandit on November 03, 2008, 05:04:08 pm
Good point... good response to an oft asked question.

I feel like that a little when a guy I don't know very well will tell me how well I ride. I ride fine, but did he mention it to any of the other male riders that they were riding well?  

Maybe one of the nicer things our group leader said a few years back was, "I don't really think of you as a female, I think of you as a motorcyclist." :D  Though, my husband said he thought I could be both - thank you my sweet.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: ReynoldsFH439 on November 03, 2008, 05:09:38 pm
I think that could be difficult to gauge.  Are they making the comment because they are ignorant and therefor surprised to see a woman doing as well as a man, or is it a genuine comment that they express to you instead of the guys because they have no interest in starting a conversation with the guys?


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: vtbandit on November 03, 2008, 05:18:06 pm
Hm.. I was pleasant about it but I'm pretty sure he was surprised because I was a female.  I said thanks and his response was, "No, really. You took the corners and everything. My wife should ride with you."  Whatever.  I've gotten to know him - he's a good guy... there aren't that many women that ride to ride in the area.  Supoose that is why I find myself with a bunch of guys and why sometimes they're surprised.  



Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Shoganai on November 04, 2008, 04:20:33 am
I have a couple of questions.

1) Tell me about your dealer experiences as related to how you felt treated by the sales persons.
     A. Re: Bikes
     B. Re: Gear
     C. Re: Services

2) How do you feel about camping alone?


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: cultureslayer on November 04, 2008, 11:34:49 am

I have a couple of questions.

1) Tell me about your dealer experiences as related to how you felt treated by the sales persons.
     A. Re: Bikes
     B. Re: Gear
     C. Re: Services

2) How do you feel about camping alone?

Bikes: Never bought from a dealer, asked once about an old ninja 250 (before they were as popular) and they tried to tack $700 worth of delivery and setup fees on a $3k bike (in the middle of the winter!).  I didn't even feel like trying to negotiate so I just said no thanks, walked out the door and have bought 3 used bikes since then.

Gear: selection has ranged from bad to great (iron pony).  Sales people usually just assume my boyfriend is the one interested in gear if I go with him, otherwise they are sort of helpful but don't know too much about the women's gear  or how it fits most of the time.  

Services: No experience.  Only thing I've had done at a dealer was my totaled bike towed to one at insurance company's expense, and yearly inspections.

CAmping: I am ambivalent, so I only go camping when the boyfriend is there to set up the tent and start a fire.   :p


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: bluepoof on November 04, 2008, 11:56:52 am

I have a couple of questions.

1) Tell me about your dealer experiences as related to how you felt treated by the sales persons.
     A. Re: Bikes
     B. Re: Gear
     C. Re: Services

2) How do you feel about camping alone?


1)
    A. I've bought two bikes new from a sales person.  The first one doesn't really count as I was sick as a dog the day I bought the bike, but there was a special deal for that day only.  So my now-hubby did all the negotiations and I just signed the paperwork.  When I bought the second bike, hubby was also there, but he kept quiet and the salesperson was very good about talking to me and answering my questions.

    B. I buy most of my gear online or from a custom shop, so I've really only had good experiences here, too.  

    C. This one's the nightmare.  I do all of my own maintenance and services on the bike, but the few times when I've had to bring a bike into a shop (while touring, etc), the service guy will almost invariably talk to any nearby male instead of to me.  Once the guy wouldn't even look at me and insisted on only discussing MY bike with my husband...who had no idea what was going on and was only there to drive me back to work after I'd dropped off the bike.  

2) I camp alone all the time.  Love it.   :inlove:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: stefrrr on November 05, 2008, 08:55:17 pm
I did my first (non-TWO) solo camping trip a couple of weeks ago. The only problem I had was with some insensitive neighbors.

Then again, I snore loud enough that people probably think there's a 400 lb man in my tent. :lol:

I think I prefer it at moto-campgrounds, though. I'm really sociable, and I always want human companionship at the end of the day.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Shoganai on November 05, 2008, 10:23:40 pm
I always want human companionship at the end of the day.


Me too.

I met a man while traveling in North Dakota many years ago in a campground we were sharing. He was in his 60's and had all his worldly possessions in an old S-10 pickup that looked to be held together with spit and zip ties. What drew my attention was the beautiful banjo music he was making by his low fire. His voice was rich but cracked with years of smoking and yet earthy and humble. He would stop to take a scoop of beans from a can, wipe his mouth on the sleeve of his faded plaid shirt and start back on his song. He looked so happy and yet so alone.


I walked over and introduced myself and told him I had enjoyed his music and asked where he was going. He stood up and bowed a thank you and offered me a seat by the fire. I learned he was homeless and earned a little cash by singing for change. He was a military veteran, and disabled from combat.


We talked and sang together for a couple of hours and laughed about stories from the road. I remember how excited he was to have found a sturdy Styrofoam cup. He showed it to me by turning it this way and that in the dimming firelight to demonstrate how perfect it was going to be for his coffee in the morning. It was his road treasure that day.


I gave him some coffee to fill his beautiful Styrofoam cup in the morning, thanked him for the wonderful evening and went to crawl in my sleeping bag. He sang me to sleep that freezing, cold Dakota night. He was my road treasure.



Road treasures indeed both tangible and intangible.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: HappyRiding on November 06, 2008, 12:17:20 am

I have a couple of questions.

1) Tell me about your dealer experiences as related to how you felt treated by the sales persons.
     A. Re: Bikes
     B. Re: Gear
     C. Re: Services

2) How do you feel about camping alone?


Bikes: At most dealers I am virtually invisible. I have received great service from a couple also. I paid slightly more for a bike once because the salesman wouldn't put his cigarette and newspaper down . I went to another city and was treated like a valued customer so they got my business. They still have it too.

Gear: I'm lucky. The Honda/Suzuki shop in Johnson City, TN has a clothing department that is run by a lady that knows her stuff. Her prices are pretty close to internet prices but with the ability to try everything on for size. She will order any color or size for you if it isn't already in stock. Other than a pair of closeout Oxtars, all my gear came from Jim's Motorcycle Sales in Johnson City. :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

Service: The shop I use treats me well. The mechanics have been great about letting me watch and learn. I stay out of their way but tend to ask a few questions. The whole staff there treats me like a rider and not like a woman that rides. The owner knows that I ride more than 95% of his other customers. (My ex b/f went there to get tires once and I went with him. They politely nodded to him and tried to wait on me instead. :lol:)

Camping: I have camped solo many times. I try not to advertise that I am alone though. I sleep better in my tent than in a hotel. I am usually packing when travelling but have never felt threatened at all. When I rode the ST1100, most people assumed I had a fella around somewhere and I parked it with the passenger pegs down. Unless they someone saw me ride in solo, it never occurred to them that a woman was riding that bike.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs. DantesDame on November 06, 2008, 12:27:09 am

I have a couple of questions.

1) Tell me about your dealer experiences as related to how you felt treated by the sales persons.
     A. Re: Bikes
     B. Re: Gear
     C. Re: Services

2) How do you feel about camping alone?


1a) I've purchased only one bike new from a shop. It was a rather spontaneous transaction and I spent more time talking to two friends about than any sales people. In fact, I was only in the shop to have my current motorcycle looked over for the ride home; no one (including myself) was expecting me to buy anything  :o

1b) I bought my gear at either a local non-chain store in Seattle (with excellent service and selection) or online (ala my 'stitch)

1c) Bah. Service. I have myself, friends and a dedicated independent mechanic for the more difficult stuff.

2) I've camped alone and the only part of it that bothers me is wanting to be able to talk to someone after a long day in the saddle  :(


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jsanford on November 06, 2008, 02:19:15 am

1) Tell me about your dealer experiences as related to how you felt treated by the sales persons.
     A. Re: Bikes


I've bought two bikes from dealers.  One was long-planned, the other was sort of spontaneous, but not really--at the time, though, it felt VERY spontaneous and I surprised myself.

These experiences were fine, but I think it's because I knew what I wanted and what was going to happen with the paperwork.  It's odd--I didn't really need to "be sold" on anything, but any condescending or inequtable behavior would have killed a sale, no matter how much I wanted the bikes.  When I was a new rider, I encountered quite a bit of chauvenism in the shops.  Three of these dealerships sold Kawasakis, so I'm not inclined to consider them, probably ever.


     B. Re: Gear


I'm very lucky in this regard.  I'm tall but no Kate Moss, or Anna Nicole.  This means most mens' gear fits me.


     C. Re: Services


I've only ever had a customer service rep yank my chain once--he wasn't at the BMW dealership long, and I only saw him the one time. I left far more worried about whether he'd continue to work there, as I knew my bike would suffer, but I wasn't sure I was up to taking over the servicing.  It was a good lesson--there are only two BMW dealerships in this area, and they have a common owner.

The guys at the Duc dealership are great, as they genuinely love the bikes they work on.  My Monster is one of many service there, but always remembered as it was a problem bike when it was new. Some outside-the-service-manual thinking identified the problem.  Everyone always asks how the bike's running and if I've had any more runnability issues, and I love telling them no.


2) How do you feel about camping alone?


I've never done it, but plan to next year.  I've gone camping with other people I'd never met before, but always in an organized setting.  Nothing technical (stove, tent, packing, morning coffee) is unfamiliar, but I do worry about safety.

I don't consider myself necessarily friendly or outgoing--but curiousity has overcome this.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Shoganai on November 06, 2008, 06:37:45 am


2) I've camped alone and the only part of it that bothers me is wanting to be able to talk to someone after a long day in the saddle  :(


See my post on page 10.

The greatest part about camping or traveling alone is the vast opportunity to meet people on the road.

As a woman traveling alone, whether I was LD bicycling and on a motorcycle, people are never intimidated and are often curious. This make for fantastic human encounters. There is nothing greater in my book that the human road treasurers I find out there.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Virginian on November 06, 2008, 10:25:47 pm

Yes, of course, post her report pics or no.  Fer pete's sake, do you realize the kind of drivel we are willing to read here on STN?!? Naming no names, of course.  :D


And here is the link to her ride report. Sorry gals, I did the best I could do and so did she. I hope you enjoy it.  :o

Eric
https://www.sport-touring.net/forums/index.php/topic,32884.0.html


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs. DantesDame on November 06, 2008, 10:49:49 pm
Eric, neither you nor you mom have anything to apologize for. You both did a great job  :thumbsup:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: stromgal on November 06, 2008, 11:39:10 pm
Your mom is a wonderful writer. Thanks for bringing her memories to share with us. :thumbsup:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: LicketySplat on November 07, 2008, 08:34:00 am

I have a couple of questions.

1) Tell me about your dealer experiences as related to how you felt treated by the sales persons.
     A. Re: Bikes
     B. Re: Gear
     C. Re: Services

2) How do you feel about camping alone?


Bikes (and service, when it's beyond something I can do myself) - the shop I normally deal with is owned by a friend. So no problems there. My first bike was a different story, but I was clueless and happy to let male friends do the talking on the purchase, and on the machine shop work when we had to rebuild the freakin' Harley engine  :rolleyes:

Gear - My local guy is a small-town shop, does more dirt than road, so what he stocks that I could use is pretty minimal. (He is starting to carry a fair amount of MX gear in girls' and women's sizes though :).) I don't feel like I need any help from the shop when I buy gear, in any case. I'll research features and quality online, then find a place where I can try stuff on. As long as they have a changing room that isn't the same filthy restroom the male mechanics use, I'm happy  :cool:

Camping alone - haven't done it in over a decade, but when I was younger I took two solo trips on the bici and several on the moto. Got scared once or twice, never had a serious problem, LOVED the whole experience.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: ReynoldsFH439 on November 07, 2008, 09:20:55 am
I am really looking forward to camping alone... or camping, in general.  I don't know many people willing to do it.  The few who do, don't ride.  Once I get comfortable on a bike, I definitely want to take some solo camping trips...  I think it was riding pillion and the fresh air being forced into my nose at 60 mph that made me really miss camping.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jadziadax8 on November 07, 2008, 09:40:09 am
     A. Re: Bikes
I've only ever purchased one bike myself before.  I looked around at a lot of dealerships, and most salesman I talked to treated me with respect.  I sort of remember a couple of salesmen talking to Nate about my bike, but they didn't get our business mostly because they couldn't get me a good deal.  I don't put up with being talked around, and I think that because I'm 5'8" and ~200 lbs, I can be a little intimidating for a girl.
Anyway, I still give a big :thumbsup: to Brian, one of the Bs at B&B Kawasaki in Elgin, IL for treating me like any other customer.  I don't think he knew what to make of me when I called in to put my money down last February.  Nate had made the original call to the dealership, but I made all the subsequent calls about down payments, etc.  Maybe his first impression was that Nate was getting this for me, and I wasn't all that thrilled.  Boy did he learn.  It helps when you show up in full gear on a maxi-scooter with 20,000 miles, I guess.  Anyway, even though it's not the closest kwak dealership to me, whenever there is something wrong with one of our bikes that we don't know how to fix, we head over there.  Whenever we're there, Brian jokes about taking my bike in trade-in and selling me something else.  He's good people, and I always recommend his shop to people.

