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The Tech Zone => Mods & Maintenance => Topic started by: William on November 18, 2009, 10:52:15 pm



Title: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: William on November 18, 2009, 10:52:15 pm
I started a thread in the Triumph section about hex bits for front wheel removal and got back several imaginative responses about how to improvise a quick solution. I thought I'd start a thread where we can share our most useful tips and tricks. What creative solutions have you come up with when working in the garage, be it tools, tool improvisation, storage, repurposed, reused, recycled goods, etc.? You know outside of the box stuff that's been of use to you and that you'd want to share with your fellow ST.Netr's. Post 'em up!

I'll start: To bleed brakes quickly, I use a 60cc cath tip syringe and some surplus tubing. Attach one end of the tubing to the syringe and the other end to the bleed valve, crack the valve and draw back on the syringe. The syringe draws fresh fluid from the reservoir and all air from the line. Tighten the valve and, voila! Brake lines completely bled and free of air. Much cheaper than buying a speed bleeder.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: squeezer on November 19, 2009, 08:21:45 am
Excellent idea for a thread, though a lot of the cooler tricks are bike specific.

Anyway, I like the syringe idea. I use a Mity-Vac for that, but the syringe would definitely be cheaper.
http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product_6970_391590_391590


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Scratch33 on November 19, 2009, 08:53:37 am

I'll start: To bleed brakes quickly, I use a 60cc cath tip syringe and some surplus tubing. Attach one end of the tubing to the syringe and the other end to the bleed valve, crack the valve and draw back on the syringe. The syringe draws fresh fluid from the reservoir and all air from the line. Tighten the valve and, voila! Brake lines completely bled and free of air. Much cheaper than buying a speed bleeder.



I do the syringe trick too, except I fill it with brake fluid and use it to push the fluid through the bleed valve up to the reservoir.  Air bubbles naturally want to travel upwards anyway.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: bomber on November 19, 2009, 09:12:01 am



I do the syringe trick too, except I fill it with brake fluid and use it to push the fluid through the bleed valve up to the reservoir.  Air bubbles naturally want to travel upwards anyway.


+ a million! This trick has let me bleed some brake lines that seemed to NEVER yield to conventional methods . . . . . . .


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: tumbler on November 19, 2009, 10:06:14 am
I balance my wheels using the axle and two jack stands. I just trued the rim on my xt225 doing this same thing, but placed a level lightly on the rim as I spun it. The wheel isn't perfect, but the rim is straight enough now that I don't feel it when I am riding.  


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: AutoXer on November 19, 2009, 12:20:52 pm



I do the syringe trick too, except I fill it with brake fluid and use it to push the fluid through the bleed valve up to the reservoir.  Air bubbles naturally want to travel upwards anyway.


Wait a minute, doesn't the fluid dump out of the reservoir and all over the place then?  

jZ



Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: McRider on November 19, 2009, 12:23:10 pm



I do the syringe trick too, except I fill it with brake fluid and use it to push the fluid through the bleed valve up to the reservoir.  Air bubbles naturally want to travel upwards anyway.


I like that idea.  I suppose if you start with the reservoir empty and push fluid until it is full, the line will automatically be bled.  Next question is, where do you get a syringe if you are not in the medical field or a junky?  How about a turkey baseter?


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Scratch33 on November 19, 2009, 12:48:31 pm

Next question is, where do you get a syringe if you are not in the medical field or a junky?  How about a turkey baseter?


I found mine from a farm supply store.  I think they're used to administer liquid vitamins and stuff to horses and livestock; not sure.  They were cheap, about $2.50 each.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: TuffguyF4i on November 19, 2009, 01:45:49 pm
This is a trick i stole from Wheeler, who runs a garage on 129 down by deals gap.

When placing a front tire back on, use the brakes to help allign the wheel and rotors
Put the wheel back on.  
Spin it, then tap the brakes.  Do this a couple times.
Then snug down the bolts on the forks and tighten the axle nut.

(edited,,,accidentally said swing arm instead of forks)


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: William on November 19, 2009, 01:49:18 pm

This is a trick i stole from Wheeler, who runs a garage on 129 down by deals gap.

When placing a front tire back on, use the brakes to help allign the wheel and rotors
Put the wheel back on.  
Spin it, then tap the brakes.  Do this a couple times.
Then snug down the bolts on the swing arm and tighten the axle nut.


Front tire, swing arm?


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: bomber on November 19, 2009, 02:09:10 pm



I like that idea.  I suppose if you start with the reservoir empty and push fluid until it is full, the line will automatically be bled.  Next question is, where do you get a syringe if you are not in the medical field or a junky?  How about a turkey baseter?


I wound up getting 6 on the interwebs for $3.50 -- gave the extras to buddies . . . . .wanted to be there when the opened the envelopes, but missed the chance.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: bomber on November 19, 2009, 02:10:01 pm



Front tire, swing arm?


clearly for the rare front center hub sterring bike . . . . .


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: rgbeard on November 19, 2009, 11:37:52 pm



clearly for the rare front center hub sterring bike . . . . .


Clearly a GTS.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: TuffguyF4i on November 20, 2009, 08:26:17 am



clearly for the rare front center hub sterring bike . . . . .


GTS?  No, an F4i.  Not a fan of the GTS even though its a cool looking bike.

Since rotors work with such tight tolerances, its a good idea to make sure everything is centered and happy before tq'ing down the bolts.  Brake calipers included.  
Things will never bolt back on exactly the same way...everything has slop in its tolerancing.  With a front tire the most important thing is that the rotors are well seated in the calipers.  At least in my opinion.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: scramblerracer123 on November 20, 2009, 08:53:44 am



Front tire, swing arm?


I think he was referring to you talking about the front tire then later said tighten the swingarm.  I assume you mean the pinch bolts on the bottom of the forks?


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Castaway on November 20, 2009, 09:02:09 am



I do the syringe trick too, except I fill it with brake fluid and use it to push the fluid through the bleed valve up to the reservoir.  Air bubbles naturally want to travel upwards anyway.


I'm still getting my head around this - I'm slow.  :o  When connecting the syringe to the bleeder, is there some volume of air present that would need to be pushed up through the lines?


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: rgbeard on November 20, 2009, 09:09:19 am
I'd be more apt to pull rather than push - just because I would HATE to overflow the reservoir and deal with the mess/damage.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: bomber on November 20, 2009, 09:21:29 am



I'm still getting my head around this - I'm slow.  :o  When connecting the syringe to the bleeder, is there some volume of air present that would need to be pushed up through the lines?


Almost certainly yes.

This technique (pushing the fluid up through the lines) is really on effective when you're starting with a dry system (rebuild component or some such) or are planning on completely changing the fluid.

Both of these situations, btw, encompass why I'd be bleeding the system anyway.

If the system isn't dry, you can use the syringe to empty the reservoir of fluid before starting. It IS a bit of a pita to remember to check the reservoir, but not much, and it does such a great job quickly that it's worth the effort, for me.

YMM, clearly, V.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Fourstring on November 20, 2009, 10:45:56 am
Stupid question-

Pushing air up through the lines, doesn't the fluid/air flow get blocked by the master cylinder?  Do you do the syringe trick with the lever engaged?

:popcorn:

Great thread.  Here's two I've found:

1.  When you replace your battery, write the date on the top in marker.  That way you always know how old it is.

2.  When putting in new spark plugs, put a section of rubber tubing over the end and screw it into the engine by turning the tubing.  If you're cross-threaded, the tube will turn but the spark plug won't, which keeps you from having to re-tap your threads.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: bomber on November 20, 2009, 10:57:29 am
With the lever released, there is a clear and open path from the bleed fitting on the caliper to the reservoir.

This allows fluid from the reservoir to reach the actual master cylinder.

When you squeeze the lever (or depress the pedal), the passage from the reservoir to the cylinder is closed. This keeps the pressure in the cylider/line/caliper, as opposed to pressurizing the reservoir.

So, no, you don't have to squeeze the lever.

Have I made that sufficiently muddy?


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: mxvet57 on November 20, 2009, 11:05:39 am

With the lever released, there is a clear and open path from the bleed fitting on the caliper to the reservoir.

This allows fluid from the reservoir to reach the actual master cylinder.

When you squeeze the lever (or depress the pedal), the passage from the reservoir to the cylinder is closed. This keeps the pressure in the cylider/line/caliper, as opposed to pressurizing the reservoir.

So, no, you don't have to squeeze the lever.

Have I made that sufficiently muddy?


any good mechanic would understand what you just said.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Fourstring on November 20, 2009, 11:13:54 am



any good mechanic would understand what you just said.


And yet, I understood it too.   :headscratch:

Here's another one I found for winterizing the bike.  Instead of 2x4s and plywood under the tires to keep them off the ground, pick up a large exercise mat from Sports Authority, like what goes under a treadmill or Bowflex.  The tires are still insulated from the concrete, and it's easier on your feet/knees the rest of the year when you're wrenching and standing all day.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: bomber on November 20, 2009, 11:18:17 am
Using a paint stick, mark the oil filter with the milage at which is should be change.

Use the same paint stick to note the tire pressures for the bike under the seat someplace (this becomes more valuable as the vehicle count in the motor pool grows).


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: squeezer on November 20, 2009, 11:45:56 am

And yet, I understood it too.   :headscratch:


 :lol: :lol: I had the same thought.


Here's another one I found for winterizing the bike.  Instead of 2x4s and plywood under the tires to keep them off the ground, pick up a large exercise mat from Sports Authority, like what goes under a treadmill or Bowflex.  The tires are still insulated from the concrete, and it's easier on your feet/knees the rest of the year when you're wrenching and standing all day.


Hey, I really like that one. It gets done this year.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: bomber on November 20, 2009, 01:20:01 pm
If you're like me, much of your riding gear lives in the garage -- some small creature reminded me of this trick for the lsst three mornings in a row by leaving an acorn in my right boot.

