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Topic: West coast to East coast record  (Read 9849 times)

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« on: December 02, 2016, 05:17:04 pm »

One of my good friends has a brother that has begun riding motorcycles after being away from them since his teenage years. He has taken back to bikes like a fish to water. This brother read an article about a fellow that recently set a new record for going from coast to coast in thirty-eight hours! 2,800 miles! So my buddy's brother called me and said he was going to break the record.        He has access to fuel cells and wants to put one each in each side of his BMW and one in his top case. That's fifteen extra gallons on top of what's in the BMW gas tank. Then, he says he can go for ten hours or so before he has to attend to business. So he plans on going 800 or more miles before stopping. He wants to leave next Spring and get BMW and a tire mfr to help him out with costs.

He recently did 1,500 miles in twenty-four hours. I just don't know about this. The question that comes to mind is, why? I told him it was dangerous riding through the night with animals every where and his doing this without getting "foggy". He can't stop and has to average 75 MPH.
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« Reply #1 on: December 02, 2016, 06:41:44 pm »

Animals really aren't much of an issue on the interstates, and those would be the only way to route it.

A friend of mine here in San Diego had a similar plan- he rigged up a trailer for his K1600LT to use as a giant fuel tank, and had a catheter installed.  His goal was to make it to the beach in Jacksonville without stopping at all.

Unfortunately, he was pulled over in Alabama for having a tail light out on the trailer- over 3/4 of the way through the ride.
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« Reply #2 on: December 02, 2016, 06:51:25 pm »


Animals really aren't much of an issue on the interstates, and those would be the only way to route it.

A friend of mine here in San Diego had a similar plan- he rigged up a trailer for his K1600LT to use as a giant fuel tank, and had a catheter installed.  His goal was to make it to the beach in Jacksonville without stopping at all.

Unfortunately, he was pulled over in Alabama for having a tail light out on the trailer- over 3/4 of the way through the ride.


I remember reading about that guy...isn't he a BMW dealer?
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« Reply #3 on: December 02, 2016, 09:51:26 pm »

Yes.
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« Reply #4 on: December 02, 2016, 10:20:16 pm »


Animals really aren't much of an issue on the interstates, and those would be the only way to route it.

A friend of mine here in San Diego had a similar plan- he rigged up a trailer for his K1600LT to use as a giant fuel tank, and had a catheter installed.  His goal was to make it to the beach in Jacksonville without stopping at all.

Unfortunately, he was pulled over in Alabama for having a tail light out on the trailer- over 3/4 of the way through the ride.


WOW. A catheter???? Not even stopping to stretch his legs??? WOW.

Why didn't he tell the cop to write fast?
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« Reply #5 on: December 02, 2016, 11:06:10 pm »

The point was to not even put a foot down until he got to the Atlantic.  Once that was blown it was all over.
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« Reply #6 on: December 03, 2016, 12:09:57 am »

They must be unofficial records. Guinness stopped doing timed records on public roads something like 10 years ago. The IBA won't specifically document/certify a ride that doesn't include gas stops every 300 miles or which require excessive speeding to complete in the time claimed.

On something as simple as a SS1K some guy wrote an article (Motorcyclist? Rider? [something]) about how he stopped to gamble in Vegas so had to run sections at hyper-sonic speed to catch back up, wheelies on the entrance ramp and other such machismo claims.

The IBA revoked his cert.
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« Reply #7 on: December 03, 2016, 08:43:51 am »

Can't change the human body and Mother Nature

Surviving a dumb trip like this is just pure luck

http://drowsydriving.org/about/facts-and-stats/
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« Reply #8 on: December 03, 2016, 11:58:43 am »


They must be unofficial records. Guinness stopped doing timed records on public roads something like 10 years ago. The IBA won't specifically document/certify a ride that doesn't include gas stops every 300 miles or which require excessive speeding to complete in the time claimed.

On something as simple as a SS1K some guy wrote an article (Motorcyclist? Rider? [something]) about how he stopped to gamble in Vegas so had to run sections at hyper-sonic speed to catch back up, wheelies on the entrance ramp and other such machismo claims.

The IBA revoked his cert.


I didn't know this. Given those parameters, there is only so much one could do by following all the rules. I bet IBA doesn't really check.
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I see what you did there.




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« Reply #9 on: December 03, 2016, 02:18:49 pm »




I didn't know this. Given those parameters, there is only so much one could do by following all the rules. I bet IBA doesn't really check.