     B. Re: Gear
Mostly I order my gear online.  Most shops do not carry things in my size (14-18, depending on what piece I'm buying).  I was particularly frustrated when I went to a little shop downstate near my mom's house last fall.  I was trying to buy a good winter jacket, since my Cortech  jacket was a little short and let in a draft.   They sell Guzzi, Aprilia, Piaggio and Vespa.  They also sell Tourmaster and Olympia gear.  I was very impressed with the salesman.  He is a nice guy who loves bikes.  I was not impressed by the fact that they had no women's jackets in size XL (which is what I wear both for Olympia and Tourmaster).  Being told to try on a men's jacket when you are very curvy is a little insulting.  Then they tried to sell me some scooter gear out of Seattle that had no liner, even though I specifically said I was looking for gear that would allow me to ride in temps under 30 degrees.   :rolleyes:

     C. Re: Services
B&B Kawasaki has our vote for sure.  Tim, the head mechanic, is brilliant, listens to you when it comes to the bike's problems, and then works his magic.  

2) How do you feel about camping alone?
I don't.  Humans have spent millenia moving away from nature.  Why would I want to go back?


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: vtbandit on November 14, 2008, 07:42:03 pm
There is a great woman at a local motorcycle dearlership- she carries more women's gear than any place for a long way around.  There is another on-line (well.. and I went and visited as well) just over the line into MA that carries good women's gear and they are fabulous on the phone. Informed, helpful.. NO pressure at all to buy from them.

Ummm... while I'm chatting... how do I post one of those little map thingys showing the places I've traveled in my signature?  Found the map maker on line just don't know how to go about putting it on my profile.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs. DantesDame on November 14, 2008, 08:47:30 pm

There is a great woman at a local motorcycle dearlership- she carries more women's gear than any place for a long way around.  There is another on-line (well.. and I went and visited as well) just over the line into MA that carries good women's gear and they are fabulous on the phone. Informed, helpful.. NO pressure at all to buy from them.


"Local" to what? You don't have your location listed and while I can guess that you're in Vermont, that still doesn't tell me much. A store name might be helpful, too  :)

Ummm... while I'm chatting... how do I post one of those little map thingys showing the places I've traveled in my signature?  Found the map maker on line just don't know how to go about putting it on my profile.


Do a search in the "Members" thread  :thumbsup:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Weaselette on November 14, 2008, 10:11:39 pm


Then again, I snore loud enough that people probably think there's a 400 lb man in my tent. :lol:


We must be related  :lol:

I love m/c camping, though I haven't done it solo on the bike. Somehow I missed out this summer, partly because I screwed up my ankle big time the first day of our summer ride down the coast. I've too many good touring/camping memories to recollect 'em all, though one of my favourites was a KOA campground in western Minnesota during a thunderstorm: the owners were bikers and really threw out the welcome mat... to the point of telling us where to bail out if a tornado struck.  :eek:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: vtbandit on November 16, 2008, 09:36:01 am
In theory I love camping.  In fact, I do as well... On the road, a hot shower and a bed are pretty attractive at the end of the day - and in the morning when tent isn't all wet and cold.

Re: Excellent service for men and women (though it is harder to find places with a good selection of riding gear for women).  I was referring to Roadside Marine in Williston, VT.  Mary is superb, with incredible attention to detail when you ask a question. If you are in the area you'd be hard pressed to find a better Service Dept.  Called them on a trip when my husband had a problem with his FJR. Dan, Part/Service hero, dropped everything - got the manual and walked us through stuff.
http://www.roadsidemarine.com/default.asp

p.s. thanks for the tip on how to do the maps! ;)


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Redfox on December 08, 2008, 10:58:31 am
I usually have good experience at dealers and shops with a few notable exceptions. I love kicking tires and seeing what is new so Im a familar face at most of the local shops. My favorites are the Harley, BMW, Triumph and most recently, the dealer where I bought my Yammie.

My local mechanic is closing shop so tire and oil changes are now all done by me. (Scratch has two tire changing machines and one balancer as well as an air compressor and big chain breaker.) I enjoy wrenching so it works out well. I think last year we went through six sets of tires.

I'm pretty tall and will buy gear online when I'm sure of the size and fit. Otherwise I really have to try it on and sit on a bike. I feel that if a shop takes the time and expense to stock things for me to try on I will buy it from them rather than figure out my size and then buy it online.

I used to ride alone a lot and camped to save money. Now days I really like the warm soft bed and instant hot shower. I do not miss folding cleaning and stowing a dew covered tent or the clanging of the cooking and fire gear on the muffler. I do miss the good conversation with other riders over a wood fire.
Camping was a whole other thing added to my riding day. When making distance the extra gear was a lot of extra work when I wanted to chill and really slowed me down when I wanted to hustle. I would consider camping again if I was riding to an area to go riding for a few days and didnt have to make and break camp every day or if I was intent on reducing cost.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: steveindenmark on December 23, 2008, 02:22:18 am
Hi ladies,

I am not invading your space but I have a lady friend in Russia who was asking me about bikes, learning to ride etc so I have passed on your section to her so she can come and ask you herself. I am sure you will be able to keep her straight if she turns up.

I saw that you have been talking about BUFFS. I use them all the time even when I am not on the bike.  I have just bought a fleece lined winter one which is great, nice and warm.

I even make my own buffs now. Before you start thinking I play for the other side....I don`t  ;)

I make sails for a living so am used to sewing machines...it must be the feminine side in me....Making buffs is simple and takes all of 2 minutes. The only problem is finding the stretchy material. But you are sure to know where you can but fabric from so go and ask them.

Here is the buffs link   http://www.buffwear.co.uk/

I have just bought a really good electric shaver but perhaps I will save that for another day  :lol:

MERRY CHRISTMAS LADIES  :beerchug:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs. DantesDame on December 28, 2008, 04:42:04 pm
Hi Steve!

I know all about Buffs - I think they're great! Thanks for steering your Russian friend this way  :thumbsup: :thumbsup:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs.BMW-K on January 24, 2009, 11:38:03 pm
Help!

I'm going on a long road trip this summer, and I'm pretty sure I'll be in some locations where there will be no bathrooms, and no "cover" to hide behind in case I need to pee.  Then there is also the issue of getting the gear off, just to have a squat - ugh!

Have any of you used special "cups" that let you pee standing up???   :headscratch:  Do these things actually work?



Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: R6Chick on January 24, 2009, 11:45:47 pm

Help!

I'm going on a long road trip this summer, and I'm pretty sure I'll be in some locations where there will be no bathrooms, and no "cover" to hide behind in case I need to pee.  Then there is also the issue of getting the gear off, just to have a squat - ugh!

Have any of you used special "cups" that let you pee standing up???   :headscratch:  Do these things actually work?




I have no personal experience but have spoken with a woman who has. She said it takes some practice and you still have to get out of the bulk of your gear. You will still be looking for some cover as your butt will still be 'in the wind' as it were. Based on her review I determined it was not worth the effort. I already know how to squat on the side of the road without getting any on me or my feet and have no desire to piss all over myself until I get it right.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs.BMW-K on January 25, 2009, 12:08:46 am
The only problem is that there will be no cover - at all - not even a shrub so I'm hoping to find a reasonable solution that won't leave my "bum" in the wind, especially as I'll be in mixed company too!


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: R6Chick on January 25, 2009, 12:12:05 am

The only problem is that there will be no cover - at all - not even a shrub so I'm hoping to find a reasonable solution that won't leave my "bum" in the wind, especially as I'll be in mixed company too!


In such situations I have found a trusted man and a large beach towel supply sufficient coverage unless there is a big wind. In the wind situation several good, trusted, men in a half circle facing out can often supply decent cover. Assuming the men can suspend their more childish instincts during the time you need them too. I know some guys I would not travel with simply because they cannot suppress the inner 7th grader in them.



Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs. DantesDame on January 25, 2009, 12:42:32 am

The only problem is that there will be no cover - at all - not even a shrub so I'm hoping to find a reasonable solution that won't leave my "bum" in the wind, especially as I'll be in mixed company too!


Considering that there will be almost no cover (or "none" whatsoever), then what are the odds that anyone will come by? And if they do come by, what are the odds that they would even care? I've seen guys pissing at the side of the road and just shrug. It's something that has to be done, no matter who you are (or where you are).



Ooo - I just noticed the "mixed company" note, and I assume you're not just referring to Robert. Hmmm - well, how well do you know these guys?  :D


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: atypical1 on January 25, 2009, 12:48:25 am
Hey Trina,

Missy tried those cones at Burning Man and didn't like them at all. There is a big learning curve to them and YMMV.

OTOH, if you just tell the guys to turn their heads I'm sure they will. And it's not like you won't be able to see an oncoming car from kilometers and kilometers away  :lol:

james


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jsanford on January 25, 2009, 05:32:52 pm

Hey Trina,

Missy tried those cones at Burning Man and didn't like them at all. There is a big learning curve to them and YMMV.

OTOH, if you just tell the guys to turn their heads I'm sure they will. And it's not like you won't be able to see an oncoming car from kilometers and kilometers away  :lol:

james


+1.

I guess I lost all sense of modesty about those things when I was bicycle racing.  It wasn't that uncommon to see guys go back to their cars after the TT, open a door, and then peel off their skinsuits out there in God and Country.

IME in mixed company, most men would be more embarrassed if they got caught having a peek--there isn't really much come-hither about whizzing by the side of the road.  I'd be prepared to tease anyone mercilessly.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: R6Chick on January 25, 2009, 06:36:48 pm

-there isn't really much come-hither about whizzing by the side of the road.


There is an entire flourishing fetish market regarding just this topic. There are a lot of closet kinks out there who most certainly would not be letting any of us in on it.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs. DantesDame on January 25, 2009, 06:56:24 pm
In that case, I say let them get their jollies as long as I can pee in peace :shrug:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: R6Chick on January 25, 2009, 07:03:40 pm

In that case, I say let them get their jollies as long as I can pee in peace :shrug:


Exactly! If I am not aware of your looking than I say no harm, no foul.   :D :lol:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Tyler on January 29, 2009, 01:25:14 pm
Timely thread to stumble upon! :)  I'm doing an informal poll to find out where women riders get motorcycle related info We are contemplating some marketing/advertising for my women's touring company (www.northstarmototours.com) and I'm researching where some good places might be to be seen. ;)

Magazines? RoadRunner, Rider, etc.
Websites?  US based or European
Club membership/s?
Web rings?
Online forums?

If yes to any of the above, which one/s?  Thanks in advance!! :)

(*goes back to peruse the previous 12 pages or so of women rider related chit chat!* ;) )


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs.BMW-K on February 01, 2009, 10:28:47 pm
Thanks for all the input.  I'm going with VERY trustworthy people - and that includes my husband  :lol: - it's just a shyness thing for me, so I guess I'll either have to put in alot of practice between now and the trip or, just get over it.  James - thanks for sharing Missy's experience.  Somehow knowing the woman who has tried it helps me put it in perspective.

I love that I can come here to ask these questions!


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: bluepoof on February 01, 2009, 11:40:53 pm
How'd I miss the pee topic? :lol:

I've been using a Freshette for riding and camping for about a year.  It does take a little bit of practice (+1 on not peeing into the wind!!) but once you get used to it, it's a godsend, IMHO.

The only trick is to make sure you're holding it tightly up against the bits and then pee as hard as you can, otherwise some might dribble out of the top of the cup and down your leg.  If you can pull your pants down just a little bit (not enough to bare your butt, but just enough to get some room in the crotch), it helps a lot.

If you practice at home a few times, you'll get the hang of it quickly.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs. DantesDame on February 01, 2009, 11:45:07 pm
Yeah, but the point for me is not to have to undo the pants at all. I want to stick it out there like the guys do and water the tree  :lol:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Black Ice on February 01, 2009, 11:54:02 pm

It does take a little bit of practice (+1 on not peeing into the wind!!)

otherwise some might dribble down your leg.


These are things that happen to guys as well.  Don't be thinking we have it made 100%, ladies.   :crazy:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs.BMW-K on February 02, 2009, 11:12:57 pm
Poof!!!!  This is very good to know!  Where do you buy it?


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Stargzrgrl on February 03, 2009, 01:23:12 am
Um, Trina?  

Are you SURE you want to go on a trip with Robert and company after their latest "We're Not Smart" misadventure?  :crazy:

 :p


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: bluepoof on February 03, 2009, 12:58:07 pm

Poof!!!!  This is very good to know!  Where do you buy it?