A drier sheet left in an enclosed area will discourage mice, rats, squirrels and the like from going into said space --

Half a sheet in each boot, one in the exit of your muffler, one in the battercompartment (I have no idea what is tasty about wiring looms, but there's seemingly something) . . . . . you get the idea . . . . .

Cheap ones work as well as spendy ones -- a trip to the dollar store may be in order.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: chornbe on November 20, 2009, 01:26:12 pm

I'd be more apt to pull rather than push - just because I would HATE to overflow the reservoir and deal with the mess/damage.


Agreed. I vacuum bleed, then pressure bleed for completeness... then do pressure bleed again the next day. You never get all the air out the first time.

On a full rebuild on a master cylinder, bench bleed it before hooking up the lines.

On a full caliper rebuild, fill the caliper with break fluid by pouring it in the hose attachment hole with the bleeder open.

The stupid Brembo-built calipers on my Harley have the bleeder and hose connection on the same hole, so I would *HAVE* to prefill the caliper anyway.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: chornbe on November 20, 2009, 01:30:03 pm
if you have a lift, get proficient at putting bikes up on it frontwards and backwards. Locking the rear wheel into the clamp (or chock of you're using one) and hoisting the front makes pulling the front apart a real snap. None of my bikes have center stands at the moment, so even getting the 800lb Harley up on the lift backwards is something you get good at out of necessity.  :thumbsup:


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: McRider on November 20, 2009, 02:06:59 pm
Paint sticks are showing up a lot on this thread.  Here's another idea to help with valve adjustment:  If you have to change a shim on a shim-under-bucket system, use a paint stick to mark the cam chain at the cam allignment marks before removing the cams.  This saves a lot of time counting pins and worry about getting the cam timing right.  I've only done this once, so I don't know how easy it would be go get the marks to allign on the next time you have to take the cams out, but you can always paint again the next time.  


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: bomber on November 20, 2009, 02:13:05 pm
Any way we can get this thread stickied?


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: bomber on November 20, 2009, 02:21:18 pm
pencil erasers clean elctrical contacts very nicely.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: chornbe on November 20, 2009, 02:24:02 pm
If you can afford a free-standing wheel chock that holds the bike vertical, or a lift, get one. Doesn't have to be the top of the line (I bought the cheapeast Harbor Freight lift and it's fine).

Cleaning, basic maintenance, body-work swaps (for you track-day guys), engine work, carb/TB syncs, pipe swaps... nearly everything that can be done with the wheels still on the bike is just easier when the bike is properly vertical.

A lift is preferable over a chock because getting the bike up to standing working height really eases fatigue and knee soreness.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Kramer on November 20, 2009, 03:24:54 pm
this may not fit here...and I know there are some who just don't do it, but...

Never wash the bike down with water UNLESS you have time t go for a ride before putting it up for the night (or longer).  The ride will rid the bike of hard to reach areas where water may collect.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: MadMax96 on November 20, 2009, 05:16:20 pm

this may not fit here...and I know there are some who just don't do it, but...

Never wash the bike down with water UNLESS you have time t go for a ride before putting it up for the night (or longer).  The ride will rid the bike of hard to reach areas where water may collect.


Unless you're one of those rich types who dropped $300 on one of those fancy blower dryer thingies...   :rolleyes:



Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: jimmy on November 20, 2009, 05:51:07 pm
After I wash it I dry my bike with my leaf blower.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Sputnik on November 23, 2009, 11:44:32 am

Agreed. I vacuum bleed, then pressure bleed for completeness... then do pressure bleed again the next day. You never get all the air out the first time.


A useful trick after bleeding / vacuum bleeding is apply pressure to the brake lever (e.g. tightly bungy the brake lever to the handlebar) overnight. The pressure will force those tiny little bubbles to the top.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: William on November 25, 2009, 05:43:46 pm
Something else I recently learned while wrenching on my KLR... Lock-Tite everything!! That thumper routinely vibrates parts loose. It's not un-common to hear fasteners falling off the bike while cruising down the road...  :rolleyes:


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Atitalongtime on November 25, 2009, 06:34:52 pm
Poor Man's Bike Lift
4 eye hooks, good size ones, 7/16" shank, screwed into the rafters of your garage.

In a square pattern, Wider than your handlebars and 6" longer than your wheelbase.

4 ratchet type tie down straps hanging down, hooked with soft straps to your bars and rear frame and you can safely jack the scoot up as high as you like.

Works great for dirt bikes, but I lifted the K12GT up and pulled both wheels without drama.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: HipGnosis on November 26, 2009, 04:18:17 pm
The foam pads (9 x 18 x 1?) they sell for gardening kneepads work good in the garage too.  Good to sit on too.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: HipGnosis on November 26, 2009, 04:21:07 pm
Non-hardening gasket sealer works as a 'shade-tree' lock-tite.  Not for nuts n bolts that actually need lock-tite, but for the ones that just need a little something.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: cultureslayer on November 26, 2009, 04:35:15 pm

Next question is, where do you get a syringe if you are not in the medical field or a junky?  How about a turkey baseter?

They are non-rx in most states, you can just walk up to the pharmacy and ask what they've got.  Farm supply stores will have them in with the animal meds too.

I have bought syringes from the pharmacy and not been given any trouble.  I'm a snob and only use the good brand ones when giving vaccines.  Farm supply store around here only carries off brand stuff and I only want to stick sharp needles into pets.  Don't mind spending an extra 10 cents, I'm already saving $20 on the vaccine.  :p


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: McRider on November 28, 2009, 06:24:39 pm
Thanks,  I found a syringe at a feed store and look forward to trying this trick when I replace my front brake pads, which will be pretty soon.  


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: William on November 30, 2009, 01:57:55 am
Center stand doesn't get one or both tires off the ground? Slip a 2x4 under your center stand for a little extra lift.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: TuffguyF4i on November 30, 2009, 12:22:52 pm
A normal battery charger hooked up to a Christmas light timer, works just fine as a battery tender.  I have mine set to charge for 10 mins/day.



Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: bomber on November 30, 2009, 12:25:55 pm
thanks for the reminder --

a normal battery charger hooked up through a tail light bulb (preferably in the positive lead) will mimic a trickle charger -- put together with teh timer tip above, you've got a pennytech alternative to a smart charger . . . .


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: chornbe on November 30, 2009, 12:29:54 pm
Less than $23?  :headscratch:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000CITK8S/ref=noref?ie=UTF8&s=automotive


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: TuffguyF4i on November 30, 2009, 12:32:11 pm
I hate having duplicate tools....plenty of other things to spend my money on.

Plus, there is some debate on whether the tender is actually the best option for batteries.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: bomber on November 30, 2009, 01:31:09 pm

Less than $23?  :headscratch:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000CITK8S/ref=noref?ie=UTF8&s=automotive


if you've already got the regular charger, and the timer, you bet! ;-}

otherwise, not such a bargain, clearly.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Papa Lazarou on December 03, 2009, 09:34:40 am
WD 40 removes grease and chain wax.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Leanintree on December 03, 2009, 12:08:09 pm
Harbor Freight has a number of universal motorcycle tools and accessories available for DIRT CHEAP.
Harbor Freight Moto-buys (http://search.harborfreight.com/cpisearch/web/search.do?catPath=All%2BProducts%252F%252F%252F%252FUserSearch%253Dmotorcycle¤tPage=1&lastPage=3&isNext=true&isPrevious=false&category=&attributeValue=&attributeName=&requestedPage=1&resultsPerPage=30&resultsPerPageBottom=30)

Including

Lift spools- $5 (2 sizes even!)
(http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/photos//66900-66999/66926-t.gif)

Cheapo Float chargers- $10
(http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/photos//42200-42299/42292-t.gif)

Rear stands- $40
(http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/photos//66100-66199/66192-t.gif)

Fork adapters for rear stand- $10
(http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/photos//65600-65699/65621-t.gif)

Wheel balancers- $60
(http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/photos//98400-98499/98488-t.gif)

Balancer adapters for VFR/Ducati/BMW $2-$20

HF has become a VERY Motorcycle friendly place... for stuff that your garage needs for your bike!

Leanintree


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: chornbe on December 03, 2009, 01:02:30 pm
I just bought bearings and 'axle' shaft to make my own balance stand. But for that $60, I'll just snag one. Finding the cones was becoming tiresome. Of course, after the first of the year I'm going to be hawking Dyna Beads officially.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: MacGyver on December 04, 2009, 12:33:36 am
Want to siphon the gas out of your bikes tank and all you have is a hose?  Don't have a handy dandy electric pump or time to fiddle with a hand pump? Don't feel like gargling 87 octane?  :crazy:

Insert a basic 3/8 to 1/2 inch hose into the gas tank through the fill hole. Make sure that end of the hose is submerged.
This works best if you have an air compressor with an air gun nozzle. Blast a steady airstream from the air nozzle across the non submerged end of the hose at a 30 degree angle from parallel. (Aim everything at the ground) Don't hold down the air too long or you will make an air/gasoline fog mixture that could spell trouble if you are smoking.  Should only take 2 or 3 seconds of air to start a siphon.

Let gravity do the rest of the work.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: kevin_stevens on December 04, 2009, 12:44:35 am
Easier method:

Wrap a plastic bag around the siphon tube and over the tank filler with your hand.  Blow into the other end of the tube.  Stop blowing and place the end in the destination container.  Pressure from the tank will force the fuel over the "hump" and start the siphon.

KeS


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Justin on December 04, 2009, 02:12:33 am

Harbor Freight has a number of universal motorcycle tools and accessories available for DIRT CHEAP.
Harbor Freight Moto-buys (http://search.harborfreight.com/cpisearch/web/search.do?catPath=All%2BProducts%252F%252F%252F%252FUserSearch%253Dmotorcycle¤tPage=1&lastPage=3&isNext=true&isPrevious=false&category=&attributeValue=&attributeName=&requestedPage=1&resultsPerPage=30&resultsPerPageBottom=30)

Including

Lift spools- $5 (2 sizes even!)
(http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/photos//66900-66999/66926-t.gif)

Cheapo Float chargers- $10
(http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/photos//42200-42299/42292-t.gif)

Rear stands- $40
(http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/photos//66100-66199/66192-t.gif)

Fork adapters for rear stand- $10
(http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/photos//65600-65699/65621-t.gif)

Wheel balancers- $60
(http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/photos//98400-98499/98488-t.gif)

Balancer adapters for VFR/Ducati/BMW $2-$20

HF has become a VERY Motorcycle friendly place... for stuff that your garage needs for your bike!