They absolutely do check. It's their entire purpose.

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« Reply #10 on: December 04, 2016, 10:50:49 am »




They absolutely do check. It's their entire purpose.




They don't want more accidents.   Good on them.  Now get some sleep.
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« Reply #11 on: December 04, 2016, 02:43:08 pm »

They absolutely do check. It's their entire purpose.


^^THIS!

There's a reason their certs are recognized by more riders.

Keeping in mind that there are certain self-proclaimed experts who assert that ANY rider doing more than 350 miles in a day is a danger to him/herself and everyone else on the road:

More appropriate for this discussion is the article written by Dr. Don Arthur (admiral, ret); a former head of Bethesda, former Navy Surgeon General, and a long distance rider with no little accomplishment under his belt.

http://members.triton.net/vandenbe/Fatigue%20&%20MotorcycleTouring.pdf
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« Reply #12 on: December 04, 2016, 05:45:45 pm »

Great article bounce

I think it's not a mileage thing but more about how much sleep one is getting and also circadium rhythm

You are more likely to be fatigued when you are riding at a time of day you are normally sleeping
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I see what you did there.




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« Reply #13 on: December 04, 2016, 06:31:31 pm »

A fair bit of training, too.
You don't just go out one day and throw down a thousand miles without working up to it.


PS. I know there are those who can, but they are the exception rather than the rule.
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« Reply #14 on: December 04, 2016, 08:57:44 pm »

I once did 1,000 miles and wasn't trying. Then I did 840 miles in twelve hours stopping frequently because it was three years ago in the record setting heat wave. I was lucky because I went 350 miles in Utah where the speed limit is 80 MPH and no cops.
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« Reply #15 on: December 05, 2016, 11:43:26 am »

As far as riding 800 miles non stop and the guy that got pulled over attempting a coast to coast without putting a foot down is very extreme and IMO dangerous. I am a IBA member and have a Bun Burner Gold ride scheduled in June. For some reason nobody talks about the "Mile Eater Club" within the IBA.

Many Many good points on riding long distance. IMO, preparation and having the correct riding gear are key.

Here is an example on how one piece of gear and a change in mindset made a difference. Two rides, the exact same mileage. One ride was done in 14 hours and I was absolutely hobbled with being sore the next day. 5 days later. The other ride was done in 11 hours and the next day I felt as if I made an easy 200 mile scenic day ride. The distance covered was 700 miles one way.

The key difference was that I was able to use an Air Hawk seat cushion during the 2nd ride. Almost as important was the mindset that I was going to do 150 mile legs between gas stops.

If you keep your butt in the saddle longer, the miles go by easier. Comfort is the key.  

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« Reply #16 on: December 05, 2016, 05:36:09 pm »

There are plenty of times I got an early start, the weather was right and I arrived early enough I coulda kept on going. The big difference is I didn't keep going. If I had my memory might have been different. 


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« Reply #17 on: December 05, 2016, 06:59:04 pm »

. This brother read an article about a fellow that recently set a new record for going from coast to coast in thirty-eight hours! 2,800 miles!


I completed a ride back in September from Coney Island, NY to the Golden Gate bridge. The IBA calls this a 50CC THW (coast to coast in 50 hrs, The Hard Way).  Its 2930 miles versus 2350 or so going from Jacksonville to San Diego.  I rolled up to the GGB 38.5hrs after I left NY.  We were required to get a gas receipt every 350 miles and could only carry the IBA max of 11.5 gallons.  I wasn't going real fast, just kept the wheels rolling.  Think I had 7 fuel stops, used the bathroom every other stop and my helmet never left my head the entire time.  I had planned to stop in Nebraska for a 4hr nap, but I honestly felt pretty good at that point, so I just kept on riding.  I can't imagine that 38hrs is a record, surely there is some nut that is willing to ride 100 mph and have a lead car(s) looking for LEO's etc.  Hell, I don't even use a radar detector and my phone charger died so I couldn't use waze.
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« Reply #18 on: December 05, 2016, 07:37:59 pm »




I completed a ride back in September from Coney Island, NY to the Golden Gate bridge. The IBA calls this a 50CC THW (coast to coast in 50 hrs, The Hard Way).  Its 2930 miles versus 2350 or so going from Jacksonville to San Diego.  I rolled up to the GGB 38.5hrs after I left NY.  We were required to get a gas receipt every 350 miles and could only carry the IBA max of 11.5 gallons.  I wasn't going real fast, just kept the wheels rolling.  Think I had 7 fuel stops, used the bathroom every other stop and my helmet never left my head the entire time.  I had planned to stop in Nebraska for a 4hr nap, but I honestly felt pretty good at that point, so I just kept on riding.  I can't imagine that 38hrs is a record, surely there is some nut that is willing to ride 100 mph and have a lead car(s) looking for LEO's etc.  Hell, I don't even use a radar detector and my phone charger died so I couldn't use waze.