I got mine at REI.   :inlove:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: KenC on February 03, 2009, 04:39:17 pm
What ARE you ladies talking about?  :lol:

On the topic of women riders, I'd like to point you to my new book. Yes, it's shameless promotion, but it is also to show off my lovely wife and daughter who are both accomplished motorcyclists. My wife, Caroline, is the rider in the main photo on the cover. My 18 yo daughter, Jeannine, appears several times inside the book and is a significant part of the Accompanying DVD.

I'm one lucky guy. We take all of our family trips together (now on 3 bikes) and attend several track days a year.
Check out the photo gallery and some video clips at the web site. http://www.ridinginthezone.com.

Carry on with whatever you're talking about.  :crazy:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: cultureslayer on February 03, 2009, 11:29:25 pm
Who wants to bet he gets more PMs about the 18yo daughter than the book?  :lol:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs.BMW-K on February 04, 2009, 02:28:17 pm
Yosh!!!  Gee...  I missed all the fun! :p  I was supposed to be on that trip, but God smiled on me and gave me a nasty head cold, which sounds way better then what they went through  :lol: especially as I'm such a coward!

I'm thinking the next time (and there will be) they decide on one of these I should follow in a support truck - Long Way Round-esk!


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs.BMW-K on February 04, 2009, 02:29:20 pm
Darn Poof... I was just at REI on Monday and didn't even think to look for them!  Guess that means I need to go back - woohoo!!!!!!!!!

REI = crack


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: atypical1 on February 04, 2009, 02:34:52 pm

I'm thinking the next time (and there will be) they decide on one of these I should follow in a support truck - Long Way Round-esk!


No, next time we decide on one of those rides I'll just take my truck  :lol:

james


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Klondike on February 04, 2009, 08:16:21 pm
Have any of you lady campers found  www.motocampers.com yet?  Lots of good info there.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: bluepoof on February 04, 2009, 08:29:30 pm

Have any of you lady campers found  www.motocampers.com yet?  Lots of good info there.


Yep, I'm a member there! It's great stuff. :inlove:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs.BMW-K on February 06, 2009, 12:10:13 am
Hey James,

I'll let you borrow my bike next time, and I'll drive your truck!   :lol:



Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: atypical1 on February 06, 2009, 10:10:39 am

Hey James,

I'll let you borrow my bike next time, and I'll drive your truck!   :lol:




 :lol:

No, I think I'll be the one driving...you need the practice for Alaska!  :p

james


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs.BMW-K on February 06, 2009, 11:57:13 am
Damn...  I hate it when you're right!   :)


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: demenshea on February 13, 2009, 04:11:27 pm
Hello,
I am not sure what sort of pool of knowledge i can contribute, ;) however, I wanted to take this opportunity to introduce myself.  I have been lurking on STN for quite some time, and last year met some of you at the STN gathering in John Day. I have crossed forum paths with Bluepoof on several occasions, and last year was fortunate enough to meet her in person in Austin, NV.

I am a still a newbie, having ridden only 4.5 years now, but I have grown through 4 bikes and covered 75K in mileage,which for many of you is simply traversing the country a few times!  I look longingly at your posted maps with all the places visited and aspire to filling in my map as well.

My home forum has always been pashnit, and I love the motor roads site, but I am striving to "get out" more this year. :lol: Did a solo trip 2 years ago over seven states and two Canadian provinces, and hope to repeat some of it this summer.  Absolutely loved the country around Nelson, BC.  I mostly stick to the road less traveled avoiding the larger cities.  I'm not afraid of goat/dirt, but find my loaded Bandit not quite suited for many of the roads i attempt exploring!  :lol:  Maybe time for bike number 5.

Hope to see many of you out on the road.  I always love seeing a helmet pulled off with a female rider underneath!   :thumbsup:  


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: bluepoof on February 13, 2009, 05:13:57 pm

 I have crossed forum paths with Bluepoof on several occasions, and last year was fortunate enough to meet her in person in Austin, NV.


That was so funny! :lol: Peter couldn't believe that we just randomly bumped into someone I knew online at a gas station in the middle of nowhere. ;)


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: atypical1 on February 13, 2009, 07:21:22 pm

I am a still a newbie, having ridden only 4.5 years now, but I have grown through 4 bikes and covered 75K in mileage,which for many of you is simply traversing the country a few times!  I look longingly at your posted maps with all the places visited and aspire to filling in my map as well.


Holy crap! That's very impressive mileage for someone just getting into the sport! Welcome and enjoy your stay.

james


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: demenshea on February 13, 2009, 09:46:14 pm



That was so funny! :lol: Peter couldn't believe that we just randomly bumped into someone I knew online at a gas station in the middle of nowhere. ;)


Hey Carolyn!  That was just crazy wasn't it??  Tis how it works in the most unlikely of places!  ;)  Say hello to Peter!


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: demenshea on February 13, 2009, 09:47:24 pm



Holy crap! That's very impressive mileage for someone just getting into the sport! Welcome and enjoy your stay.

james


what can i say...bitten by the motobug and thanks for the welcome!


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: lionlady on February 17, 2009, 05:28:10 pm

Hope to see many of you out on the road.  I always love seeing a helmet pulled off with a female rider underneath!   :thumbsup:  


Hi, Donna!!! (I think, with the miles you've logged, you're certainly no longer to be called a "newbie")

Pam


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: demenshea on March 19, 2009, 09:09:05 pm



Hi, Donna!!! (I think, with the miles you've logged, you're certainly no longer to be called a "newbie")

Pam


I believe that mileage has a definite contribution to skill, but I am always learning! ;)



Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jsanford on March 20, 2009, 05:16:48 pm

Just a grouse:

Recently I realized that my leather pants are uncomfortably too big.  Last night I went to a shop to get new ones as they carry Dianese, which IME run longer in the sleeves and legs in women's styles.

I told the apparel guy what size I was and his silly chart mapped it to FOUR sizes lower than my reality. Fortunately he had those in stock, and indeed the leg-length fit well--better than my old Hein Gericke pair, in fact.

I guess Italian women who ride motorcycles aren't allowed to weigh more than 150...  :headscratch:

Other than that, they are great pants for the longer-legged.  :thumbsup:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: shesmyjewel on April 07, 2009, 12:17:56 pm
Wow. Look what I found.
13 pages of S-T women.
Love this new forum. Hehe.

Sexism aside, I love to see women riders out there.
There's more today than ever before and I think it's great.
My GF has a small bike, trying to convince her to get a larger one
more suited for long runs and carrying loads so we can hit the roads together
and travel/camp comfortably.

Ride safe girls!!



Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Condolini on April 13, 2009, 10:00:08 am
I've found that being bigger and taller than the typical woman has resulted in the guys treating me like one of the guys.  Guess "Fat is a Feminist Issue" was right.  I learn my maintenance tricks from the guys who are much more adventuresome about taking things apart than I am.  I don't change tires or take off the wheels because I don't have the tools.  I'm good at changing oil and lubing chains.

Gear can be problematic, finally found some that fits so I'm sticking with it.  Bought a used 'stich, it's snug in the hips without being linebacker big thru the shoulders.  Most of my gear comes from newenough.com

Almost all of my riding and camping is done solo.  12,000+ miles and 15 states last year.  Not being a girly-girl I don't worry about shaving, hair (it's short) and monthly "visits".  Part of it is because I'm old, part is because I don't care that much.  :lol:  I'm trying to emulate Ardys Kellerman, she doesn't seem to be too concerned with her hairstyle and makeup while she's riding.

Ride on ladies, don't let being born female stand in the way of your dreams and goals!  


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: LicketySplat on May 09, 2009, 01:52:56 pm

I guess Italian women who ride motorcycles aren't allowed to weigh more than 150...  :headscratch:


You must never have been to Italy.

Italian women are not allowed to weigh more than 150, motorcycles or not.

If they weigh over 120, they are required to be at least 5'7".


Title: Re: Cramps/PMS
Post by: Mostrogirl on May 16, 2009, 12:21:05 am

I admit I use to take Ibuprofen and all it's alternatives before I found out how damaging they are to your liver.  My liver was in bad enough shape with all the drinking I did long ago, so decided to find out why we get cramps and all of those other miserable symptoms!  

One quick answer:  nutritional deficiency.  Sure enough, supplementing my diet with some vitamins and minerals whisked those cramps away.  The most important ones are

B-6. Vitamin B6 is critical to maintaining hormonal balance.  In most situations, the therapeutic dosage of 50 to 100 mg per day is generally regarded as safe, even for long-term use.

Magnesium which is considered the "antistress" mineral. It is a natural tranquilizer, as it functions to relax skeletal muscles as well as the smooth muscles of blood vessels and the gastrointestinal tract.  As magnesium plays such an integral part in normal cell function, magnesium deficiency may account for the wide range of symptoms attributed to PMS.  The recommended range of magnesium is 300 to 450 mg daily.

Calcium supplementation has produced significant improvements in PMS symptoms in double-blind studies.  It has been found that women with PMS have reduced bone mineral density. The recommended dosage for calcium in PMS is 1,000 to 1,500 mg daily.

(If you take high amounts of calcium daily, you may have a magnesium deficiency. Most experts suggest that your calcium: magnesium ration should be 2:1. In other words, if you take 1500 mg of calcium daily through diet and supplementation, you should try to consume at least 750 mg of magnesium daily as well. this may help prevent an imbalance from occurring. Magnesium and calcium supplements should be taken at different times to allow for better absorption of each of these minerals.)

Zinc levels have been shown to be lower in women who have PMS. Zinc is required for proper action of many body hormones, including sex hormones, as well as in the control of the secretion of hormones. The suggested range for zinc supplementation is 15 to 20 mg.

There are also some important dietary factors you should take into consideration as well.
Reduce or eliminate the amount of animal products in the diet, and increase consumption of fiber-rich plant foods, including fruits, vegetables, grains, and legumes).

Considerable evidence suggests that caffeine consumption is strongly related to the presence and severity of PMS. Therefore, caffeine must also be avoided by women with PMS. The effect of caffeine is particularly significant in the psychological symptoms associated with PMS, such as anxiety, irritability, insomnia, and depression. If breast tenderness and fibrocystic breast disease are the major symptoms as caffeine has an adverse effect on the way estrogen stimulates breast tissue.

There is also evidence phytoestrogens may exert a balancing effect when estrogen levels are high as is commonly seen in the premenstrual syndrome (PMS). The consumption of soy foods is the most economical, and possibly the most beneficial, way to increase the intake of phytoestrogens. Vitamin B6 also has an affect on the metabolism of estrogen. Vitamin B 6 is high in yams, leafy green vegetables and legumes.

Excessive salt consumption, coupled with diminished dietary potassium, greatly stresses the kidneys' ability to maintain proper fluid volume. As a result some people are "salt-sensitive," in that high salt intake causes high blood pressure or, in other cases, water retention. In general, it is a good idea to avoid salt if you have PMS. If you tend to notice more water retention during the latter part of your menstrual cycle, reducing your salt intake is an absolute must.

Now, I'm off to order that Diva Cup!!  Yee Ha!!!
:bigok: Right on!!!


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: cultureslayer on May 16, 2009, 12:54:49 am
Just make sure that if you take magnesium you don't waste your money on the oxide form, since it's very poorly absorbed (and thus more likely to upset your stomach as well).  I'm taking citrate right now and have some aspartate on order to see if it works better.  I've also ordered some NOW full spectrum minerals to try.  I'd been taking only calcium for so long I'd given myself a pretty bad magnesium deficiency, so for now I've quit taking calcium and I'm taking as much magnesium as my stomach can stand (600mg  day).


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs.BMW-K on July 22, 2009, 08:30:03 pm
Well Ladies, I'm on my Alaska adventure, and have used the Freshette, and the Diva Cup, and I can give them both a huge thumbs up.  Thanks for the advice, and I'm passing the knowledge on to other women I've been meeting, especially the one girl I spoke to today who got a mosquito bite on her bottom from squatting in the weeds.   :lol:

The Freshette takes a bit of practice, but it's been so nice to not have to squat on the side of the road.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: bluepoof on July 22, 2009, 11:01:46 pm
Woo Freshette! Woo Diva Cup!   :inlove: :inlove: :inlove:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Sarchi on September 27, 2009, 09:39:35 pm
I haven't read the whole thread, sorry...but can anyone recommend a shop with a good selection of women's apparel that's located somewhere along the I-75 corridor between Detroit and Lexington?

thanks--


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: vtbandit on November 19, 2009, 06:52:19 am
I am looking forward to going to Prudhoe Bay in 2011.  It will be about 8000 miles of paved road and a few hundred miles of dirt / mud / slime etc...  Have a street bike I love, but am looking at a dual purpose for this trip. Leaning toward the KLR 650 - apparently bullet proof.  I'm 5'4" - and can barely touch. Has anyone with height issues ridden dual purpose? used the lowering kit? have advice distance on a dual purpose?