Leanintree


I have the spools.. a great bargain, and the stand - works great! I've heard their trickle charges are garbage though.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: richak on December 04, 2009, 02:20:03 am
The wheel balancer looks to be the same as one I bought from Dennis Kirk or maybe J&P Cycle. It works great and Harbor's price is better.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: William on December 04, 2009, 10:22:27 pm
Need the perfect file handle? Drill a hole in a golf ball sized to about mid point in the file tang -- drive the file into the golf ball. Perfect hand size and golf balls are free if you know where to look...  ;)


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: William on December 04, 2009, 10:28:57 pm
More contributions...  :cool:

An old fold up ironing board works great as a paint bench. The kind with an expanded metal work-top, so you can hang small parts from it. Folds up tight, is very MOBILE. Paint anywhere you want, over-spray on the bushes is O.K. They also hold a decent amount of weight. It should have alot of paint on it, so leave it outside because it won't rust!
Throw some towels on it when your work bench is "full", and clean your guns!
Cheap at yard sales, just pull all that padding off, and play with the krylon ect...


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Atitalongtime on December 05, 2009, 12:39:04 am

More contributions...  :cool:

An old fold up ironing board works great as a paint bench. The kind with an expanded metal work-top, so you can hang small parts from it. Folds up tight, is very MOBILE. Paint anywhere you want, over-spray on the bushes is O.K. They also hold a decent amount of weight. It should have alot of paint on it, so leave it outside because it won't rust!
Throw some towels on it when your work bench is "full", and clean your guns!
Cheap at yard sales, just pull all that padding off, and play with the krylon ect...




I Like IT!
Betty Lou hasn't used hers sine the honeymoon...
unfortunatly, that's not the only thing she's hasn't used :( :(


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: bomber on December 05, 2009, 10:44:56 am

Need the perfect file handle? Drill a hole in a golf ball sized to about mid point in the file tang -- drive the file into the golf ball. Perfect hand size and golf balls are free if you know where to look...  ;)


This is a great tip --

be careful though -- some golf balls have a liquid center -- said liquid is often highly pressurized --- no need to ask how I know.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: William on December 05, 2009, 12:09:49 pm



This is a great tip --

be careful though -- some golf balls have a liquid center -- said liquid is often highly pressurized --- no need to ask how I know.


Good point. I didn't consider that. I guess I'm lucky that I've been using the "cheap" range balls.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: kevin_stevens on December 06, 2009, 01:47:03 am



This is a great tip --

be careful though -- some golf balls have a liquid center -- said liquid is often highly pressurized --- no need to ask how I know.


How many licks does it take?   :lol:

KeS


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: William on December 15, 2009, 12:23:24 am
Been stuck on the side of the road with an odd-size wrench that's not precisely the one you need to fix the problem? The solution is in your pocket...a quarter, dime, nickel, etc. can make an oversize wrench fit the bolt you desperately need to turn by taking up the excess slack. Sloppy, but effective.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: TuffguyF4i on December 15, 2009, 09:24:17 am

Been stuck on the side of the road with an odd-size wrench that's not precisely the one you need to fix the problem? The solution is in your pocket...a quarter, dime, nickel, etc. can make an oversize wrench fit the bolt you desperately need to turn by taking up the excess slack. Sloppy, but effective.



I've used rocks and sand before.   :lol:


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: William on December 30, 2009, 11:10:26 pm
If you have to hold a nut where your fingers can't reach and a socket or box wrench won't fit either, a dab of grease or wrap of tape on the end of a standard screwdriver will hold the nut in place and is slim enough to get the nut where it's needed.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Mastros2 on December 31, 2009, 08:39:48 am

Been stuck on the side of the road with an odd-size wrench that's not precisely the one you need to fix the problem? The solution is in your pocket...a quarter, dime, nickel, etc. can make an oversize wrench fit the bolt you desperately need to turn by taking up the excess slack. Sloppy, but effective.


I like this one!  Thanks all for the great ideas everyone!


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: TuffguyF4i on January 01, 2010, 11:47:57 am
You can remove a frozen/locktite/stripped bolt using a hardened chisel.  9 times out of 10 it will move the bolt.  
It helps to first wack the bolt with a machinists hammer made of a softer material.  


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Andrew on January 01, 2010, 12:10:16 pm
Heat will release the grip of locktight

Playing with fire can be fun and productive


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Leanintree on January 01, 2010, 01:09:57 pm

Heat will release the grip of locktight

Playing with fire can be fun and productive


If you can't put fire to that one fastener that won't come loose, use a soldering gun applied to a screw/bolthead to heat it precisely.

LT


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Leanintree on January 01, 2010, 01:12:03 pm
Freeze bearings to shrink them before press fitting. Likewise, freeze shafts that need pressed into bearings.

LT


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Andrew on January 02, 2010, 09:00:39 pm



If you can't put fire to that one fastener that won't come loose, use a soldering gun applied to a screw/bolthead to heat it precisely.

LT


Very good advise, but looses all the fun of playing with fire :firedevil:


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: TuffguyF4i on January 03, 2010, 07:02:19 pm



If you can't put fire to that one fastener that won't come loose, use a soldering gun applied to a screw/bolthead to heat it precisely.

LT


Small cheap torch cigar lighters are awesome around the garage.  :)


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Sputnik on January 16, 2010, 09:45:15 pm
changed the fork oil on my Bandit today.

The usual method (as per shop manual) is to overfill the fork tubes, pump a few times to eliminate bubbles, etc, and then  use a special too to suck out the excess oil to the recommended oil height.

You can buy the specialty Suzuki fork oil level tool (probably some outrageous price). Or you can get one from Motion Pro like this:
http://www.motionpro.com/motorcycle/tools/category/fork_oil_level_gauge/

OR you can make your own for free....

This works perfectly:

Instructions:
1) go to your bathroom and find some large bottle of shampoo or conditioner that has a "pumper" lid with a  "stiff" plastic tube attached (e.g the type of big bottles of cheapy stuff like Pert Plus that you get at Costco). Steal the pumper lid and tube, leaving the wife's shampoo without a lid.

2) Go to you kids room and steal an old  hockey puck.

3) drill a hole in the centre of the hockey puck. Size the hole so that the pumper tube will be a tight/snug fit but still allow some movement for the tube if it is pushed hard. My pumer tube was about 1/4 OD so my hole was 1/4 inch.

4) Slide the pumper tube into the hockey puck and adjust the length of tube on the bottom side to the fork oil height recommended for you bike. Bandit 1200S is 107mm.

5) Place on top of fork tubes and use the little pumper to suck out excess oil into a conatiner.

Photos:




Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: chornbe on January 17, 2010, 08:50:39 am
I like this.

I picked up a whole box of various-sized rubber plugs at sears hardware one time, and I have some that would work perfectly in place of the puck. Nice setup.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: bomber on January 18, 2010, 09:46:08 am


Instructions:

Steal the pumper lid and tube, leaving the wife's shampoo without a lid.



Adapt and overcome! What a great, well thought out tip! The only step missing is a bullet list of suggested comebacks for use when you are busted for stealing the pump!


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Sputnik on January 18, 2010, 10:13:23 am



Adapt and overcome! What a great, well thought out tip! The only step missing is a bullet list of suggested comebacks for use when you are busted for stealing the pump!


Only one bullet:
  • look stupid and mumble some mealy-mouthed comment while walking away.



Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: bomber on January 18, 2010, 11:05:35 am



Only one bullet:
  • look stupid and mumble some mealy-mouthed comment while walking away.




Great -- I already know how to do that!


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: bomber on January 19, 2010, 09:42:09 am
Got an oil (or coolant) leak, the source of which eludes you like the source of the Nile hid from Livingstone?

Go the the drug store, buy a can of generic, cheap athlete's foot aerosol powder.

Go home, clean the bike (or at least the affected area).

Spray the athlete's foot powder onto the area you suspect is the source of the spooge (the powder is white).

Ride the bike, inspect the powdered area -- the source of the leak should become instantly obvious.

Note Bene -- airflow around parts of motorcycles is sometimes not in the direction you think it will be -- the source of the spooge could easily be aft of the mess it leaves, or to the left, rather than in front of the mess.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: David Morrow on January 19, 2010, 09:14:46 pm
Back to brake bleeding... after I installed my SS brake lines, my front lines felt like there was still air trapped.

I made a rubber backed plate to fit over top of the reservoir. I attached a Mity-vac, applied some vacuum, and then pumped the lever in and out. I did this several times. The front brake feels like it's on Viagara now. And, I wasted no brake fluid in the process because I was only pumping air.


(http://www.ldrider.ca/webphotos/brake-plate-1.JPG)



(http://www.ldrider.ca/webphotos/brake-plate-2.JPG)


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: tjhess74 on January 21, 2010, 10:29:51 am

changed the fork oil on my Bandit today.

The usual method (as per shop manual) is to overfill the fork tubes, pump a few times to eliminate bubbles, etc, and then  use a special too to suck out the excess oil to the recommended oil height.

You can buy the specialty Suzuki fork oil level tool (probably some outrageous price). Or you can get one from Motion Pro like this:
http://www.motionpro.com/motorcycle/tools/category/fork_oil_level_gauge/

OR you can make your own for free....

This works perfectly:

Instructions:
1) go to your bathroom and find some large bottle of shampoo or conditioner that has a "pumper" lid with a  "stiff" plastic tube attached (e.g the type of big bottles of cheapy stuff like Pert Plus that you get at Costco). Steal the pumper lid and tube, leaving the wife's shampoo without a lid.