Wait a minute! That is a 76 MPH average and you had to stop every 350 miles??? That is if you could go 350 miles. Don't tell me you didn't see 100MPH!

Your stock price just went up with me.
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« Reply #19 on: December 05, 2016, 10:00:26 pm »

Re: Mile Eater Club

The reason it's not talked about is because most people simply don't know about it. It's really not much more than accumulating many different certs and a lot of people aren't into that.

Heck even I qualified for at least the basic level, have my name in that list, and got the t-shirt. I think it was somewhere after my 2nd or 3rd ss1k, a BBG or two and a SS2K.  Very few of the levels are times (beyond the requirements of the cert received). It's collecting x certs (in some cases "extreme" like a BBG, etc.).

http://www.ironbutt.com/mileeater/
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« Reply #20 on: December 06, 2016, 03:58:49 am »




Wait a minute! That is a 76 MPH average and you had to stop every 350 miles??? That is if you could go 350 miles. Don't tell me you didn't see 100MPH!

Your stock price just went up with me.


No excessive speeds, I was going with traffic the whole way.  I did push the 350 mile limit as close as I could.  The key was to keep the stops to 5 minutes.  My point is that if you had a 450 mile range, were catheterized and didn't value your license, a much quicker time is doable.  You would also have to have some luck with traffic, accidents, weather etc.
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« Reply #21 on: December 06, 2016, 09:26:49 am »

Over the years I've seen the confusion of elapsed time being a function of top speed instead of rolling average. It takes a lot of work to make up for 0 mph so the less time you spend there, the less time you have to push.

Given the habits of most people (outside of the IBA) who I've ridden with, it's not surprising they think that the ton (or more) is needed to do these rides. After all, they stop every hour to walk around, spend 45 minutes at every gas stop, some can't go more than 90 miles on a tank of fuel, and do set downs for every meal. Some don't ride within an hour of sun up or sun down (some never at night), and the list of constraints could go on from there. That's a lot of time at 0 mph.
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« Reply #22 on: December 06, 2016, 09:59:41 am »

I have really been enlightened reading the replies from you distance riders. I still have to ask the question. Why?

Riding distance is no big deal for me but I have great scenery to look at or good roads to ride and a place to arrive at. But to just ride with no purpose other than to say I did it?

If it keeps you out of the therapist's office, well, motor on.

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« Reply #23 on: December 06, 2016, 10:31:49 am »




Wait a minute! That is a 76 MPH average and you had to stop every 350 miles??? That is if you could go 350 miles. Don't tell me you didn't see 100MPH!

Your stock price just went up with me.


Especially that first 45 minutes getting out of NYC
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« Reply #24 on: December 06, 2016, 09:08:36 pm »


I have really been enlightened reading the replies from you distance riders. I still have to ask the question. Why?

Riding distance is no big deal for me but I have great scenery to look at or good roads to ride and a place to arrive at. But to just ride with no purpose other than to say I did it?

If it keeps you out of the therapist's office, well, motor on.

 Bigok


Doesn't interest me, but I understand it.  Same reason people climb mountains.  Push personal limits, bragging rights, because it's there, because some asshole in 5th grade called you Nancy and you've been trying to prove him wrong ever since, etc etc etc.
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« Reply #25 on: December 06, 2016, 11:14:48 pm »



Especially that first 45 minutes getting out of NYC

We left at 4am in order to beat the NYC commuter traffic and miss rush hour near Chicago.  Only traffic I hit was 50 miles outside of SF.  I was fortunate to have a local who was following my SPOT track, meet up with me and school me in the fine art of lane splitting.  What a blast, felt like a hooligan!!
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« Reply #26 on: December 07, 2016, 09:06:11 am »

Ney ney!

It's not about bragging rights. It's ADHD.