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs. DantesDame on November 19, 2009, 09:48:43 am

I am looking forward to going to Prudhoe Bay in 2011.  It will be about 8000 miles of paved road and a few hundred miles of dirt / mud / slime etc...  Have a street bike I love, but am looking at a dual purpose for this trip. Leaning toward the KLR 650 - apparently bullet proof.  I'm 5'4" - and can barely touch. Has anyone with height issues ridden dual purpose? used the lowering kit? have advice distance on a dual purpose?


Wooo - enjoy the trip! I took my KLR there in (gasp  :crazy: ) 2004.

Personally, I think this post could have been put to the General Discussion, as there are short guys out there as well. However, since you put it here, I'll answer it here. Bluepoof borrowed a friend's KLR for a little single track adventure near Seattle with me. He put on lowering links for her and dropped the front. She's about... god, I don't even know how short she is  :o  Regardless, she made it work.

I don't have experience with other KLR-like bikes, so I can's suggest something else (like the KLX450 - it looks awesome but it may not have the range). Anyway, best of luck!

(http://www.dantesdame.com/07tahuya/12-campground.jpg)

That's Blue on the left, me on the right. I'm about 6', so I'll let you guess her height. She rode the blue KLR...


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: bluepoof on November 19, 2009, 11:36:16 am
I've been invoked!  :bigok:

I'm 5'1" and wear Daytona Ladystar boots with a rise in them which make me a towering almost-5'3".   :lol:

Once you get used to it, you should have no trouble with a KLR.  I there were 3" lowering links on the KLR I borrowed.  I did drop it once (in my defense it was in silty sandy muck) but it really wasn't any harder to ride than my F650GS.

As for dualsporting in general when you're wee, it's pretty similar to riding street -- you just have to be extra careful where you stop to put a foot down. :lol:  Also, it's definitely doable to ride distance on a dualsport -- I've never done it on a KLR, but I rode my F650GS around the country last summer and my husband did 2/3 of the country on a DRZ400.  

Anyway, have fun!  :inlove: :inlove: :inlove:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: theWolfTamer on November 20, 2009, 09:02:38 pm
I am thinking of doing something similar.  I want to spend a summer touring the country, either this one coming or the next.  I haven't made up my mind about Prudhoe but was tempted when I read this (http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=465713) thread on ADVrider.  He did it on a cruiser.  I have an FZ1.  I think I will just get different tires (http://www.canyonchasers.net/reviews/tires/d616vSync.php) if I decide to do it rather than getting a whole 'nother bike for the trip.

I'm looking into the Ladyster boots too.  I'm 5'3 and it'd be nice to have an inch or two more.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: GoGreen on December 13, 2009, 10:39:46 pm
Hello ladies! In regards to messed up hair, check out this site: http://stylesaverscarf.com/ I wear one of these and it keeps your hair from getting really tangled up, keeps your helmet clean inside, too! :D


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: geargirl on December 26, 2009, 09:57:07 pm
Great never-talked about anywhere info!  Been on trips w.husb and friends where I needed to stop every 2 hours.  Tag-teamed pee stops w.husb  to make sure I was where I needed to be at the right time!  Great topics!


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: stefrrr on January 04, 2010, 05:09:43 pm
Have any of you tried the Warm n Safe Touring gloves or Gerbing T5s? I was pretty sold on the T5s, but a few have mentioned the Warm n safes. I like the thought of the carbon fiber on the Warm n safes, but sometimes the carbon fiber doesn't sit on my knuckles right. Thoughts? Other suggestions?


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: stromgal on January 04, 2010, 07:54:53 pm

Have any of you tried the Warm n Safe Touring gloves or Gerbing T5s? I was pretty sold on the T5s, but a few have mentioned the Warm n safes. I like the thought of the carbon fiber on the Warm n safes, but sometimes the carbon fiber doesn't sit on my knuckles right. Thoughts? Other suggestions?


I have the previous-gen Gerbing gloves. They're a bit on the bulky side, and I considered buying the newer/thinner version, but then read some folks saying they aren't as warm. Since I live on the Frozen Tundra, I decided more warm is better than less bulk :lol: YHeatedGloveMV.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: GoGreen on January 04, 2010, 11:02:26 pm
I get cold hands very easily, just bought warm'n'safe this year, both the full liner and gloves. Excellent product, the gloves especially are awesome, I don't have to trun them up very much to keep me toasty, and that is saying something! Also I found that they are not at all bulky, and have a very effective visor wiper on the left glove, plus they are waterproof. A wise investment, I would buy them again.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: stefrrr on January 04, 2010, 11:20:06 pm
Warm'n'safe is starting to sound good - a bunch of people are recommending those. How does the jacket fit?


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: GoGreen on January 04, 2010, 11:41:13 pm
The liner should (and does on me) fit quite snug, fairly close to your body without being tight and restrictive. All you want to wear under it is a long sleeve shirt or long sleeve underwear. Over it I put on a windshirt ( this is a light-weight zip up that completely blocks wind) I take out the liner that goes in my armoured jacket (you won't need it) and I have the perfect combination! You can modify this depending on how cold it is. Remember, if you are going to layer anything else, wear it over the liner, to keep the heat in. Just one layer under it, but this is also a must since you don't want to risk burning yourself! Be sure to get the gear with a temperature controller, it's called a heat troller, and a must have to be able to adjust the heat to suit your needs. I have never needed to turn it all the way up, that's how hot they can get!


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: stefrrr on January 04, 2010, 11:49:05 pm
Thanks for all the info! I was wishing I had a windshirt on my cold ride on Sunday. Good to know that'll work. I was using a wind/rain liner from another jacket that's too big. Are you using it under textile or mesh?

Which gloves did you go with? If you got the ones with carbon fiber, where does the carbon fiber sit on your hands?


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: katego on January 05, 2010, 01:42:48 am

Thanks for all the info! I was wishing I had a windshirt on my cold ride on Sunday. Good to know that'll work. I was using a wind/rain liner from another jacket that's too big. Are you using it under textile or mesh?

Which gloves did you go with? If you got the ones with carbon fiber, where does the carbon fiber sit on your hands?


I used to wear my gerbings liner under a kilimanjaro air (part-mesh) shell; not warm enough. I would end up with the outer jacket, a water/wind proof shell, then the gerbing liner. very annoying to mess around with 3 zippered layers. I just replaced the first gear jacket with a darien light and so now i am down to 2 layers and don't need the electrics on very often; so far i am pretty happy.

-k

-k


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: GoGreen on January 05, 2010, 09:36:34 pm
Hi stefrrr! I use my liner and wind shirt under a textile jacket by Joe Rocket, it has a bit more room than my leather/mesh jacket, although I am sure it would fit. My textile is better for cold rides. The gloves I got are I think the ultimate touring gloves, and yes they have the carbon fiber. The carbon fiber sits over your knuckles, giving a strong protective barrier, and in my opinion one can not be too protected. If it helps you out at all, my hubby did a ton of research on heated gear before we decided to go with warm and safe. They are a good company to deal with and will answer any questions or concerns that you may have about their product.
Hope this will help with your decision! :D


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: stefrrr on January 05, 2010, 09:38:57 pm
Thanks! I'm pretty sold now.  :) I like the carbon fiber knuckle guards when they fit right. Glad to hear they made them right.

I just with I could get them here in time for Sunday.  :lol:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: 98VFRgal on January 09, 2010, 01:10:02 pm
Thought I'd say hi after lurking for awhile.

I am 5'2" with a short inseam. About a size 12/14.  I started riding on the street the day after my 47th birthday. Now 2 years later, I'm on my 4th bike (no, I haven't wrecked any of them). I started out on a Ninja 250 (wedding present), moved up to a Ninja 650R within a couple of months. My husband, who's been riding for 40 years and has owned over 55 bikes in that time....bought one of his favorite bikes, a 98 VFR800. I 'test' rode it for a couple of miles and was hooked! I told him he needed to find another one ASAP. He did and at one point we even had 3 in the driveway! Of those 3, we still have 1 of them, the one I ride --- a 1998 with Y2K Yellow body. One of the others was totaled in April 09 when a cager ran down my husband at a stoplight. The 3rd we sold to a guy in town, who is now our friend. Now we own 2 more...a 98 Red and a 02 Red. We love VFRs! I've decided to sell my yellow one and take over my husband's Red 98 (less miles) while he will ride the 02. We also recently picked up a 2006 Ninja 650R (the same as my 2nd bike).

In August of 2009 we took a 10 day / 3,060 mile journey up the coast of California, Oregon & Washington, then East and home via the "middle" of those states. Our goal was no "FREEWAY"S...and until we were back in the Greater Bay Area...we were able to stay on back roads. It was a blast!

I ride with my husband and my girlfriend of 35 years (she's been riding since she was 10 (dirt) and did the "end of the road" in Alaska on her BMW 650 a few years ago)....she's my mentor. She and my husband encouraged me to learn to ride and I'm thrilled they did!

Though I haven't been able to flat foot any of my bikes since my 250...I can get the ball of my foot down by having my seats carved out. I've had a couple of custom Corbin's that really helped!

I saw some posting recommendations for peeing aides. Have you heard of go-girl.com? I'm going to give their product a try. I also ride dirt and this would be really helpful!

I didn't mean to ramble....have a fabulous day!

Lynn


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs. DantesDame on January 09, 2010, 03:38:46 pm

Thought I'd say hi after lurking for awhile.


 :wave:  Welcome to the club!



In August of 2009 we took a 10 day / 3,060 mile journey up the coast of California, Oregon & Washington, then East and home via the "middle" of those states. Our goal was no "FREEWAY"S...and until we were back in the Greater Bay Area...we were able to stay on back roads. It was a blast!


You can't go wrong in that area of the country. I don't think there's a single non-freeway road on the west coast that sucks  :cool:



Though I haven't been able to flat foot any of my bikes since my 250...I can get the ball of my foot down by having my seats carved out. I've had a couple of custom Corbin's that really helped!


Check bluepoof's blogs - she had custom boots made that give her a couple of inches (and she needed them  :lol: ) She swears by them and it has helped her comfortably ride an array of "taller" motorcycles.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: stefrrr on January 09, 2010, 03:43:36 pm
Welcome, 98vfrgal!  :) four bikes in two years? You'll fit right in here. ;)


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: bluepoof on January 09, 2010, 03:53:51 pm

Check bluepoof's blogs - she had custom boots made that give her a couple of inches (and she needed them  :lol: ) She swears by them and it has helped her comfortably ride an array of "taller" motorcycles.


The boots are actually stock Daytona Ladystars.  :inlove:  They ROCK!!

I'm 5'1" barefoot and am almost a towering 5'3" in the boots.  They're comfortable, waterproof, look nice...and over an extra inch oh height, woo!

http://www.helimot.com/shopexd.asp?id=73

(http://www.helimot.com/images/boots/Lady%20Star%20GTX%20230.jpg)

They're expensive but they're worth it and they last forever.  I had my first pair from July 2002 until January 2008: over 75,000 miles.  I replaced them with the exact same model because I had gotten a tiny hole in the toe and they were no longer waterproof.

Oh, and welcome!  :bigok:  I've never flatfoot a single bike I've ever owned, so I hear ya there!

Never tried a Go Girl but I LOVE my Freshette.   :lol:  Looks like the same basic idea.  :inlove:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: stromgal on January 09, 2010, 10:42:58 pm
Hey, flat-footiing a bike is over-rated, anyway.  :D  Welcome!


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: 98VFRgal on January 10, 2010, 12:52:09 am
Thanks for the welcomes! I actually have met Helimot & his lady at a popular bike place near my home just a couple of months ago! Cool! I'll check them out! Thanks!


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: bluepoof on January 10, 2010, 02:03:40 am
Helmut and Linda are awesome.  :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup:  Don't ever go to the store if you're in a hurry though...they'll start you talking and next thing you know, it's three hours later. :lol:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: theWolfTamer on January 18, 2010, 10:28:09 pm
Jacket deal too good to miss:

Firstgear Womens Monarch Jacket (http://www.motorcycle-superstore.com/1/2/49/10875/ITEM/Firstgear-Womens-Monarch-Jacket.aspx)  @ about 80% off reg price, I couldn't pass on it.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: dgshaffer on February 05, 2010, 07:03:30 am

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wx_ui2qWgqI



Thanks for the link, that was fantastic!


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jadziadax8 on April 05, 2010, 12:34:33 pm
This is way harder than I expected it to be.

I'm 37 weeks pregnant, can't fit in my gear/on the bike any more and the weather is gorgeous.

No riding = :thumbsdown:

Sorry, thought I'd whine a bit to some folks who'd understand.  I hope y'all are enjoying the nice weather.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs. DantesDame on April 05, 2010, 05:38:52 pm

Sorry, thought I'd whine a bit to some folks who'd understand.  I hope y'all are enjoying the nice weather.


Whine away!!!  :bigok:  And yes, I've been getting some great riding in  :cool:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jadziadax8 on April 05, 2010, 05:56:21 pm

And yes, I've been getting some great riding in  :cool:


 :fitz:

 :lol:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: bluepoof on April 05, 2010, 07:20:32 pm
I'm not pregnant but I can definitely relate to not riding in gorgeous spring weather because of uncomfortable physical ailments! :lol:

It does frickin' suck.  