2) Go to you kids room and steal an old  hockey puck.

3) drill a hole in the centre of the hockey puck. Size the hole so that the pumper tube will be a tight/snug fit but still allow some movement for the tube if it is pushed hard. My pumer tube was about 1/4 OD so my hole was 1/4 inch.

4) Slide the pumper tube into the hockey puck and adjust the length of tube on the bottom side to the fork oil height recommended for you bike. Bandit 1200S is 107mm.

5) Place on top of fork tubes and use the little pumper to suck out excess oil into a conatiner.



another method, slightly easier for those of us with out kids that play hockey...

go to any store that sells pets and get some clear air-line tubing for aquariums.  then stop by any store that sells beauty supplies and get a semi transparent squeeze bottle (a few ounces or better) with a screw on lid that has a pointed tip.  many of the bottles have graduated measurements marked on the sides.

attach a length of said hose to the nipple of said bottle.  then take the mm measurement for fluid (see your service manual) and transfer that measurement starting at the end of the hose.  

then fill your forks, cycle to flush air, then stick the hose into the fork until you reach the premeasured mark.  then simply squeeze the bottle and release.  the process will suck out the excess fluid and will start to suck air when its at the proper level.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Sputnik on January 21, 2010, 11:25:51 am



another method, slightly easier for those of us with out kids that play hockey...

go to any store that sells pets and get some clear air-line tubing for aquariums.  then stop by any store that sells beauty supplies and get a semi transparent squeeze bottle (a few ounces or better) with a screw on lid that has a pointed tip.  many of the bottles have graduated measurements marked on the sides.

attach a length of said hose to the nipple of said bottle.  then take the mm measurement for fluid (see your service manual) and transfer that measurement starting at the end of the hose.  

then fill your forks, cycle to flush air, then stick the hose into the fork until you reach the premeasured mark.  then simply squeeze the bottle and release.  the process will suck out the excess fluid and will start to suck air when its at the proper level.


True, there are many ways of doing the same thing. But I'm not sure why you need a bottle with measurements on the side if the only thing that determines how much oil is being sucked out is how far into the fork you insert the fish tank tubing. I would also be hesitant to use fish tank tubing because it is too flexible, and if it curves inside the fork tube will create error in terms of how much oil is sucked out.
BTW, a hockey puck is not essential. You could use anything that is large enough to sit flat on top of the fork tube but still thick enough to hold sucker the tube firmly and maintain the tube in a vertical position (e.g. a small piece of plywood, or piece of 2x4, etc.) .
I've also hear of people using a turkey baster, or connecting fish tank tubing to a piece of wire coat hanger and then using their mity-vac to suck out oil.

It's interesting to see how people innovate in different ways to create various tools and jigs.
There are plenty of uses for hockey pucks, and I'm always intrigued at the different ways they are used. E.g. sidestand support, vibration isolators under you compressor, etc.

Maybe we need a new thread on the myriad uses of hockey pucks in your garage / workshop.
 :lol:






Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: tjhess74 on January 29, 2010, 07:16:42 pm
i dig the puck idea.  i think its weight and size is perfect for the job.  yours only requires one-hand operation, whereas mine takes two.

the graduated marks arent important for the removal of excess fork fluid, its just an added benefit for when you use it in the garage for other measured fluid jobs.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: tvpierce on February 03, 2010, 01:28:47 pm

Back to brake bleeding... after I installed my SS brake lines, my front lines felt like there was still air trapped.

I made a rubber backed plate to fit over top of the reservoir. I attached a Mity-vac, applied some vacuum, and then pumped the lever in and out. I did this several times. The front brake feels like it's on Viagara now. And, I wasted no brake fluid in the process because I was only pumping air.


David,

That's brilliant!

Thanks.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Papa Lazarou on February 03, 2010, 02:48:25 pm
WHY ISN'T THIS THREAD A STICKY?


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Leanintree on February 03, 2010, 03:20:42 pm
Because the signal to noise ratio is still high grasshopper...
(http://www.whataboutclients.com/archives/kung-fu.jpg)

Oh, and a bajillion lit candles in your garage makes it into a potential fire hazard (particularly when you use flammable chemicals).  <--------TIP

LT


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: William on February 03, 2010, 03:42:28 pm
Oil change tip... Keep an empty 5 qt oil jug in the garage and mark with permanent pen the proper amount of oil for each of the bikes you own. Measure out the oil for your bike into the jug, and mark the level, label that mark for that bike. Repeat for each of the machines you own, so that at each oil change you fill to that mark for that bike and pour into the engine. That way you're really only doing a precise measure once. I've got marks for changes with and without filters.  :thumbsup:


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: chornbe on February 03, 2010, 05:37:18 pm

Oil change tip... Keep an empty 5 qt oil jug in the garage and mark with permanent pen the proper amount of oil for each of the bikes you own. Measure out the oil for your bike into the jug, and mark the level, label that mark for that bike. Repeat for each of the machines you own, so that at each oil change you fill to that mark for that bike and pour into the engine. That way you're really only doing a precise measure once. I've got marks for changes with and without filters.  :thumbsup:


I do this. It's worth the few extra minutes.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: knolltop314 on February 03, 2010, 06:20:48 pm
William ...... THANKS!   :thumbsup:


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: bomber on February 03, 2010, 06:27:18 pm
(cue V8 head slpping loop here)

Good tip, William -- I learned something today.

Must be time to lay down.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: knolltop314 on February 03, 2010, 06:55:04 pm

(cue V8 head slpping loop here)

Good tip, William -- I learned something today.

Must be time to lay down.

So u need the nap today, huh?   :sleepy: :sleepy:


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: bomber on February 03, 2010, 09:42:49 pm
;-}


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: HipGnosis on February 07, 2010, 06:50:45 pm
Speaking of oil changes.

My maint logs are now on the computer (surprise!).
My log files for ea vehicle have notes on:  oil viscosity, how much (w/ and w/o filter), filter #s and a list of all the tools needed.

It's so much easier to grab all the right tools (and only the right tools) from the start.

Bonus tip; putting lotion on your hands before you do any mechanical work makes clean up a lot easier.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Andrew on February 07, 2010, 10:50:43 pm
When doing a valve adj/check write down the clearances (or put it on the computer)
When you go back to recheck them the next time it is a lot easier to track the changes.

If you have shims and have to remove the cam/cams to pull them, measure all of them and put the info in the log. If they are out next check you will not have to pull things further apart just to find out what shim you will need. From the notes you made you can determine the correct size needed. Saves a bit of time.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: chornbe on February 08, 2010, 06:46:36 am
These are among the things for which a helper is a great time saver. If you have, say, a teenager interested in learning, you can explain to him/her exactly what you're checking and why, and he can write down what you dictate, while you keep working. He can also take pictures if you're the type to do a picture log. I usually am if it's a job that I'd like to share or the first time I'm doing something new, or the first time I'm doing a job on a bike I've never done that job on before.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Sputnik on February 08, 2010, 07:11:17 pm

....If you have, say, a teenager interested in learning.....

Oxymoron  :lol:
At least with the 2 I have left at home.



Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: William on February 12, 2010, 07:18:14 pm
For a little extra grip on your ratchet extensions, wrap some grip tape around the shaft. Helps when you need to turn the extension without a ratchet...


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Andrew on February 12, 2010, 10:12:58 pm
Grip tape around the shaft :eek:

  Sounds painful   :rolleyes:


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: HipGnosis on February 15, 2010, 07:08:21 pm
When dealing with a stubborn bolt or nut,  sometimes it helps to apply force the opposite way of the way you need it to go.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: TuffguyF4i on February 15, 2010, 08:11:57 pm
I keep all of my maint records with a sharpie on the wall of my garage.  

Its not super neat but when someone comes to buy a bike, they def believe i do all the required maintenance.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: bomber on February 16, 2010, 09:24:56 am
YAY, this thread's stickied!


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Papa Lazarou on February 16, 2010, 02:33:05 pm

YAY, this thread's stickied!


 :thumbsup:


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: William on February 17, 2010, 11:09:55 pm

Grip tape around the shaft :eek:

  Sounds painful   :rolleyes:


It's more comfortable than you'd expect at first...

On topic:

Don't throw out that old baking sheet or cooking pot from the kitchen.

They make excllent trays to disassemble stuff in to catch little parts falling off and to keep fasteners from wandering off the edge of the workbench as you keep working.

And they make nice durable parts cleaning containers. I keep several shapes & sizes handy along with a huge collection of cleaning brushes. Lots less wasted solvent.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: William on February 18, 2010, 06:54:26 pm
I stole this idea from a friend. And it works great for me since I've several rosemary plants at the house...

The smell gasoline smell seems impossible to completely remove off my hands. After a good washing, I just pull a sprig of Rosemary off the bush in the yard and roll it around my hands. Lemon peels work well too.

Thanks Tony!!!


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Andrew on February 18, 2010, 10:38:00 pm
Yep Orange or lemon peals work wonders at soaking up the smell of Gas or solvent :thumbsup:


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: chornbe on February 19, 2010, 06:39:09 am
*nods* That's why citrus cleaners and orange Gojo are so popular.  :thumbsup:

A few small, obvious things:

* I use a separate funnel for clean and waste oil.

* I use old Hawaiian Punch bottles for waste oil, antifreeze, etc, when I don't have spare oil bottles.

* The oil recycler is on the way to work. Convenience overcomes laziness and forgetfulness.

* Write down each tool you use the first time you work on a new-to-you bike, or the first time you need a specific tool. You can use this list to build a tool pack of quality tools specific to your bike. The OEM tools are typically worthless beyond the shock adjuster (if equipped) and the spark plug socket.

* If it's cold out, leave the tires inside the house over night the day before you're changing them. Goes easier.