So few projects get finished because the next interesting thing grabs our attention.  With endurance riding there are enough discrete tasks to keep the floor level of "noise" high enough that we don't lose interest. Stitch together enough of those tasks and you end up with a BBG.

There's a reason why 45 minute "chats" at every gas stop end up with me pacing around, tapping my toe, and wonder whadup with this delay. Or that 5 minutes into the stop to go on a tour of cave and I'm ready to go ride again. Or stopping at 6pm and wasting half a day in yet another hotel room has me bouncing off the walls. Or stopping for 3 sit-down meals a day seems odd when a Cliff Bar in the tank bag is plenty. Or why pulling into a parking lot along the south rim of the Grand Canyon, walking out to a lookout point at sunset, getting another tourist to take a couple of photos, then hopping back on the bike and leaving is plenty for me to say I've been there. Same as with seeing Hoover dam: Pull over on the south end of the dam, walk 10 yards to the edge, look over, proclaim "Damn! That's a lot of concrete!" and get back rolling again before security could point out that I was in a "No Parking: Services Area Only" area.

The ride IS the point; not the destination.
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« Reply #27 on: December 07, 2016, 10:16:16 am »


Ney ney!

It's not about bragging rights. It's ADHD.

So few projects get finished because the next interesting thing grabs our attention.  With endurance riding there are enough discrete tasks to keep the floor level of "noise" high enough that we don't lose interest. Stitch together enough of those tasks and you end up with a BBG.

There's a reason why 45 minute "chats" at every gas stop end up with me pacing around, tapping my toe, and wonder whadup with this delay. Or that 5 minutes into the stop to go on a tour of cave and I'm ready to go ride again. Or stopping at 6pm and wasting half a day in yet another hotel room has me bouncing off the walls. Or stopping for 3 sit-down meals a day seems odd when a Cliff Bar in the tank bag is plenty. Or why pulling into a parking lot along the south rim of the Grand Canyon, walking out to a lookout point at sunset, getting another tourist to take a couple of photos, then hopping back on the bike and leaving is plenty for me to say I've been there. Same as with seeing Hoover dam: Pull over on the south end of the dam, walk 10 yards to the edge, look over, proclaim "Damn! That's a lot of concrete!" and get back rolling again before security could point out that I was in a "No Parking: Services Area Only" area.

The ride IS the point; not the destination.




 

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« Reply #28 on: December 07, 2016, 08:26:11 pm »

Damn Bounce

You are damn good !!
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« Reply #29 on: December 07, 2016, 10:20:07 pm »

Ney ney!

It's not about bragging rights. It's ADHD.

So few projects get finished because the next interesting thing grabs our attention.  With endurance riding there are enough discrete tasks to keep the floor level of "noise" high enough that we don't lose interest. Stitch together enough of those tasks and you end up with a BBG.

There's a reason why 45 minute "chats" at every gas stop end up with me pacing around, tapping my toe, and wonder whadup with this delay. Or that 5 minutes into the stop to go on a tour of cave and I'm ready to go ride again. Or stopping at 6pm and wasting half a day in yet another hotel room has me bouncing off the walls. Or stopping for 3 sit-down meals a day seems odd when a Cliff Bar in the tank bag is plenty. Or why pulling into a parking lot along the south rim of the Grand Canyon, walking out to a lookout point at sunset, getting another tourist to take a couple of photos, then hopping back on the bike and leaving is plenty for me to say I've been there. Same as with seeing Hoover dam: Pull over on the south end of the dam, walk 10 yards to the edge, look over, proclaim "Damn! That's a lot of concrete!" and get back rolling again before security could point out that I was in a "No Parking: Services Area Only" area.

The ride IS the point; not the destination.

OMG, you summed it up perfectly.  In 2011 my 17 year old son and I took a trip out West.  He was the perfect riding partner.  We went into a bunch of National parks and each time they collected $30 from me and told me the pass was good for a week blah blah blah.  I would always ask what the "must see" area of the park was because I plan to be out of here in under an hour. Lol. I understand both sides, but damn, I just want to keep the wheels rolling.
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« Reply #30 on: December 08, 2016, 03:43:09 am »


I have really been enlightened reading the replies from you distance riders. I still have to ask the question. Why?




When I was doing it -- it's been a few years -- I just saw it as a different way to ride. Most of the time, I'm a smell the roses guy, but I really liked getting on the bike a few times a year and just not getting off for awhile. It's just a different way to use the bike.