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Stargzrgrl on April 05, 2010, 07:39:25 pm

This is way harder than I expected it to be.

I'm 37 weeks pregnant, can't fit in my gear/on the bike any more and the weather is gorgeous.

No riding = :thumbsdown:

Sorry, thought I'd whine a bit to some folks who'd understand.  I hope y'all are enjoying the nice weather.


Should have kept the Burgman!  At least you could still reach the handlebars...  I think.  :D

I think I was about 5 months preggers when I could no longer reach the handle bars and my belly hit the tank.   :lol:

Sorry I'm no help other than that may still I have some kids gear I can give you when your sprout's big enough.   :bigok:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: cultureslayer on April 06, 2010, 08:01:05 am



Whine away!!!  :bigok:  And yes, I've been getting some great riding in  :cool:

+1 it almost killed me this weekend when I had the carbs apart and couldn't ride.  


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jadziadax8 on April 06, 2010, 08:55:57 am

Should have kept the Burgman!  At least you could still reach the handlebars...  I think.  :D


Well, if big fat dudes an ride Harleys, I don't suppose why not!


Sorry I'm no help other than that may still I have some kids gear I can give you when your sprout's big enough.   :bigok:


Sweet!  I will definitely take you up on that offer.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Crackedpot on May 24, 2010, 08:27:58 pm



Should have kept the Burgman!  At least you could still reach the handlebars...  I think.  :D

I think I was about 5 months preggers when I could no longer reach the handle bars and my belly hit the tank.   :lol:

Sorry I'm no help other than that may still I have some kids gear I can give you when your sprout's big enough.   :bigok:


Sorry to do more than lurk, ladies! I have a 12-year-old daughter and small 14-year-old son (smaller than his sister) wearing petite ladies wear; my son looks cute with the little roses on the jacket! Is there somewhere to get kid's street gear, or should I stick with small ladies gear that's a bit too big?


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs. DantesDame on May 25, 2010, 12:45:09 pm
There doesn't appear to be much out there for kids other than dirt bike stuff. I did find this site (http://www.bikersden.com/shop/shopdisplayproducts.asp?id=24), however... :shrug:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: stefrrr on May 25, 2010, 03:21:03 pm
I would post up in General Discussion - I know a lot of people on here have kids who they have bought gear for...


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Crackedpot on May 27, 2010, 04:50:03 pm
Thanks... not sure I could get my son to wear chaps! Yeah, not much in armored textile wear. Oh well, the roses are tiny!


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Stargzrgrl on May 27, 2010, 09:44:32 pm
Try New Enough for kid's gear.  Their selection is still small but they are starting to get more items like this:

http://www.newenough.com/street/protective_apparel/textile_jackets_and_pants/tour_master/youth_jett_series_2_textile_motorcycle_jacket.html

(http://www.newenough.com/image/path/18494/Default.jpg)


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Stargzrgrl on May 27, 2010, 09:48:04 pm
Too bad they don't have a US distributor anymore but I do like the few items I've been able to get from Baby Biker:

http://www.babybiker.co.uk/index.php (http://www.babybiker.co.uk/index.php)

(http://www.babybiker.co.uk/pictures/content1/Kids%20on%20gate%20web%20photo.jpg)


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: servicerifle on June 18, 2010, 07:55:43 am
Ladies,
I have a need, I hope you can help me out.

My wife needs a set of riding boots, something for summer would be best.  We'll be riding in late Aug-early September.  I was going to get a set of Gaerne Black Rose boots, but the reviews are that they're "hot."  

I want to be sure they're good quality and have ankle protection at the least.  Open to your comments.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jadziadax8 on June 18, 2010, 09:58:05 am
I love my Tourmaster Solution (http://www.newenough.com/street/boots/waterproof_sport_street_touring_boots/tour_master/solution_wp_road_motorcycle_boots.html) boots.  I've never felt then to be too hot in the summer.  


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: stefrrr on June 18, 2010, 01:10:04 pm
BMW has some cool boots... I don't remember what they're called. I use Alpinestars Ridge boots, which I like, but they haven't held up terribly well. If she's not going to be riding a lot, they'd probably be fine. I always wear coolmax socks and they were fine in Florida.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs. DantesDame on June 18, 2010, 01:12:25 pm
I can't help much other then to say don't get Aerostitch's Combat Touring boots. They're excellent boots but not if you're particular about your feet being able to breath  :o


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jadziadax8 on July 10, 2010, 09:51:50 am
For those of you looking for a good deal on a trackday, I just found out that the discounts for women on www.sportbiketracktime.com are unreal.  I just got a day of riding the full course of Autobahn in Joliet, IL for $135.  Normal price to ride the full course?  $190.

 :thumbsup:

Since I paid an extra $5 for my Club Femmoto membership, I'd say it's worth it.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: HappyRiding on July 12, 2010, 10:37:33 pm

I love my Tourmaster Solution (http://www.newenough.com/street/boots/waterproof_sport_street_touring_boots/tour_master/solution_wp_road_motorcycle_boots.html) boots.  I've never felt then to be too hot in the summer.  


I've put about 20K on my TM Solution boots. They are a nice boot for a bit over a hundred bucks and are waterproof. They seem to offer pretty good ankle protection for a touring boot and I didn't notice them being hot until the temps reached the upper 80's. I will sacrifice a little sweat to keep from having prune toes in the rain.

After about a year the leather wasn't totally waterproof but after spraying them with a bit of CampDry all was well.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: cultureslayer on August 06, 2010, 11:28:03 pm
I'm about to buy a jacket and forgot if Firstgear is one of the brands that's good for women with wide shoulders/long arms.  The last time I tried on a joe rocket that fit in the torso it looked like it had 3/4 length sleeves.  Teknic works for me and my fieldsheer josie mesh jacket is ok (sleeves are just long enough and the torso fits with the adjusters all tightened down).  There isn't much of a selection locally except for the ill fitting joe rocket, and I just want a cheap mesh jacket to bum around town in.  I already have a perforated leather one for longer summer trips.  The fieldsheer josie is 4 years old and starting to look worn.  I am afraid to hang it on the coat rack at work in case someone sees that the lining is gray instead of white in some places because I have not washed it as often as I should.  :crazy:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: stefrrr on August 07, 2010, 12:09:31 am
I have nothing useful to offer; I just can't get over the fact that you have a cat for an avatar.  :lol:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jadziadax8 on August 07, 2010, 01:16:58 pm

I'm about to buy a jacket and forgot if Firstgear is one of the brands that's good for women with wide shoulders/long arms.  The last time I tried on a joe rocket that fit in the torso it looked like it had 3/4 length sleeves.  Teknic works for me and my fieldsheer josie mesh jacket is ok (sleeves are just long enough and the torso fits with the adjusters all tightened down).  There isn't much of a selection locally except for the ill fitting joe rocket, and I just want a cheap mesh jacket to bum around town in.  I already have a perforated leather one for longer summer trips.  The fieldsheer josie is 4 years old and starting to look worn.  I am afraid to hang it on the coat rack at work in case someone sees that the lining is gray instead of white in some places because I have not washed it as often as I should.  :crazy:


You could always try a bunch of different jackets through New Enough.  Their exchange policy (http://www.newenough.com/info_pages/faq_exchanges.html) is pretty generous.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: stinky93071 on September 30, 2010, 05:12:41 pm
a friend of a friend has started this page.. I told her I would pass it on to other women riders so that's what I am doing..


http://girlclutch.com/
 


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: vulcanbill on October 18, 2010, 11:43:18 am
This thread might be relevant to your interests...

https://www.sport-touring.net/forums/index.php/topic,57866.0.html

girl power


Title: Holiday gifts for the female motorcyclist
Post by: jsanford on December 27, 2010, 01:31:51 pm

Chime in if someone gave you a pair of motorcycle earrings.  Again.  :sleepy:


Title: Re: Holiday gifts for the female motorcyclist
Post by: cultureslayer on December 29, 2010, 04:06:05 pm


Chime in if someone gave you a pair of motorcycle earrings.  Again.  :sleepy:

This is the good thing about a nickel allergy, no jewelry as presents.  :bigok:  Unless you have someone in your life that's not a cheapass and will buy palladium, platinum, or titanium.  Non-issue for me.  


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs. DantesDame on December 30, 2010, 07:48:07 pm
Dan bought me a copy of "10 Years on 2 Wheels"  :inlove:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jsanford on April 21, 2011, 12:25:03 am
Over the past two weeks, after we finally broke 50 degrees in daytime temperatures here in Puget Sound, I began noticing a new phenonemon in motorcycling:  the female commuter.

Most of the past six years, if I wanted to see another female motorcyclist operating a motorcycle on the road during the weekday commute I'd have to arrange to meet up with her--with the exception of scooters (not to discount those) and perhaps a handful of others.  This week alone I've seen other women commuting on motorcycles every day.  The dead giveaways have been luggage on the bike (regardless of type) and gear--what's on the market in textile jackets for women all look alike to me.  The motorcycle was often in the "practical" category--Versys, or metric cruiser.  Oh, and one DS Sport with full fairing.

I don't remember this occurring the last time gasoline broke $4 a gallon.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs. DantesDame on April 21, 2011, 08:19:51 am
Hey, speaking of this thread, Tiez is starting the preliminaries for a woman's riding suit. Currently, the only conversation I know of it over on ADV http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=675279

I think I'll ask them to jump in over here, perhaps starting a new thread.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: stefrrr on April 21, 2011, 05:32:58 pm
Woooooohooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo oo! I rode to work last Wednesday. My rain pants - reinforced at the knees - leaked where the reinforcement was sewn on. :rolleyes:
My gloves were soaked.The only thing dry were my head, torso, and feet.  :facepalm:
I really, really, really, really, really, really want a one-piece suit. And 'lectrics.  :baldy:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jsanford on May 01, 2011, 03:29:11 pm

Might want to try Rainy Pass (http://"http://www.rainypass.com") for the pants.  They can tape the seams on your rainpants which ought to re-seal them.  They've replaced the zippers on gear and have repaired both of the Gore-tex jacket liners for my BMW jackets and their work has been solid.  For the gloves, Ride West's gear swap is in a couple of weeks and I know at least one pair of waterproof Rev'ITs will be available there.  ;)


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Squijummonkey on May 22, 2011, 05:15:26 pm
Hey ladies! Here's something that's been bothering me:

For the times when I'm not riding with my full leather suit on, I ride with regular (on the hip) jeans and, if hot enough, something like a spaghetti strap with a textile jacket (it seems I can't find any jackets that fit over my hips). My problem is, when hunched over on my bike, my jacket and shirt ride up and pants kind of do a dip which results in this awkward "smiley face" on my lower back.  My reach for the handlebars is pretty far, so that is mostly the problem with the top layers riding up. Question I have for all of you, if this is even relevant, is how to avoid this? Keep in mind trying to stay cool in 80-90 degree weather. I thought about buying a leotard from a dance shop (swimsuits dip too low). I haven't ruled out jeans sitting on the waist, problem is, they aren't easy to come by, especially with today's style trends. Then there's always buying shirts 3 times my size to get them to tuck into my jeans...still a little awkward.

Any suggestions?


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: cultureslayer on May 22, 2011, 05:22:03 pm

Hey ladies! Here's something that's been bothering me:

For the times when I'm not riding with my full leather suit on, I ride with regular (on the hip) jeans and, if hot enough, something like a spaghetti strap with a textile jacket (it seems I can't find any jackets that fit over my hips). My problem is, when hunched over on my bike, my jacket and shirt ride up and pants kind of do a dip which results in this awkward "smiley face" on my lower back.  My reach for the handlebars is pretty far, so that is mostly the problem with the top layers riding up. Question I have for all of you, if this is even relevant, is how to avoid this? Keep in mind trying to stay cool in 80-90 degree weather. I thought about buying a leotard from a dance shop (swimsuits dip too low). I haven't ruled out jeans sitting on the waist, problem is, they aren't easy to come by, especially with today's style trends. Then there's always buying shirts 3 times my size to get them to tuck into my jeans...still a little awkward.

Any suggestions?

I'm not normally an old navy fan, but they have some almost tunic length polos and tees that solved this issue for me.  


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Squijummonkey on May 22, 2011, 05:29:43 pm
I'm not an Old Navy fan either, but they don't seem all that expensive; I'll have to check them out  :bigok:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs. DantesDame on May 22, 2011, 06:45:27 pm

For the times when I'm not riding with my full leather suit on, I ride with regular (on the hip) jeans and, if hot enough, something like a spaghetti strap with a textile jacket

Any suggestions?