* ONLY use hand tools (vs. electric or air powered tools) on disassembly of critical systems like wheels, forks, etc., so that you can tell if things have de-torqued over time. If they have, replace the fasteners immediately. Torque to spec on reassembly (duh!) Over-torqued fasteners is a leading cause of stripped threads, ruined fasteners and things that mysteriously loosen up for no apparent reason.

* For you Harley owners, buy T27 bits by the bushel. They are easy to lose. DAMHIK.

* Double up on common-sized wrenches. You'll need them. Unlike many SAE bolt-nut combinations ( 1/2" bolt head with 9/16" nut size), most metric fasteners are the same size for nut and bolt head.

* If you've got a wheel that's just chronically difficult to balance when you put tires on, go ahead and static balance it sans tire. You'll likely find the wheel itself is WAY out. The rear wheel on my FJR was like this, and pretty bad.

And quite possibly the most important two tips:

* Don't be lazy at the end of the job. The job's not done 'til the cleanup is done.

* Take care of your tools and your tools will take care of you. Wipe them down and inspect them before putting them away. And don't forget ratchet maintenance.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Dutch on February 19, 2010, 07:24:36 am
Use your bikes tool kit when you work on your bike.
It won't take long and your kit will evolve to something you can actually use.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: William on February 22, 2010, 11:11:47 pm


And quite possibly the most important two tips:

* Don't be lazy at the end of the job. The job's not done 'til the cleanup is done.

* Take care of your tools and your tools will take care of you. Wipe them down and inspect them before putting them away. And don't forget ratchet maintenance.


Great post, Chris. My father blessed me with these two bits of wisdom, and this one:

* Do no harm.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: mxvet57 on February 22, 2010, 11:58:51 pm
I was rebuilding the forks on a 88 EX500. when i went to grab the fork seal driver and found out it was to big. the forks were 35mm and the smallest driver i had was 42mm. what to do? :headscratch:  

I grabbed one of the seals and headed to home depot. went to the plumbing dept and found a galvanised pipe  the same diameter as the seal. make shire you get it long enough so you can hold it when driving the seal. . when i got home i took one end to the grinder and and grinded down the threads b/c it wouldn't hit the outer tube.

It only cost me $4.00 and i didn't have to spend $$$ for a seal driver for only a one time use.

(http://i120.photobucket.com/albums/o187/mxvet57/POSTING%20PICKS/100_7468.jpg)

(http://i120.photobucket.com/albums/o187/mxvet57/POSTING%20PICKS/100_7470.jpg)


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: chornbe on February 25, 2010, 10:35:00 am
*nods* I used PVC pipe for the same purpose.  :thumbsup:


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: mxvet57 on February 25, 2010, 09:37:55 pm

*nods* I used PVC pipe for the same purpose.  :thumbsup:


nice thing about the pipe is more driving mass. and did i ever need it. the seal was not cooperating.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: William on February 26, 2010, 11:27:19 am
Stole this from another thread on another website. I like the idea and will have to give it a try...

Quote
PVC pipe makes an excellent gasket scraper. If you have a miter saw with a sharp blade, just cut the end square, and the edge of the pipe will be surprisingly sharp, but it won't hurt the metal surface. It still takes some patience to get everything removed because you can only scrape very small areas at a time, but I found it much less frustrating than a plastic putty knife, and much less scary than using a metal scraper. Some other nice things about using PVC pipe: they tend to hold static electricity so scraps of gasket tend to stick to them instead of falling into nooks and crannies; when one part of the edge gets gummed up with gasket just turn it a little for a clean piece of scraping surface; when the whole thing gets dull just trim a millimeter or so off the end with the saw. I cut mine about 8" or 9" long, and use pipe with about 1.5" outside diameter though I may get some smaller for use in tighter areas.
Quote


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: TuffguyF4i on March 04, 2010, 12:23:53 pm
I always use a new razor blade to scrape case gaskets.  Then finish with a stone.  

Just remember, a good seal doesn't mean a perfect surface.  You want the gasket to have a surface it can sink into, on a microfinish level.  You do not want a mirror/perfect surface since the two cases are also never perfectly parallel.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: William on March 11, 2010, 02:35:20 pm
Scratched or hazed plastic headlight lens, etc.? Use regular white Colgate toothpaste to buff out the plastic lens. It's cheaper than buying dedicated plastic lens polish, leaves your plastic parts minty fresh, and does double duty by helping to maintain your periodontal health.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: boogeyman on March 22, 2010, 02:05:52 pm
I've found that brake cleaner will revitalize the glue on many items.  For example there are little covers on my seat tray that have double sided tape on them.  One popped off.  Spray a little brake cleaner on a paper towel, not too much, wipe the dirt off the glue, wait for tackiness, reapply.   Done this a couple times and it hasn't let me down yet.  No, I don't have a KLR!


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: William on March 24, 2010, 05:57:44 pm
I heard this one this morning on http://www.staceydavid.com/.

If you lose a small part and you can get a vacuum to the area of the part but not your hand, you take some panty hose/stockings (not your special ones), let the vacuum suck up some of the hose, hold the rest, then go after the part. The panty hose will act as a net, and will catch the part. Turn off the vacuum and grab the part.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: chornbe on March 25, 2010, 07:09:20 am

I heard this one this morning on http://www.staceydavid.com/.

If you lose a small part and you can get a vacuum to the area of the part but not your hand, you take some panty hose/stockings (not your special ones), let the vacuum suck up some of the hose, hold the rest, then go after the part. The panty hose will act as a net, and will catch the part. Turn off the vacuum and grab the part.


This has saved me once or twice over the years.  :thumbsup:

Stick a piece of black tape or masking tape across the head of a bolt to snug it into a socket a little tighter if you need to feed it into a difficult-to-get-to hole and it keeps falling out the socket.



Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: mxvet57 on March 27, 2010, 10:00:38 pm

I heard this one this morning on http://www.staceydavid.com/.

If you lose a small part and you can get a vacuum to the area of the part but not your hand, you take some panty hose/stockings (not your special ones), let the vacuum suck up some of the hose, hold the rest, then go after the part. The panty hose will act as a net, and will catch the part. Turn off the vacuum and grab the part.


forgot all about that one. thanks for reminding me again


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Steve-H on April 15, 2010, 11:38:16 am
This is good stuff  :thumbsup:


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: William on April 22, 2010, 09:12:35 pm
I'm sure you all know how to double up combination wrenches for extra leverage...  :thumbsup:
This has been invaluble to me over the years.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: boogeyman on May 18, 2010, 07:43:12 am
Stuck oil filter removal:  When everything else has failed and you don't want a mess or destroy the filter using pliers or a screwdriver, try a metal worm gear hose clamp on the filter and use a nut driver or wrench for leverage.  Worked for me once anyway.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: HipGnosis on June 10, 2010, 02:41:52 pm
To give credit where due:
The key with GoJo is to let it soak in.  It's not soap, it's petrolium based... so it will disolve petrolium products -- but it needs time.
If you just rub it on your hands for 30 seconds then rinse it off, it won't do squat.  Continually rub it into your hands for 3 - 4 minutes, and it will remove just about anything.  If it's not turning into a liquid and dripping off your hands, you're not rubbing it in long enough.



Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: HipGnosis on June 10, 2010, 02:48:41 pm
* Write down each tool you use the first time you work on a new-to-you bike, or the first time you need a specific tool. You can use this list to build a tool pack of quality tools specific to your bike.  

It also makes maintenance much easier when you can grab all the tools you need in 1 trip to the tool box.
I keep a list of the tools needed for ea maint. job on ea vehicle in the same file I use to record when the maintenance was done.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: HipGnosis on June 10, 2010, 02:55:08 pm
* If you've got a wheel that's just chronically difficult to balance when you put tires on, go ahead and static balance it sans tire. You'll likely find the wheel itself is WAY out. The rear wheel on my FJR was like this, and pretty bad.

Then mark the heavy spot of the wheel so you can align the light dot of new tires to it.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Mr.Black on June 10, 2010, 08:53:19 pm
When changing the oil on the Bandit I Take 4 pieces of tinfoil, fold them in half and layer them back to front over the exhaust and up the header. When done, clean up is quick and there is little to no oil from the filter left to burn on the pipe. Sounds pretty obvious but I don't recall seeing it here.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: TimmyG on September 13, 2010, 01:11:18 am
i have used a sparkplug socket fliped backwards and using the ext to remove axles when you dont have the right allen key


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: BadAssRX-7 on September 19, 2010, 03:08:46 am
a few tips/ tricks.  vinager is a fast and cheap sub for pb blaster or wd. it will free up rusted parts in no time. I got a thin plastic mat at walmart and slip it inside the belly pan when doing oik and filter changes on my zzr. all the oil falls to the plastic and then drains to the rear of the bike(dont forget the catch pan).
Fot the underbucket shims (should work on others also) when checking and reshimming the valves I have a program on my laptop that u enter the exsisting shim, your goal (spec)  and the size feeler guage u used. it spits out the new shim size you need to install. I can give it out if anybody wants it. its a excel (xls) format, and i have a pdf sheet i print off that i can log the shim, fleer guage size ect. its a pdf


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: C 4 on September 19, 2010, 11:19:20 am

 I have a program on my laptop that u enter the exsisting shim, your goal (spec)  and the size feeler guage u used. it spits out the new shim size you need to install. I can give it out if anybody wants it. its a excel (xls) format, and i have a pdf sheet i print off that i can log the shim, fleer guage size ect. its a pdf


I would like to have this program if possible. I need to do my valves soon. Thx


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: HipGnosis on September 22, 2010, 11:06:29 am
I got a thin plastic mat at walmart and slip it inside the belly pan when doing oik and filter changes on my zzr. all the oil falls to the plastic and then drains to the rear of the bike(dont forget the catch pan).
You can get 'flexible cutting boards' at the dollar store(s) now.
I use one to protect the rear tire when oiling my chain.
They're also good for working on delicate items as they are clean (if you don't use it to 'aqua-duct' your used oil) and for sorting thru bolts & nuts; dump em out on the mat, sort thru, roll up the board/mat to lift and funnel them back into coffee can.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Mrs. DantesDame on September 22, 2010, 11:56:47 am


They're also good for working on delicate items as they are clean (if you don't use it to 'aqua-duct' your used oil) and for sorting thru bolts & nuts; dump em out on the mat, sort thru, roll up the board/mat to lift and funnel them back into coffee can.