And sometimes I picked up a certificate because I actually had to get somewhere (family event, conference); that is, the destination was, in fact, the reason for the ride. Those trips typically involved long, boring slab runs leaving them behind me as soon as possible was a pretty good strategy.

The long distance rallies are the bomb. They've taken me to places and down roads I never would found. I haven't done one since moving to the left coast, but I'm starting to feel the itch again...
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« Reply #31 on: December 13, 2016, 05:57:22 pm »


They must be unofficial records. Guinness stopped doing timed records on public roads something like 10 years ago. The IBA won't specifically document/certify a ride that doesn't include gas stops every 300 miles or which require excessive speeding to complete in the time claimed.

Very wise of them.  I'm sure the folks that have alternative compass needles don't need the IBA to certify their antics.

The notion that somebody might go 2800 miles in 38 hours is obviously fringe.  You definitely wouldn't catch me lollygagging those kinds of velocities in pursuit of a record...official or unofficial. Wink
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« Reply #32 on: January 17, 2017, 10:12:55 pm »


I have really been enlightened reading the replies from you distance riders. I still have to ask the question. Why?


 


I love the challenge of researching the route, times, speeds, gas locations, hours of daylight, gas range, etc. And then, riding the route validates good planning, net of things that go sideways because of things out of my control.

The bonus is often getting to a far away place in greatly reduced time which extends riding time in new places.
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« Reply #33 on: January 18, 2017, 11:06:18 am »




I love the challenge of researching the route, times, speeds, gas locations, hours of daylight, gas range, etc. And then, riding the route validates good planning, net of things that go sideways because of things out of my control.

The bonus is often getting to a far away place in greatly reduced time which extends riding time in new places.


Months ago I was talking to one of the buddies that lives about 750 miles away. All interstate. I have figured gas stops and such. I could make it there in about eleven hours easily, get a samuch and two hours of rest and go back to make 1,500 miles in a day. But I asked myself, why?

If I was going in a straight line to visit someone far away then that would be an opportunity to get there and have more time later to see things.
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« Reply #34 on: January 18, 2017, 01:27:08 pm »

I understand both sides, but damn, I just want to keep the wheels rolling.


+1, ditto and all that stuff... I just like to ride.  When people ask why, I say I don't know, I just want to ride.

Good to see you at Stagecoach Ken.  Look forward to following you and the others for the IBA Rally this summer.  Would like to do that someday...
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« Reply #35 on: January 19, 2017, 09:24:16 am »




+1, ditto and all that stuff... I just like to ride.  When people ask why, I say I don't know, I just want to ride.

Good to see you at Stagecoach Ken.  Look forward to following you and the others for the IBA Rally this summer.  Would like to do that someday...


Likewise Paul!!
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« Reply #36 on: February 21, 2017, 10:10:23 pm »

I did an IBA sanctioned 24 hour endurance rally about 14 years ago.  There was no set route, points were awarded for total miles ridden with bonus points awarded for various check points along the way depending on the route chosen.  I rode along the foothills and eastern Rocky Mountains.  

It was June 21, the longest day of the year.  We were given route alternative / bonus planning books at 5pm on Friday evening. We had one hour to plan our routes to accumulate as many miles and bonus points as we could with our planned route in the 24 hour time frame. We were allowed to put our kickstands up and ride out an hour later at 6:00PM.  Check-in deadline was 24 hours later at 6pm Saturday night. Penalty points were accrued for each minute riders were late.  The weather was horrific.  In spite of Mother Nature's challenges I managed 1275 miles through pouring rain, zero visibility fog, snow in the mountains and very little little sunshine.  

I had a close encounter with a deer early Saturday morning and in general, I probably put myself through more than I should have.  I slept on a picnic table along the roadside for a few hours Saturday about noon.  I almost threw in the towel at about the 20 hour mark but I found a second wind and decided to push through.  I finished a few minutes late of the check in and incurred some penalty points for that.  It was my first sanctioned long distance endeavour and I managed to finish 5'th amongst some very serious Iron Butt competitors.

I don't have the desire to do it again.  I understand what drives others to do it but I don't see myself doing it again.  I am almost 65 years old now so that may have something to do with it too.  I still like to live vicariously through the riders that challenge themselves like that though.

To any and all long distance riders - have fun and stay safe out there!!!
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