Get some textile pants that will zip to the bottom of your jacket? :shrug:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Squijummonkey on May 22, 2011, 07:02:41 pm



Get some textile pants that will zip to the bottom of your jacket? :shrug:


Doesn't have a zipper to connect it to pants, although, a new jacket isn't out of the question entirely. I'd rather go that route when I have to retire my current one; I just picked it up last year =\


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs. DantesDame on May 22, 2011, 09:09:07 pm

Doesn't have a zipper to connect it to pants, although, a new jacket isn't out of the question entirely. I'd rather go that route when I have to retire my current one; I just picked it up last year =\
I understand   :thumbsup:

In the meantime, how about new pants and a seamstress who will sew in a good, quality zipper for you from jacket to pants? I always send my stuff to a seamstress to replace the weeny 8" zipper that comes with most gear and give me a 3/4 circumference zipper. It isn't that much $$ and makes me feel much more secure. After all, if you go asphalt sliding, it is not uncommon for the jacket to ride up and leave you with a really nasty "smiley face" on your back  :crazy:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Squijummonkey on May 22, 2011, 10:09:21 pm
That's a great idea. I have a seamstress who doesn't mind doing crazy work for me  :lol: it's not the first, nor will it be the last, I'm sure. But you're right, I didn't take into account asphalt sliding =( Maybe new pants will definitely be in order


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs. DantesDame on May 25, 2011, 07:59:52 am
Tiez has finally introduced their women's textile custom gear. New thread started over here (https://www.sport-touring.net/forums/index.php/topic,63496.msg1462410/topicseen.html#new)  :thumbsup:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jsanford on July 03, 2011, 12:23:08 pm
Ladies--I picked up a pair of Alpinestar race boots at the closeout table at Seattle Cycle (who do online orders) in my boyfriend's size, but when we unboxed the boots, it turns out they're women's race boots.  You'd never know, except for the size tag.  Anyway, they're too big for me--which is something I've NEVER said about women's motorcycle boots--with ankle torsion limiters, toe guards, and replaceable soles.

I'm going to return them this morning, but thought I'd mention them in this thread because I'd never heard of women's motorcycle boots in Euro size 44.  I'm a 43 and have only seen them go up to 41.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: rocketbunny on July 10, 2011, 11:44:47 pm
wah wah

I'm 4 1/2 months pregnant and feeling pretty down tonight. Babybunny is due in December. I was commuting until the nausea kicked in. I'm feeling better now, but with the Texas summer in full blast, I don't even want to do that. I was browsing Riderwearhouse and Twistedthrottle tonight scoping out fun farkles and gear for future trips.

I had to cancel a big trip last year (2010) because of our wedding. Then I canceled a planned 10 day southwest ride in May because of all day morning sickness. Looking ahead, I'm having a hard time envisioning when I'm going to be able to do my next big multi-day ride out of Texas. I'm planning on BF'g...so I guess that means I'll have to wait until baby is at least mostly weaned... Any experiences??? Reassurance???


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: bluepoof on July 11, 2011, 12:01:11 am
Absolutely no experience or advice, but a BIG HEARTFELT CONGRATULATIONS!!!  :inlove: :inlove: :inlove:

I can relate to the "not riding for a while" part, so I can reassure you that it does suck but that you will be back on the bike.  :bigok:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: stromgal on July 11, 2011, 03:53:29 pm
Becca, congrats! Your life will change in unbelievable ways, and you will no doubt experience Mama Lion moments that make you feel like a superwoman.  ;)

I BF both my sons, and although I couldn't take looooong trips, I would go out for rides in the evening when my husband was home, and pump/store milk for weekend moto-trips. I never quit riding, 'though I didn't manage a week-long trip until the kids were on solid food.

It'll work out, honest!

bj


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jadziadax8 on July 14, 2011, 10:52:59 pm

wah wah

I'm 4 1/2 months pregnant and feeling pretty down tonight. Babybunny is due in December. I was commuting until the nausea kicked in. I'm feeling better now, but with the Texas summer in full blast, I don't even want to do that. I was browsing Riderwearhouse and Twistedthrottle tonight scoping out fun farkles and gear for future trips.

I had to cancel a big trip last year (2010) because of our wedding. Then I canceled a planned 10 day southwest ride in May because of all day morning sickness. Looking ahead, I'm having a hard time envisioning when I'm going to be able to do my next big multi-day ride out of Texas. I'm planning on BF'g...so I guess that means I'll have to wait until baby is at least mostly weaned... Any experiences??? Reassurance???


Congrats on having a little bunny on the way!  I totally sympathize with the morning sickness.  By the time I wasn't sick, I couldn't fit in my gear any more. :thumbsdown:

Just weaned my son last month (he's 14 months now).  Haven't had a chance to even do weekends this summer.  Hubby has worked a bunch of weekends or some such nonsense has come up.  I'm still not comfy making someone else take time away from their busy schedules to watch dude for me while I go and have fun.  Thinking of taking a ride tomorrow, since I have the day off and he's legitimately at the babysitter. :lol:

You can take weekends away from the baby while you're breastfeeding.  Make sure to stockpile enough milk so your hubby can bottle feed him/her (liquid gold, baby!).  Plan on bringing your pump and stopping every couple of hours to express.  After more time than that, you will feel like you're gonna asplode.  Have a good cooler on the bike for storage.  If you're willing to go through all that BS, your a better woman than I. ;)

If you have any questions or concerns about breastfeeding, feel free to shoot me a pm.  I managed to pump at work successfully for a whole year, and am happy to share tips and tricks.  I feel very proud of the fact that dude never needed formula while he was at the babysitter.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: rocketbunny on July 15, 2011, 10:38:51 pm
Thanks BJ and Jadziadax8. Very encouraging. Hopefully I'll be able to do some weekend rides this spring... Maybe even Eureka Springs for National in June (it's close enough to make a 3-4 day ride... but that'd be a lot of stockpiling).

Carolyn, sorry for whining... I know your back issues are much bigger and seem to be longer term than this whole temporary inconvenience/baby thing. :(

Thanks for the "Congrats" everyone!



Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: bluepoof on July 15, 2011, 10:59:05 pm


Carolyn, sorry for whining... I know your back issues are much bigger and seem to be longer term than this whole temporary inconvenience/baby thing. :(


Dude, you weren't whining at all!! Plus, at least I wasn't puking during my back problems!  I'm scared to death that I might wind up with morning (all day) sickness someday!  :crazy: :lol:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jadziadax8 on July 16, 2011, 02:42:39 pm

Dude, you weren't whining at all!! Plus, at least I wasn't puking during my back problems!  I'm scared to death that I might wind up with morning (all day) sickness someday!  :crazy: :lol:


"Morning sickness" is a cruel, cruel euphemism!

rocketbunny, lately, I've been getting my 2 wheel fix by hauling the kiddo around in a Burley trailer behind my bike (gotta wait until they're 1).  A fast downhill *almost* feels as good as wicking it up on the backroads. :lol:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: bluepoof on January 26, 2012, 03:45:36 pm
Does anyone have a lead on any blogs by moms who ride/tour?  :headscratch:   Googling things like "motorcycling moms" etc just brings up pages of crap about how bikes are dangerous and that ANY GOOD MOTHER would SELL THAT THING RIGHT AWAY.  :facepalm:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs. DantesDame on January 26, 2012, 05:48:06 pm

ANY GOOD MOTHER would SELL THAT THING RIGHT AWAY.  :facepalm:


it's true: you should sell THAT THING and buy a Ural  :bigok:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: JReazor on January 26, 2012, 06:52:06 pm

Does anyone have a lead on any blogs by moms who ride/tour?  :headscratch:   Googling things like "motorcycling moms" etc just brings up pages of crap about how bikes are dangerous and that ANY GOOD MOTHER would SELL THAT THING RIGHT AWAY.  :facepalm:



Check out Fuzzygalore's blog if you haven't already. It's not really about being a mother who rides but that's what she is. Her munchkin just got a new dirt bike a few months ago. She makes an occasional appearance (http://www.fuzzygalore.com/2011/12/riding-motorcycles-with-my-daughter-is-heaven/).



Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: bluepoof on January 26, 2012, 07:53:02 pm

Check out Fuzzygalore's blog if you haven't already. It's not really about being a mother who rides but that's what she is. Her munchkin just got a new dirt bike a few months ago. She makes an occasional appearance (http://www.fuzzygalore.com/2011/12/riding-motorcycles-with-my-daughter-is-heaven/).


I've been reading it a lot lately!  I just dropped her an email, too, so hopefully I didn't sound like a creeper.  :crazy:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jadziadax8 on February 03, 2012, 09:13:25 pm

Does anyone have a lead on any blogs by moms who ride/tour?  :headscratch:   Googling things like "motorcycling moms" etc just brings up pages of crap about how bikes are dangerous and that ANY GOOD MOTHER would SELL THAT THING RIGHT AWAY.  :facepalm:


I must be the world's worst mom.  I'm already asking The Sprout if he wants to ride with mommy on the motorcycle.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: stromgal on February 03, 2012, 09:33:16 pm
FWIW, I never gave up riding. Not during pregnancies, not during child-raising. As soon as the kids were big enough to reach the footpegs, they rode with me.  :inlove:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: bluepoof on February 03, 2012, 10:04:44 pm

I must be the world's worst best mom.  I'm already asking The Sprout if he wants to ride with mommy on the motorcycle.


Fixed!!

I confess to looking forward to taking birth announcement pictures with blueberry in the Givi tail bag. :lol:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jadziadax8 on February 04, 2012, 01:32:43 pm

Fixed!!

I confess to looking forward to taking birth announcement pictures with blueberry in the Givi tail bag. :lol:


Like this?

(http://i140.photobucket.com/albums/r10/jadziadax8/Miles/100_2377.jpg)

(http://i140.photobucket.com/albums/r10/jadziadax8/Miles/100_2378.jpg)

Baby's 1st trackday (at 5 weeks).

(http://i140.photobucket.com/albums/r10/jadziadax8/Miles/100_2317.jpg)


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: bluepoof on February 04, 2012, 02:12:09 pm
YES!!! Exactly!  :inlove: :inlove: :inlove: :inlove: :inlove: :inlove: :inlove: :inlove: :inlove:

:lol:



Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: bomber on February 09, 2012, 10:13:38 am
I can testify that lil Miles is growing up well adjusted, funny, and happy . . . . . all that noise musta been good for him!

At a recent get-together, he walked up to my wife, grabbed her by the hand, and wandered off with her . . . the kid's got it!


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: katego on February 17, 2012, 01:11:20 am



it's true: you should sell THAT THING and buy a Ural  :bigok:



with a kid seat.

-k


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Kawgurl on January 07, 2013, 05:26:35 pm
Seriously ? No post on here since Feb 2012 ?   :facepalm:

Where are all the lady ST riders out there ?  Hellllloooooo ?   :wave:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs. DantesDame on January 07, 2013, 05:29:52 pm
I'm here, but I have nothing womanly to say  :wave:

What's new on your end of town?  :popcorn:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Kawgurl on January 07, 2013, 05:36:23 pm

I'm here, but I have nothing womanly to say  :wave:

What's new on your end of town?  :popcorn:


Well hi there - lol that could be the reason this thread is so stale...!  

Not much other than the bike show just blew outta town and the countdown is on for spring.  Only another let's see....4 months.   :facepalm:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: bluepoof on January 07, 2013, 07:23:03 pm
I'm here too!  :bigok:  I'm still riding my one day per week but with the holidays and rainy weather I haven't been putting on many miles.  I'm hoping to get a nice ride in a week from tomorrow...fingers crossed that the weather holds.  


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Kawgurl on January 07, 2013, 10:40:26 pm

I'm here too!  :bigok:  I'm still riding my one day per week but with the holidays and rainy weather I haven't been putting on many miles.  I'm hoping to get a nice ride in a week from tomorrow...fingers crossed that the weather holds.  


Oh you lucky girl!! Very, very jealous you can ride at this time of year - even in the rain!  :drif:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: rocketbunny on January 15, 2013, 02:59:26 pm
Haven't been riding much, but we did just take kiddo (now 13 months) on a car trip through south-eastern Utah. She slept through most of Canyonlands NP, had a meltdown during the hike to Delicate Arch (Arches NP), and played in some snow at her aunt's house in Denver.

My ST needs a trip to the dealer. It never really woke up after the pregnancy (I'm thinking maybe a bad coil), but I did some riding on the F650GS over the summer. Both are parked in the garage for now. #2 is due in mid-June. I'm hoping to be able to start doing motorcycle trips again in spring/summer 2014.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: bluepoof on January 15, 2013, 07:10:24 pm
#2 is due in mid-June.


 :omgomgomg: :omgomgomg: :omgomgomg: :wings: :wings: :wings:

Congrats!!  


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Stargzrgrl on February 04, 2013, 05:22:31 pm

Haven't been riding much, but we did just take kiddo (now 13 months) on a car trip through south-eastern Utah. She slept through most of Canyonlands NP, had a meltdown during the hike to Delicate Arch (Arches NP), and played in some snow at her aunt's house in Denver.