I like that one  :thumbsup:


Title: Sticky Tube Trick...
Post by: William on January 14, 2011, 06:22:07 pm
Stole this tip from another thread similiar to this on another forum...

Need to grab hold of a polished shaft without damaging it? Something like a shock shaft or a fork leg?

You need the Sticky Rubber Trick!

1) Cut out a long rectangle of rubber from an old inner tube. Enough to go around the object several times.

2) Spritz the rubber with brake or carb cleaner and quickly wipe off the powder and other gunk. You need the rubber to be fairly clean. (Clean the object you're clamping while you're at it.)

3) Spritz it again, and let the solvent soak in a bit, making the rubber sorta sticky.

4) Wrap the rubber tightly around said shiny object several times.

5) Clamp around the thick rubber glob using whatever abusive method works best -- Vice grips, vice, etc.

6) Marvel as the sticky rubber gives plenty of traction to keep the part from rotating or moving, yet the layers of rubber protect it from the jaws of the securing device.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Leanintree on January 14, 2011, 09:52:19 pm

Put bearings in the oven before press fitting.
The second half was right.
Fixed. :cool:

Love the Nickle trick to make a wrench fit.


Different applications. I was thinking of wheel bearings on bikes (sealed units pressing into wheel cups). All depends on what needs to be smaller (that's what goes into the freezer).
LT


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Wistrick on February 02, 2011, 12:28:33 pm
A plastic wire tie folded in half can be used to push a battery nut up where u can get a thread started...Also holds it in place......



Dan


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Papa Lazarou on February 02, 2011, 02:28:56 pm

A plastic wire tie folded in half can be used to push a battery nut up where u can get a thread started...Also holds it in place......



Dan


Me, I use a bit of grease. But then, that works for everything.  ;)


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Bowtie76 on February 02, 2011, 05:01:54 pm
When trying to remove rusted philips head screws (i.e. carb screws) tap the top of the screwdriver with a hammer while loosening.  Works every time, like an impact screwdriver  :lol:


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Papa Lazarou on February 04, 2011, 02:38:02 pm

When trying to remove rusted philips head screws (i.e. carb screws) tap the top of the screwdriver with a hammer while loosening.  Works every time, like an impact screwdriver  :lol:


A big hammer always works.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: black hills on February 04, 2011, 02:42:53 pm



Me, I use a bit of grease. But then, that works for everything.  ;)


I buy a few springs @ the hardare store and place them under the nut, they stay there for the life of the battery and you never have to worry about it :)


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: MadMax96 on February 04, 2011, 04:05:49 pm



I buy a few springs @ the hardare store and place them under the nut, they stay there for the life of the battery and you never have to worry about it :)


That sounds like a good idea too.  The best tips and tricks are ones that will use stuff you already have laying around.   :bigok:


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: black hills on February 04, 2011, 04:53:41 pm



That sounds like a good idea too.  The best tips and tricks are ones that will use stuff you already have laying around.   :bigok:


that's how it started, was looking for something to stick under the nut and there was a spring layingon my bench. worked so good I bought several more :)


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: mxvet57 on February 04, 2011, 10:38:45 pm



I buy a few springs @ the hardare store and place them under the nut, they stay there for the life of the battery and you never have to worry about it :)


Why couldn't you of posted this up 4 days ago. i was putting the battery back in my snowmobile and it wasn't easy holding the battery and a flat blade screwdriver to hold the nut and trying to turn the bolt with a nother screwdriver.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: TuffguyF4i on April 12, 2011, 03:59:43 pm
If you wrap an oil filter in sandpaper, you can grip it to get it off.  Works great to get the oil filter back on too!  

No leaks yet, so i know i'm getting it tight enough.  


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Scratch33 on April 13, 2011, 06:52:31 am
Spring Reattachment

Last weekend I had to reinstall the SW Motech center stand on my SV650 after upgrading the rear shock. This center stand has two springs, one inside the other - a real b*tch to reattach. Lacking a helping hand, I used a ratcheting tie-down strap instead.

First I put the bike in gear and blocked the wheels so it wouldn't roll or slide backwards. I hooked one end of the strap to the trailer hitch on my SUV (any solid anchor point will do). I hooked the other end of the strap directly to the springs, then just ratcheted the strap until the springs were stretched back far enough to reach their notch on the center stand plate.

I used some pliers to guide the springs' hooks down into the notch, then released the tension on the strap. Worked like a charm.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: hpc800 on May 25, 2011, 10:03:03 pm
Like others have mentioned, my OEM tool kit has grown and has better tools. So to store them I grabbed a leftover Lay's Stax potato chip container and they all fit and it is very durable. It is made out of plastic w/snap lid...not cardboard tube like Pringles container. I just toss it in the trunk of the bike and it has come in handy for me and my riding buddies. :popcorn: :popcorn:


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: mxvet57 on August 31, 2011, 11:23:50 am
Stuck brake rotor bolts? get an old hex wrench and the welder.

(http://i120.photobucket.com/albums/o187/mxvet57/POSTING%20PICKS/100_7774.jpg)



Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Andrew on September 01, 2011, 12:56:46 am
Strangely amazing just what you can take apart with a welder


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Mr.Black on September 01, 2011, 05:01:07 am
Tire changer info;

 https://picasaweb.google.com/SE.HSTASE.Region/HarborFreightTireBalancer#5183130105228133106


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Drif10 on October 16, 2011, 10:29:58 am
We all are familiar with how useful wd40 is in helping to degrease a bike, like getting off chain lube.

Here's another use for ya:

I use it to lube the tire beads when I'm mounting it on a rim. Makes it slide on easy as you please, really helps to keep you from pinching a tube, and the biggest advantage:

When it dries, it makes the rubber tacky, kind of like the old tire tube trick mentioned earlier. Why is this such a good thing? Well, it makes the tire seal better on the rim, which is nice, but the big one is that it really makes it bond to the rim, eliminating the need for a rim lock.

Here in the east, it works just great as a rim lock, haven't used one for years, regardless of tire or bike. If I was out west, where all the rocks are sharp edged as opposed to rounded, I might go back to using one, only after I had a failure without one.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: mxvet57 on February 06, 2012, 11:30:56 am
Problem bending over those locking tabs on things like the clutch basket nut. I use a seal pulling tool.

(http://i120.photobucket.com/albums/o187/mxvet57/POSTING%20PICKS/100_2371-1.jpg)

(http://i120.photobucket.com/albums/o187/mxvet57/POSTING%20PICKS/100_2365.jpg)


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: darkstarmoto on February 06, 2012, 06:39:21 pm

Don't throw out that old baking sheet or cooking pot from the kitchen.

They make excllent trays to disassemble stuff in to catch little parts falling off and to keep fasteners from wandering off the edge of the workbench as you keep working.

And they make nice durable parts cleaning containers. I keep several shapes & sizes handy along with a huge collection of cleaning brushes. Lots less wasted solvent.


And on that note....cupcake tins are awesome for keeping small parts organized. You can label each pocket with a sharpie while your taking parts off. Then after everything goes back where it belongs you just hit it with some brake cleaner or what have you and the marker comes off and the pan is clean and ready for the next job.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: mxvet57 on February 09, 2012, 10:46:32 pm
When pulling the cam shaft zip tie the chain to the cam gear. Don't have to worry about retiming the cams.

(http://i120.photobucket.com/albums/o187/mxvet57/POSTING%20PICKS/100_2470.jpg)


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Cablebandit on February 10, 2012, 07:55:45 am
Are you just tipping the cam up to get the bucket out?


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: mxvet57 on February 10, 2012, 09:34:09 am

Are you just tipping the cam up to get the bucket out?


Yep

(http://i120.photobucket.com/albums/o187/mxvet57/POSTING%20PICKS/100_2458.jpg)


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: bomber on February 10, 2012, 10:17:12 am

When pulling the cam shaft zip tie the chain to the cam gear. Don't have to worry about retiming the cams.

(http://i120.photobucket.com/albums/o187/mxvet57/POSTING%20PICKS/100_2470.jpg)


Now THAT is a great idea! Thanks!


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Cablebandit on February 10, 2012, 12:39:54 pm
Sweet.  So your cam chain tensioner takes up that much slack?  When I did the Wee valves I didn't have enough chain to lift them out that way.

It's an awesome idea BTW.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: mxvet57 on February 10, 2012, 05:14:31 pm

Sweet.  So your cam chain tensioner takes up that much slack?  



Removed that to.

(http://i120.photobucket.com/albums/o187/mxvet57/POSTING%20PICKS/100_2448.jpg)

(http://i120.photobucket.com/albums/o187/mxvet57/POSTING%20PICKS/100_2449.jpg)


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Cablebandit on February 10, 2012, 06:08:08 pm
I figured you did. I did as well when I did mine. Problem is there wasn't enough slack to pull it up like on your pic. I'll try again on the next bike.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: scotteroni on February 10, 2012, 11:48:41 pm
Here's a tip. Put a lock on your tool box the day your son is born. It won't be long until your finding your one of kind german made tool getting rusty buried somewhere in the backyard.  :facepalm:

But seriously, here are some tips i've discovered.

Put colored pin striping tape around your tool handles to easily identify then when someone else borrows them.

Soak brake parts in hot soapy water after degreasing to remove the old brake fluid stuff out. rinse with clear water and blow out with compressed air.

When bleeding brakes never pump the levers quickly and all the way to the grips. It introduces air back into the system. Pump slowly and leave a space of at least 3/8 between lever and grip.

To remove a brake piston stuck in the caliper soak the caliper in very hot water for a few minutes, get a can of compressed air turn it upside down and spray the super cold propellant into the hollow of the piston for a few seconds and the piston should slid out easier with a pair of pliers and rag.

Balled up aluminum foil with spit on it cleans rust off chrome.

Cheap suave brand shampoo works as well as more expensive hand cleaner.

Bread wire tires stripped of the paper are great emergency carburetor jet cleaners.

Quick way to check which plug isn't firing right by putting water in spray bottle and spraying each header. see which one doesnt vaporize water as quickly or at all.

If your bike runs smoother with the air filter out your bike is running rich.

Keep a headband flashlight in your tool kit. It comes in handy if you get stuck by the side of the road at night and gives you two hands free to make necessary repairs. It also lets makes you more visible to other traffic as you move your head around.

Startron brand  fuel stabilizer is 99% naptha. You can get Naptha at any hardware store for a lot cheaper.

You can bring back faded black plastic on handlebar controls by wiping on petroleum jelly,letting it sit overnight wiping it off and buffing with a rag.

This is all i can think of for the moment.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: mxvet57 on February 19, 2012, 11:09:40 pm
Have a tight space that you need to get a bolt started? This is what i did to get the bolt started for the plug on the cam chain tensioner.

Get one of these springy things.
(http://i120.photobucket.com/albums/o187/mxvet57/POSTING%20PICKS/100_2555.jpg)

Next i fished it through the access hole.
(http://i120.photobucket.com/albums/o187/mxvet57/POSTING%20PICKS/100_2556-2.jpg)

Put a small amount of dielectric compound on the end and stuck the bolt in it.
(http://i120.photobucket.com/albums/o187/mxvet57/POSTING%20PICKS/100_2559.jpg)

(http://i120.photobucket.com/albums/o187/mxvet57/POSTING%20PICKS/100_2561-1.jpg)

Got the bolt started and now can get the wrench on it.
(http://i120.photobucket.com/albums/o187/mxvet57/POSTING%20PICKS/100_2563.jpg)



Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: davenay67 on May 10, 2012, 11:07:47 am
Cheap suave brand shampoo works as well as more expensive hand cleaner.

Bread wire tires stripped of the paper are great emergency carburetor jet cleaners.


Lava hand soap is awesome and runs about $1.50 for 2 bars.

Guitar string also work fantastic. If you play guitar, new strings are always too long. Snip a few inches off each string and you have a set of different sizes.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: davenay67 on May 10, 2012, 11:16:22 am

Scratched or hazed plastic headlight lens, etc.? Use regular white Colgate toothpaste to buff out the plastic lens. It's cheaper than buying dedicated plastic lens polish, leaves your plastic parts minty fresh, and does double duty by helping to maintain your periodontal health.


And if your headlights are REALLY hazy or yellow, use various grades of sandpaper first. Start with 200 and step all the way to the final finish of 2000 grit. Then use a lens polish or toothpaste.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: JonS on May 18, 2012, 07:07:49 am

When pulling the cam shaft zip tie the chain to the cam gear. Don't have to worry about retiming the cams.

(http://i120.photobucket.com/albums/o187/mxvet57/POSTING%20PICKS/100_2470.jpg)


Great idea!

This is the best epoxy I have ever used. I asked a guy at the hardware store, which epoxy to buy and this is what he recommended and he was right. J&B Kwik
(http://images.drillspot.com/pimages/7090/709002_300.jpg)


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: gregc on March 24, 2013, 04:15:11 pm
Nitrile gloves work wonders for keeping your knuckles blood free and makes cleanup simple and quick.  I did some nasty suspension work on a 20 year old car without one scratch to my hands.  From then on I wear them to do every thing that requires more than an Allen wrench to complete.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Moto Morphin Power Ranger on March 24, 2013, 08:08:58 pm
Strip that bolt/nut did ya? :mad2: Go inside and grab the aluminum foil, pull a piece off ball it up and stick it in the socket. The foil will fill in the rounded parts. :smoking: I tried this while taking the headers off my brothers truck, it was a last ditch shot.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: HipGnosis on May 12, 2013, 04:36:03 pm
Here's a trick I just conjured up out of necessity working on my car;
To turn a bolt where I didn't have room to work the ratchet very well - I put an allen wrench that just fit into the ratchet side of the socket and used it as a short handle.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: HipGnosis on May 12, 2013, 04:45:08 pm
I have a car, a truck and 2 bikes.
I track maintenance and repairs (& etc.) for/of them on the computer (naturally).
But, that means the info isn't accessible in the vehicles or the garage, so...
I now change oil on all of them at multiples of 5,000 miles on the odometer.
I can tell at a glance of ea. vehicles odometer how far away the next oil change is 'due'.

BTW; included in my maintenance log file for ea vehicle is a list of exactly what tools are needed for ea. routine maint. job.  The jobs go faster when I don't make multiple trips to the tool box.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Global Rider on August 13, 2013, 07:53:07 am
I'll start: To bleed brakes quickly, I use a 60cc cath tip syringe and some surplus tubing. Attach one end of the tubing to the syringe and the other end to the bleed valve, crack the valve and draw back on the syringe. The syringe draws fresh fluid from the reservoir and all air from the line. Tighten the valve and, voila! Brake lines completely bled and free of air.


Here is an even easier method that I use that doesn't even introduce air into the system.

After removing the master cylinder reservoir cover, I drain the brake fluid by pumping the brake lever till the hole within the reservoir is almost exposed.

I then blot the residue (and somtimes there will be dark particles/soot at the bottom of the master cylinder reservoir) with a patch of paper towel dampened (not dripping) with isopropyl alcohol till it is clean (so far no air has been introduced into the system).

I add some brake fluid and continue flushing the system till fresh clear brake fluid comes out of each bleeder.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Oddball on September 18, 2013, 10:59:10 pm
(http://pics1.ds-static.com/prodimg/11650/300.JPG)

Had a gasket that was seeping.  Was not sure which one.  Presure washed the engine and sprayed with Arrid.  Let it dry white and went for a ride.  Instanlly knew where to try and tighten.  Actually needed to replace, but works like a charm.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: mxvet57 on September 18, 2013, 11:03:27 pm

(http://pics1.ds-static.com/prodimg/11650/300.JPG)

Had a gasket that was seeping.  Was not sure which one.  Presure washed the engine and sprayed with Arrid.  Let it dry white and went for a ride.  Instanlly knew where to try and tighten.  Actually needed to replace, but works like a charm.



And no more under bike odor.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: HipGnosis on October 26, 2013, 02:55:48 pm

Had a gasket that was seeping.  Was not sure which one.  Presure washed the engine and sprayed with Arrid.  Let it dry white and went for a ride.  Instanlly knew where to try and tighten.  Actually needed to replace, but works like a charm.

Does that work with any spray deoderant or JUST arrid extra dry?


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: bomber on October 26, 2013, 03:02:07 pm

(http://pics1.ds-static.com/prodimg/11650/300.JPG)

Had a gasket that was seeping.  Was not sure which one.  Presure washed the engine and sprayed with Arrid.  Let it dry white and went for a ride.  Instanlly knew where to try and tighten.  Actually needed to replace, but works like a charm.


Cheap athelete's foot spray does the same thing . . . . .  . in case you're out of pit stop


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: HipGnosis on October 28, 2013, 02:51:10 pm
To recycle used oil;
Put a heavy trash bag in a plastic milk crate
Put about a cup of oil-zorb (aka kitty-litter) in the bag
Put the bottles you use to transport used oil in the bag, in the milk crate
It's easier to pour oil from your drain pan into the bottles because they can't tip over in the crate
Any spills when pouring the oil from your drain pan to the bottles will be contained in the bag & o-z
The crate can be tied or bungied in your truck bed or trunk
The milk crate has handles for carrying it to the recycle collection point
I keep an oily rag in the crate too, the recycle collection points can be pretty dirty


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: 02Tac on December 07, 2013, 12:46:48 am
For my used oil, I simply went to the local hardware store and bought a plastic, 5 gallon,  diesel can ( they are normally yellow) and wrote "used oil" on the side with a sharpie. I simply pour my drain pan into that and then when it gets close to full I take it to Walmart to dump it. no muss, no fuss and easy to handle.

Something like this.
http://www.fleetfarm.com/detail/Midwest-Can-5-Gal.-Diesel-Container/0000000038885?utm_source=googleps&utm_medium=shopping%2Bsearch&utm_campaign=google%2Bproduct%20search&gslfah&gclid=CNv3jMK0nbsCFUjNOgodKzwAFg


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Mr.Black on December 07, 2013, 04:25:06 am

For my used oil, I simply went to the local hardware store and bought a plastic, 5 gallon,  diesel can ( they are normally yellow) and wrote "used oil" on the side with a sharpie. I simply pour my drain pan into that and then when it gets close to full I take it to Walmart to dump it. no muss, no fuss and easy to handle.

Something like this.
http://www.fleetfarm.com/detail/Midwest-Can-5-Gal.-Diesel-Container/0000000038885?utm_source=googleps&utm_medium=shopping%2Bsearch&utm_campaign=google%2Bproduct%20search&gslfah&gclid=CNv3jMK0nbsCFUjNOgodKzwAFg


My local mechanic heats with it. I just walk in put the jug down grab an empty one and walk out.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Papa Lazarou on December 09, 2013, 04:09:36 pm



Cheap athelete's foot spray does the same thing . . . . .  . in case you're out of pit stop


So does talcum powder


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: HipGnosis on August 11, 2014, 11:30:19 am
Tire bead broken by thought instead of contraption

My dad was a mechanic when he was young.  His dad was mechanic all his life.
I’m a shade-tree mechanic.
I’m also a thinking man.
These complement each other and my motorcycling.

I changed a tire on my Vstar.   So I had to break the bead.  So I thought about it on my last cpl rides before the change.
Breaking a tire bead is really just applying sufficient force at a specific spot.
I don’t change tires enough to justify the money or space for a store-bought bead breaker (or tire changer).
Some of the DIY bead breakers I’ve seen on the internet are brutally scary while others need to be mounted to a wall stud...  they’re all ‘out’.
I have multiple ways of applying force - threads and a ratchet, breaker bar, pry-bars, tire iron...