My ST needs a trip to the dealer. It never really woke up after the pregnancy (I'm thinking maybe a bad coil), but I did some riding on the F650GS over the summer. Both are parked in the garage for now. #2 is due in mid-June. I'm hoping to be able to start doing motorcycle trips again in spring/summer 2014.


OMG!!!  Congratulations!!!


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Stargzrgrl on February 04, 2013, 05:32:10 pm
I'm here too, just been lurking a lot.  :shrug:

Just been a bit bummed not having a core group of riders here that I can go riding with at anytime like back in Region 4.  I would like to do some more dual sport riding with my XT but seeing as I'm not at all familiar with this area and my lack of directional prowess...  I just don't want to be rescued far from home.   :crazy:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Joni234 on February 07, 2013, 12:07:33 pm
Hi ladies, This is my first time on here. I have a question....I am getting a new bike. I have had a Motto Guzzi Breva 750. That was my first bike and I sold it because I am only 5' and I could only get it low enough to get my tip toes on the ground and I felt unsecure. I then bought a ninja 250. I loved that bike and it was a great bike to learn on. Now I am getting something bigger.  My question is What is your opinions...I am deciding between a Ninja 650 and a BMW G650GS. I ride a lot. I live in Florida and I ride to Georgia and the Carolina's. Also I ride all year long. Any input? :)

Thanks


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: cultureslayer on February 07, 2013, 12:12:04 pm
Whichever one you feel most comfortable sitting on.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: bluepoof on February 07, 2013, 05:24:52 pm
I am deciding between a Ninja 650 and a BMW G650GS.


Hi!  :wave:  I don't think you can go wrong with either bike; like cultureslayer mentioned, it'll be whichever you're more comfortable on.  I'm 5'1" and fit slightly better on the stock Beemer than the stock Ninja 650, but I sat on a lowered 650 and it was awesome.  Remember to also check out the reach to the bars and the width of the bars, too.

Either bike would be great for racking up lots of miles. :inlove:  I owned a F650GS, the predecessor to the G650GS, and would buy one again in a heartbeat.

I'm no help because I currently ride a Ninja 250 and the Ninja 650 and G650GS are my two top choices in case I ever "upgrade" again, so I haven't decided between them yet either. :lol: :lol:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jadziadax8 on February 07, 2013, 07:38:37 pm
Hi ladies, This is my first time on here. I have a question....I am getting a new bike. I have had a Motto Guzzi Breva 750. That was my first bike and I sold it because I am only 5' and I could only get it low enough to get my tip toes on the ground and I felt unsecure. I then bought a ninja 250. I loved that bike and it was a great bike to learn on. Now I am getting something bigger.  My question is What is your opinions...I am deciding between a Ninja 650 and a BMW G650GS. I ride a lot. I live in Florida and I ride to Georgia and the Carolina's. Also I ride all year long. Any input? :)

Thanks

The Ninja has a very narrow seat which can help a lot with confidence.  I love mine, and have ridden the snot out of it, but at 5'8" tall I've never had any trouble flatfooting it.  I'm kinda not qualified in this arena.   :lol:

Also, I can't believe that 'poof forgot to mention her favorite boots for the vertically challenged.  The Daytona Ladystar (http://www.motardinn.com/motorcycle-equipment/daytona-lady-star-goretex-black/23506/p?utm_source=google_products&utm_medium=merchant&id_producte=135253&gclid=CMvj6q-7pbUCFe9aMgodFVAAVA) boots add some height without advertising that you're wearing lifts.



Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Joni234 on February 07, 2013, 10:26:37 pm
Thanks for the input.  I do have modified boots already...the sole is 1 1/2 inches and still I can't reach the ground on either bike.  Lowering is a must. Though I had to lower my 250 as well. I am so torn between the two. I love the beemer....and that was my first choice....then I sat on the ninja and thought, I could do this one too...LOL. Well I will ponder a little more. I was just wondering if any of you had a preference and why. I just retired and get my retirement money in 3 weeks...I have already sold the 250 and am itching to ride.
I am so glad I found this site. It's nice to have ladies to talk to.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: bluepoof on February 07, 2013, 11:02:14 pm

Also, I can't believe that 'poof forgot to mention her favorite boots for the vertically challenged. 


Doh, you're right!! I'm losing my touch! :lol:

Joni, congrats on the retirement!  :bigok:  What part of Florida are you in?  


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Joni234 on February 07, 2013, 11:37:32 pm
Thank you.  I live in Sebastian FL. It's about 2 hours south of Daytona. Do you like the Daytona boots?  I was looking at them before. I just wasn't sure they were going to give me enough height. I met a lady at the races at Daytona a few years ago who told me about having my boots altered. So that's what I did. I kind of look like I should be going to a Kiss concert! LOL. My problem is my inseam is only about 27 1/2 inches.....It makes it really hard to find a bike to ride. I am also a fairly new rider. I have only been riding for about 4 years. I still feel more comfortable having at least the balls of my feet on the ground. All of the men I have talked to say all I need are my toes on the ground. I am sure they are right, but, I am not comfortable that way. Also with only my toes on the groung it makes it hard for me to move the bike.
That's probably silly...but that's me.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs. DantesDame on February 08, 2013, 03:32:04 am
Welcome Joni  :wave:

I am absolutely no help to you in this regard, so I'll just say Hi and then sit in the shadows until you have a different question  :D

That's bluepoof on the left and me on the right

(http://dantesdame.smugmug.com/MotorcycleTrips-1/Pacific-Northwest/Tahuya-2007/i-qx59Gxt/0/M/Picture%20132-M.jpg)


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: bluepoof on February 08, 2013, 12:45:00 pm
Damn, I'm short. :lol:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs. DantesDame on February 08, 2013, 02:07:35 pm

Damn, I'm short. :lol:


And this is news to you?  :pokestick:   :D

(but there's just so much *awesome* involved!)


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Joni234 on February 10, 2013, 08:35:44 am
What a great picture. Poof you are short...but, I am shorter...LOL. That bike looks huge for you.
Well I think I have made my decision, I am leaning towards the G650GS.  I really love that bike. As they say...when I look at it, it blows my skirt up. The other thing is when I sit on it, I can sit up straighter. I am getting to old to be all bent over when I ride. As soon as I get it I will take a picture and post it on here so you can all see me and my new bike.  Well that is as soon as I can figure out how to post a picture.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: bluepoof on February 10, 2013, 08:50:33 am

What a great picture. Poof you are short...but, I am shorter...LOL. That bike looks huge for you.


The KLR in the pic was borrowed and had 4" lowering links. I'm also wearing the Ladystar boots with rise in that pic. :lol:

Hooray for the Beemer!! I love that bike.  :inlove:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs. DantesDame on February 10, 2013, 10:19:51 am

What a great picture. Poof you are short...

It probably doesn't help that I'm almost 6' with socks on  :)


As soon as I get it I will take a picture and post it on here so you can all see me and my new bike.  Well that is as soon as I can figure out how to post a picture.


This link here should help with the photo posting (https://www.sport-touring.net/forums/index.php/topic,43625.0.html#.URe6QVqjem0)  :thumbsup:  Nice choice on the bike - I'm looking forward to seeing it!


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Joni234 on February 10, 2013, 10:36:56 am
Thank's for the link. Where was that picture taken? I just realized that poof is in CA, and you are in Switzerland. I think it's great that you two met and rode together.
When it comes to buying bikes....I wish I was six foot tall with my socks on...LOL (Great line by the way). Everybody is always trying to get me on a cruiser...I don't want to ride a cruiser. (just not my style)
Now if I could just find good gear for women. They have all the girlie stuff (but most of that is not for girls that ride, only for the show pieces on the back of the bike). Finding gear made to fit woman and be water proof and have the right armor is not as easy. Most of my gear is men's and I make it work.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs. DantesDame on February 10, 2013, 11:10:44 am

Thank's for the link. Where was that picture taken? I just realized that poof is in CA, and you are in Switzerland. I think it's great that you two met and rode together.

I used to live in Seattle and met poof at an STN event a long, long time ago and we became good friends ever since  :inlove:  That photo was taken at Tehuya off road park on the Olympic Peninsula in Washington State.


Finding gear made to fit woman and be water proof and have the right armor is not as easy. Most of my gear is men's and I make it work.

Poof might come back and tell you about her custom made Tiez suit....  :augie:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Joni234 on February 10, 2013, 12:12:21 pm
That's great. I wish I had females to ride with. My boyfriend and I ride...but not as often as I would like. He works nights and sleeps most of the day. Now that I am retired, I have all the time in the world to ride and no one to ride with.
Seattle is beautiful....I bet the riding is great there. My Ex-daughter-in-law and grandson live there.
I will wait to hear from poof about riding gear. I have talked to all of the major companys and they say they can not customize down enough. They only will cut off so many inches..and of course it is never quite enough.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: bluepoof on February 10, 2013, 01:08:12 pm
Hee!  OK, I'm back! I'm back!  :lol: :lol:

Gear, oh my.  I've had the same problem with Aerostich not customizing enough.   I finally spent the money and got a fully customized suit from Teiz Motorsports:  http://store.teizms.com/revolution

Here's my review when I first got it. (http://www.bluepoof.com/2011/10/teiz-revolution/)

I love it -- it's pretty much the same price as a 'Stich but is 100% custom.  My only problem is that I've lost almost 25 lbs since I had it made and it's big in places now.  I'm afraid to get it re-sized because I have no idea whether I'm going to regain the size (silly pregnancy/baby/breastfeeding got things all wonky).  :lol:

The other gear that I've had good luck with is FirstGear HT Overpants (though if you're really skinny as well as short, they only go down to a size 6) and BMW jackets.  The jackets are spendy compared to other manufacturers, but I've found that they have sizes that actually fit small women.  My Santiago jacket fits in the arms and the elbows don't wander around, which happened with every other jacket I've ever had.  :rolleyes:



Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Joni234 on February 10, 2013, 02:10:52 pm
Thanks for the info Poof....I tried stitch...and Gerbings, firstgear and road crafter. I do have a gerbings jacket...I just can not wear it right now. I have had 2 heart attacks and with all the medicine I take I have put on 50 pounds. If I am completely honest most of that is from the medicine and some is from depression :o. Better now decided to stop feeling sorry for myself and get back in action...lol. Just the action is a little slower with the extra weight....LOLOL. Funny though...it doesn't want to come off as easy as it went on. Oh well such is life. I will go to that link and see what I can do. Thank you so much for sharing it with me.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs. DantesDame on February 10, 2013, 02:37:42 pm
'Poof and Dante, tag teaming from opposites sides of the earth.  :lol:


(https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcS8TKbSgxhTFNUrhRkaRwI--6uYNi7s7-KjBdZUj7pzcYkczXtF)


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jadziadax8 on February 10, 2013, 03:54:32 pm

Thanks for the info Poof....I tried stitch...and Gerbings, firstgear and road crafter. I do have a gerbings jacket...I just can not wear it right now. I have had 2 heart attacks and with all the medicine I take I have put on 50 pounds. If I am completely honest most of that is from the medicine and some is from depression :o. Better now decided to stop feeling sorry for myself and get back in action...lol. Just the action is a little slower with the extra weight....LOLOL. Funny though...it doesn't want to come off as easy as it went on. Oh well such is life. I will go to that link and see what I can do. Thank you so much for sharing it with me.



The weight can come off!  I lost 90 lbs between June 2011 and June 2012 while doing WeightWatchers.  I highly recommend!  I have kept the weight off a full 6 months now, and feel great.

I feel your pain when it comes to gear.  They all cheap out on the women's stuff.  When I have kept the weight off a year, I plan on treating myself to a custon Teiz suit (as long as I haven't gone bankrupt with all the stuff going wrong with my new house).


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Joni234 on February 10, 2013, 04:24:45 pm
 :eek: Darn houses can break you so fast...Will send good thoughts your way to stop the house problems. I have been thinking about joining weight watchers...I have tried so many different things. So far nothing has worked (for the weight that is...however, emptying my wallet...they have all worked very well). Well I hope the house doesn't break you, you deserve a new suit. Good luck


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: cultureslayer on February 16, 2013, 11:16:00 am

 :eek: Darn houses can break you so fast...Will send good thoughts your way to stop the house problems. I have been thinking about joining weight watchers...I have tried so many different things. So far nothing has worked (for the weight that is...however, emptying my wallet...they have all worked very well). Well I hope the house doesn't break you, you deserve a new suit. Good luck

Paleo has worked for me for maintaining my weight and dropping a few lbs (I've got thyroid problems, so I'm afraid if I put on more than a couple lbs it won't come off again).  I've heard that food addicts uses similar principles of eliminating processed sugar and incorporating fat into your meals so you feel satiated.  http://www.foodaddictsanonymous.org/

The house stuff made me miss the last ESTN and has really cut into my riding time.  At least we bought it planning to renovate so there haven't been too many surprises.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jadziadax8 on February 17, 2013, 04:57:47 pm

At least we bought it planning to renovate so there haven't been too many surprises.