I invented a way to break the bead quite easily that didn’t need me to buy anything or mount anything!!
I now present the easy, portable, cheap, fast  and easy way to break a tire bead;

All it uses is:  a motorcycle tie-down strap, a piece of auto fuel line, a car jack, a plumbing T and a screw driver.
Yes, that is ALL - I concede that not everyone has a piece of auto fuel line or a plumbing T, but it’s CHEAP!

Instructions;
Release air, remove valve stem
Tire / wheel flat / horizontal
- I did it on a trash can that it fit between the disk break and the rim, with plastic tubing sliced and put over the rim of the can.  Could easily be done with the tire & wheel on 2x4s on the floor.
Put the piece of fuel line (7/16, fuel injection, 4+ inches) on the tire right next to the rim of the wheel
- note: Fuel injection fuel line is stronger and therefore stiffer than ‘regular’ fuel line.
Put the jack (I used a bottle jack, but most any portable could be used) on the tire & fuel line with the inside edge of the jack lined up with the outer edge of the wheel.
Raise the jack enough to put the ram of the jack into the T fitting  – 3/4” PVC (iron would be ‘better’ because it has slight flanges).  You won’t need the fitting if you use a scissors jack...
Wrap the strap around the tire twice – and over the T fitting.  Secure it (to itself) and snug it.
Slowly ‘jack’ the jack.
Use the screwdriver to ensure the jack doesn’t press down on the wheel, but right next to it, on the fuel line.
Once the jack is along side the wheel, jack it!

I was going to use a piece of 1x4 under the tire when I did the second bead, but it as so easy and FAST  that I forgot about it - and didn’t need it.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Andrew on September 08, 2014, 12:03:09 am
THere is another way to brake the bead,  If you have another bike get a bit of carpet put it down next to the second bike (keeps the rim from getting scratched). lay the rim on the ground & use the kickstand of the second bike to break the bead.
  Been working well for me and real cheap to do  :bigok:


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: MonkeyNuke on October 10, 2014, 04:25:54 pm
Front Wheel Rotation.
Wanting to check/add air to front wheel. While on center stand, needed the front wheel  a quarter turn to get the valve stem in the proper location to check air pressure. Too much weight on the front wheel made turning by hand very difficult. Not wanting to push bike off center stand, I wrapped a heavy object (large pipe wrench) in a rag and placed in front wheel on horizontal spoke.  Then I pushed down on the rear end to lift the front tire off the ground and the wheel rotated the quarter turn to access the valve stem.
I've owned that pipe wrench for maybe 25 years and I think that is the first time I used it.
That was to move the wheel in the forward direction. To move it in a reverse direction, I slip a rag through the spokes, away from the stem. Then I grab both ends of the rag and pull up. The tire skids along the floor but works fairly well.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Walker on July 18, 2016, 03:53:01 pm
Can't believe nobody's mentioned the DIY carb sync tool yet. Need to sync your carbs but don't want to spend $125 on a Morgan Carbtune? Well for $0.40 per foot, go buy  20 feet of clear pvc tubing at the hardware store and make a manometer for under $10 that is self calibrating and more accurate... that's right, more accurate and precise (I'll explain why in a bit.)  You'll have to decide what diameter you'll need, but for me 3/16 inch ID fits perfectly snug on my bikes carb vacuum ports. I had an old metal yardstick at home, but any scrap piece of wood will work. Find the halfway point of the tubing, then bend it in a U and zip tie it to the yardstick all the way to the top. That leaves you 2 7-foot lengths of tubing to go to two carbs. Using a turkey baster or large syringe, fill the tube with ATF. Technically nearly any fluid will work, but I like red ATF. You want a more viscous fluid than water with a higher boiling point....water can boil at room temperature under vacuum. Also ATF won't damage your engine if a mishap occurs and it gets sucked into the carb...just cause smoke and lube the top end of that cylinder.  Anyway, the only tricky part is getting the right amount of ATF in the tube so it makes two columns about 18 to 24 inches high up each tube from the U bend at the bottom...and all the air bubbles out. Patience is the key here, but once you've got it done and all the bubbles out it'll always be right and you'll never have to do it again. Mine has hung on the garage wall for years now.

The manometer uses differential pressure, not against the atmospheric pressure, but against each leg and gravity. It never needs calibrating because gravity always works. It's directly comparing the vacuum of each carb relative to the other, not against each carb to the atmospheric pressure as a reference.

I built mine years ago, and it still works flawlessly, used it just last night in fact. I simply use some string or a zip tie to hang it in a convenient place right in front of my bike... you could get creative with your carpentry skills and make a lumber stand.

Yes it only measures two carbs at a time. But it is more precise and accurate. Balance cylinders 1 vs 2. Then switch ports over to 3 vs 4 (being sure to cap off the ports on 1 and 2 first.) Then sync 1 vs 4....may be iterative process though, as your idle speed is sure to change and adjusting the idle speed seems to change the sync between 1 and 4 for some reason...maybe just a quirk the the throttle linkage on my GPz, because I don't remember having that issue with my Katana.

My homemade manometer is more precise because 1) the engine pulses don't cause the fluid to bounce once a vacuum is established in both legs....no restrictors needed. The columns pulse maybe 1 mm at most. With my old mercury stick even with restrictors the mercury columns bounced up and down maddeningly. 2) The standard in my manual says the carbs are synched if within 2.7 kpa, or 2 cm Hg column height.  Well, with a specific gravity of 0.87, an equivalent column height of ATF is about 12.5 inches! I'm able to easily get my carbs within about a half inch, if not spot on. So for less than $10 of plastic tubing, some zip ties, some wood or a yardstick, and 16 cc's of ATF you'll have a great method of syncing your carbs.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Blue is Best on July 19, 2016, 08:57:26 pm
WOW!!! That is a heck of an idea. Please move to the front of the room!


Title: Changing tires with the Zip Tie method
Post by: Walker on August 08, 2016, 10:44:58 am
If changing tires has always been difficult and daunting for you, or you are really concerned about scratching your rims, this method is for you! I've read about and seen a YouTube video on it, so with new rubber to put on I went to Harbor Freight to get two packs of 24 inch long zip ties at $1.34 each (10 per pack).

So far I've only done my rear tire (which for me has always been the most difficult.) It went like this: after getting the rear wheel off and the valve core removed, I soaped up the beads with some dish soap water and propped the wheel flat on the concrete with two 2x4s. I actually broke the beads free using a garden spade (shovel) by placing the blade of the spade on the bead next to the rim edge and jumping on it. It popped right off and came loose all around. Flip over and repeat on the other side.

Then take a seat on your stool, stand the wheel up, and feed a zip tie through between the rim and the beads, squeezing the beads into the drop center of the rim. Cinch the zip tie up best you can, squeezing the beads together. Continue around the rim. Took me 6 zip ties total, but I probably could have used more to make it that much easier. Go around and cinch them up some more, as after you get them on it becomes easier and easier to squeeze the beads together.

Soap up the beads again, lay the wheel back down on the 2x4s and position the tire in the drop center on one side of the wheel and lift it up over the rim on the other. I actually used a tire spoon at this point to get it started over, but once to starts, the rest can be pulled off by hand. It helps to have the tires warmed in the sun or with a heat gun to make them more flexible. But it was comparatively really easy than just using tire irons alone!

Cleaned up my wheel really well then got ready to put the new tire on. I used 8 zip ties to cinch the beads tight all the way around, then soapy water on both beads. Set the wheel down on the 2x4s and, double checked the tire rotation direction, then got it started on one side in the drop center, I was able to get the tire on by hand with no tools at all...just kneeled on the tire and pushed it on! Took less than 30 seconds. Before cutting the zip ties, rotate the tire around to line up the red dot with the valve stem. You can either use some wire cutters and cut the ties, or do like I did and used a very small screwdriver to release the ratchet pawl on the zip tie so I can reuse them on my front tire. (PITA! But I'm a tightwad.)

The new tire (Shinko 009 Raven) popped right on the beads at 45 psi, and balanced right up easily. Rode in to work this morning and I am very happy so far. I wanted to scrub in the new rear tire before changing the front. I'll likely have the new front tire on tonight after work.

This has been a real game changer for me. I intend to use this method from now on because the extra time it took to get the ties on and cinched up really paid off big time. My wheels have a very shallow drop center so changing tires has always been really challenging, and the local shop charges $30 per wheel and will only mount tires you bought from them. For you traditionalists poo pooing this method thinking "grow a beard and some gonads and get out there with your irons son! That's a sissy way!" all I can say is try it, you'll be a devout convert after.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Bounce on August 08, 2016, 11:16:44 am
Got a pick of how the zip ties are done?


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Walker on August 08, 2016, 06:18:30 pm

Got a pick of how the zip ties are done?


Not my pic, but shows it perfectly

(http://com.ridexperience.metzeler.com/files/2011/10/zipties1.jpg)


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Blue is Best on August 09, 2016, 05:51:20 pm



Not my pic, but shows it perfectly

(http://com.ridexperience.metzeler.com/files/2011/10/zipties1.jpg)


Another good idea by Walker. I had ordered a Harbor Freight tire changing set-up a week and a half ago for cheap so I will use a wood clamp as a way to keep the tire squeezed for easy removal.


Title: Re: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...
Post by: Walker on August 10, 2016, 11:11:25 am
I now have my new front tire on and it was even easier than the rear. Now that I have the technique down it went really quick, and I was able to both remove the old and put the new tire on without even touching my tire spoons. Didn't even need any weights with the new front tire. Like I said, I wanted to get the HF tire changer, but I don't have the space to store one in my garage. Even with one, I think that the time it would take to get it out and set it up, I would already be done with this method. Using a shovel to break the bead is super easy too.


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