We planned on renovation as well, but weren't expecting to have $4000 in plumber's bills!  All the plumbers were supposed to do was put in 2 toilets and 2 faucets.  Two days of work later we still ended up installing our own toilet. :facepalm:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jsanford on May 10, 2013, 02:40:58 am
I have not much to contribute, other than I lost 40 pounds on weight watchers in 2011 and have kept it off, and recommend the program.  Still go to meetings and it's rather neat what they're emphasizing now.

The F twin motor is terrific; and just gets smoother with age.  I think there are sizing options with the GS series; BMW was big on promoting that last year.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Poniesatemybagel on May 17, 2013, 03:37:25 pm
Hi ladies, I don't mean to intrude. I had a quick question, what got you into riding?

My wife rides pillion with me and in a bit less than 3 weeks we're doing a fly and ride to pick up my new C14 in Georgia and then ride it back to CA. She really likes working on bikes and riding pillion, I think she would enjoy riding her own more though. She's really nervous about the idea and in general doesn't have a lot of self confidence. I was thinking of getting some small scooters or something and doing some riding around town so she could try and get used to the idea of her own bike. I'm trying really hard not to push her, it's just about every 3 weeks or so she tells me she wishes that she knew how to ride. I'd have her take the MSF, but she has social anxiety problems and I think it would freak her out/put her off of it.

Any suggestions/recommendations?


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Mrs. DantesDame on May 17, 2013, 03:52:30 pm

Hi ladies, I don't mean to intrude. I had a quick question, what got you into riding?

It won't help you, but since you asked, here's my story (http://dantesdame.wordpress.com/about/learning/)


Any suggestions/recommendations?


It's too bad that she won't take the MSF. I have no idea, but is there a way to have her take a private-type lesson? Maybe buddy up with an MSF teacher and ask him he'd show her the course on her own? Not to get certified, but just to see if she likes it and if she does, to give her the confidence to go the class. I'd really push for this, because putting her on the street, even on a small scooter, without proper training is not a good idea. Just like you shouldn't try to teach her yourself  :o


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: Poniesatemybagel on May 17, 2013, 06:38:14 pm


It won't help you, but since you asked, here's my story (http://dantesdame.wordpress.com/about/learning/)



It's too bad that she won't take the MSF. I have no idea, but is there a way to have her take a private-type lesson? Maybe buddy up with an MSF teacher and ask him he'd show her the course on her own? Not to get certified, but just to see if she likes it and if she does, to give her the confidence to go the class. I'd really push for this, because putting her on the street, even on a small scooter, without proper training is not a good idea. Just like you shouldn't try to teach her yourself  :o


Neat story!

I recently retook the MSF after the DMV screwed up my license and I lost my class M. I tried to get her to go with me, but she just can't stand the idea of that many people around her. She's really social phobic, I actually have all the course-work from the MSF and was considering just teaching her myself. We've taught each other a lot and I don't think it would be to bad. I've been riding over 20 years and although you can always improve I feel like I could teach her the basics without her developing bad habits.

We've ridden 50's together before, she really enjoyed that. She loves to ride, she's just scared she'd be to klutzy on the bike and the idea of being around people prevents her from getting the training advantage MSF offers.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: bluepoof on May 17, 2013, 09:11:50 pm
I think Dante's suggestion of private lessons is a good one -- would she be open to that?  I don't have social anxiety in particular, but I've wrestled with anxiety and panic disorder my whole life and I can totally see where a big MSF class experience might be scary at best and dangerous/counterproductive at worst.



Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jsanford on May 21, 2013, 10:55:05 am
One of the schools around here offers women-only BRC classes.  One session was in the next range over when I was taking the ERC or ARC (can't recall which).  I know it filled up early and had a woman instructor and vanna coach.  Can't remark on anything else except it seemed like a typical BRC.

I am torn between wondering if social anxiety would be a liability riding--sometimes you have to be assertive riding and of course, pretty always feel free to express an opinion or offer unsolicited advice when you stop for any kind of errand on the motorcycle--or really empowering.

I'd say don't push. My fiance scuba dives and I tried taking a class as I'd like him to have a reliable dive partner but had a terrible time and found I'm not really interested at this time. It may be something I want someday, but not now.

Motorcycling I came around to on my own, and I think that was key for me.  I loved staying up late to watch CHiPs when I was a kid, and always wanted to learn, but was terrified to do so.  One year I just decided to do it.  I think I was terrified of my own lack of experience for most of the first year riding, but practiced and added experiences when I thought I was ready (except for night riding, but that's a story for another time). I decided to learn out of the blue--was single and didn't have any friends who rode motorcycles.  There have been some disadvantages to learning that way as well;  group rides make me nervous, especially when I know how little it takes to get endorsed.

If your wife is happy riding pillion then I would leave it at that.  If she does decide to learn to ride, she won't want to ride as a passenger every again. :-)


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jsanford on May 21, 2013, 11:02:08 am
Came to the thread to share my thoughts about the Roadcrafter women's models.

I went to Aerostich's Seattle event last Saturday.  Prior to then, I wasn't even aware that Aerostich was making a women's line.  While part of me thought that was cool, I also suspected that I wasn't the target market, as I don't have a problem finding gear.  At 5'10" I'm tall enough and my frame carries enough weight that I can fill out a lot of the gear.  Still, I hoped the women's line would have sizing that made sense for the typical American woman, whose average size is 14.

In this I was disappointed.  I could zip into the Size 8 and Size 10 just fine.  They were too short in the sleeves and legs and torso, which I would expect, but the Roadcrafter suit was snug in the shoulders and chest, which I wouldn't.  I don't have particularly broad shoulders and am certainly not endowed.

If I were shorter and had more of a willowy build the suit would have fit great, but so would most Italian manufactured options by Dainese and Spidi.  The fit and finish and features were on par with the men's gear and the price was the same so Aerostich deserves kudos for that.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: bluepoof on May 21, 2013, 01:05:54 pm
So, if you were built like a small man, it would be great! :facepalm: Oh, Aerostich, you make it too easy to mock you.  :lol:


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: medjen on June 23, 2013, 04:00:18 pm
So, protection and function are very important, but my current MC overpants look remarkably like snowpants.

Do any of you ladies have a slim-ish fitting pair of protective pants that you're fond of? I'm was researching Kevlar jeans, but my options there seem to be super skinny (Dainese) or really baggy (just about all other Kevlar jeans).

Basically I'd like something that I can wear into a restaurant (not a NICE restaurant, just a restaurant) and not look like I've come in from a blizzard.

Suggestions? Budget is flexible for the right item, but preferably <$200.



Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jsanford on July 20, 2013, 01:34:25 pm
I have a pair of Hein Gericke G-Line leather pants which have the slim CE armor over the hips.  They're pretty much summer only, though--the leather isn't competition weight.  They're long enough for me though and have a high-enough waist with a zip connector.  

I also have a pair of Rallye Pro pants.  The BMW pants have Cordura panels so don't look too much like snowpants.

I stay away from riding jeans as I don't really trust them over about 30mph, and the waist is too low.  They look like Carhartts, only less comfortable.

Will you wear your riding pants over street clothes, or by themselves?


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: medjen on July 20, 2013, 01:40:22 pm

I have a pair of Hein Gericke G-Line leather pants which have the slim CE armor over the hips.  They're pretty much summer only, though--the leather isn't competition weight.  They're long enough for me though and have a high-enough waist with a zip connector.  

I also have a pair of Rallye Pro pants.  The BMW pants have Cordura panels so don't look too much like snowpants.

I stay away from riding jeans as I don't really trust them over about 30mph, and the waist is too low.  They look like Carhartts, only less comfortable.

Will you wear your riding pants over street clothes, or by themselves?

Thanks! I'll look into the G-Line and the Rallye Pros...

I'd like a pair to wear by themselves (over some leggings or the like if necessary). I think trying to wear something over my street clothes is part of the bulk problem.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: kitkite on August 15, 2013, 04:54:22 pm
i am in need of all new riding gear,  all my gear is too big,  in the past i wasn't impressed with women's gear, just didn't seem as much protection.  rt now i cinch the waist of my pants  they are so baggy now, and my jacket flaps in the wind.  wt loss is great  but   replacing the gear sucks.    4 different riding suits and none fit  LOL  what is a girl to do.     i have gone from a size 16/18 to 4


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: cultureslayer on August 15, 2013, 06:32:28 pm

i am in need of all new riding gear,  all my gear is too big,  in the past i wasn't impressed with women's gear, just didn't seem as much protection.  rt now i cinch the waist of my pants  they are so baggy now, and my jacket flaps in the wind.  wt loss is great  but   replacing the gear sucks.    4 different riding suits and none fit  LOL  what is a girl to do.     i have gone from a size 16/18 to 4

Go try lots of brands on.  With that much weight loss you will probably find that you need a different brand now.  The smaller sizes are sometimes an odd fit.  Joe rocket jackets look like they are supposed to be 3/4 sleeves on me.  :facepalm:  I'm so sad that teknic has gone out of business because all my jackets were from them and now I have no idea what to buy for my long arms. :(


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: kitkite on August 15, 2013, 06:36:57 pm


Go try lots of brands on.  With that much weight loss you will probably find that you need a different brand now.  The smaller sizes are sometimes an odd fit.  Joe rocket jackets look like they are supposed to be 3/4 sleeves on me.  :facepalm:  I'm so sad that teknic has gone out of business because all my jackets were from them and now I have no idea what to buy for my long arms. :(


I plan to start trying on gear soon  to see what fits, i tried on a womans jacket at the bmw shop and the shoulders were so tight on me,  and the womans pants have big hips,  mens small seem to be a great fit.   all the jackets i have the arms are too long  LOL


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jadziadax8 on August 16, 2013, 09:03:46 pm

i am in need of all new riding gear,  all my gear is too big,  in the past i wasn't impressed with women's gear, just didn't seem as much protection.  rt now i cinch the waist of my pants  they are so baggy now, and my jacket flaps in the wind.  wt loss is great  but   replacing the gear sucks.    4 different riding suits and none fit  LOL  what is a girl to do.     i have gone from a size 16/18 to 4


I feel your pain.  I did the same amount of weight loss about a year ago, and have cobbled together gear for riding that fits OK.  I'm saving up the cash for a custom suit from Teiz.  They make a women-specific 1 piece suit called the Revolution (http://store.teizms.com/revolution) that I have heard good things about.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jsanford on September 08, 2013, 01:29:41 pm
I just ordered the Dainese women's chest protector, the pro version.  Anyone use one of these?  I'm not even sure how it will fit.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jadziadax8 on September 12, 2013, 11:25:15 am

I just ordered the Dainese women's chest protector, the pro version.  Anyone use one of these?  I'm not even sure how it will fit.


Are you planning on spray-painting it gold?  Will you hum "Ride of the Valkyries" every time you wear it?


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jsanford on December 27, 2013, 01:12:41 am
Actually, I thought I'd follow up on this thing.

My first thought was that in a size medium, it wouldn't fit a woman who was terribly endowed--nothing more than a C cup, actually.  The rib protector is easy and comfortable enough to use every day.  It also had a benefit I hadn't considered--it protects the chest from the wind.  That's a big part of why I'm still using it this winter.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: kitkite on March 02, 2014, 08:14:25 pm
I wanted to share my find!    i got a motorcycle baby seat so my 3 yr old grandson can ride with me.   i have had it for about 5 months and it works great.  
(http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y125/Kitkite/017_zps8c416a37.jpg) (http://s4.photobucket.com/user/Kitkite/media/017_zps8c416a37.jpg.html)


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: jadziadax8 on March 03, 2014, 08:31:20 pm
I wanted to share my find!    i got a motorcycle baby seat so my 3 yr old grandson can ride with me.   i have had it for about 5 months and it works great. 
(http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y125/Kitkite/017_zps8c416a37.jpg) (http://s4.photobucket.com/user/Kitkite/media/017_zps8c416a37.jpg.html)

Omg, link please!


Sent through subspace from the U.S.S. Enterprise.


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: kitkite on March 03, 2014, 11:57:23 pm

Omg, link please!


Sent through subspace from the U.S.S. Enterprise.
[/quote

here is where i got it  http://www.motostorm.it/scheda_prodotto.asp?articolo=1209


Title: Re: STN's Pool of Knowledge for Women Riders
Post by: lionlady on March 05, 2015, 10:09:27 am

I wanted to share my find!    i got a motorcycle baby seat so my 3 yr old grandson can ride with me.   i have had it for about 5 months and it works great.  
(http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y125/Kitkite/017_zps8c416a37.jpg) (http://s4.photobucket.com/user/Kitkite/media/017_zps8c416a37.jpg.html)



OMG. I have no words for this. Does that helmet fit? It looks big.



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