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Topic: Air Shot pump and Dynaplug kit  (Read 842 times)

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RBEmerson
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Years Contributed: '07
Motorcycles: '17 FJR 1300ES, (lamented) '03 BMW K1200RS
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« on: March 20, 2017, 10:54:44 pm »

The Air Shot pump from Motopumps.com has just relieved one of my riding worries: a puncture. The pump and Dynaplug kit make short work of any puncture. The site gives the full run-down. The executive summary is: stuff (up to four) plug(s) in the hole with the Dynaplug tool (no glue, no messing with making the hole ready to be plugged). Snip off the end. Pump the tire back up to pressure. Ride on, cowboy. No special activities, no dismounting the tire, no solvents, just poke, pump, proceed.

I ordered mine Friday and received it Monday - Motopumps and USPS got 'er done!

I used the Air Shot pump to top off my tires to 42 and 44 psi (front/rear). The pump handled the task, without a problem, in five minutes from attach the hose to remove the hose. The hose's screw-on connector made an air-tight connection with the tire stem, something I have trouble with using my air chuck. I use a "read&capture" dial gauge. Watching it as I pumped air into the tire, I found the pressure went about 2+ psi over the "stopped the pump" reading. Release the reading and the new reading, after about 30 seconds, was the expected reading. It's a minor point, but I suggest just pumping up the tire, stopping the pump, pausing briefly, and then reading the pressure, rather than watching it in real-time.

The pump's construction and function are what I hoped for. I suspect it would put up with a drop on the garage floor from the height limited by the blue coil hose. Saddle height or higher... I'll let someone else test that.  Smile A drop onto reasonably soft ground probably won't hurt the pump. But that's a guess.

The pump itself is as small as reported. But the bag, with the SAE-SAE extension cord, SAE-plug cord, coiled hose, and pump is a package that takes up appreciable space in a tank bag. The best bet is to bag the pump (to keep it dry) and components (to keep them dry and more or less in the same place) separately.

The Dynaplug looks like "ready to do business" gear. Like seat belts, elbow pads, and insurance, I hope I never have to use it. But with them and the pump, I'm not as worried, as I once was, about a puncture while on the road.

I'm headed to my dealer (Hermy's, Port Clinton, PA) this weekend. I'll make sure Hermy sees the pump and Dynaplug, to encourage him to stock them. They're that good.

Think about the packing volume, but think more about not fretting about punctures. Rating:  Thumbsup Thumbsup
« Last Edit: March 20, 2017, 10:57:57 pm by RBEmerson » Logged

It's taken me entirely too long to develop a sense of patience.
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Years Contributed: '07
Motorcycles: 06 GSX1300R LE, 79 CBX.
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« Reply #1 on: March 20, 2017, 11:10:16 pm »

The hump allows for good storage of smaller items.  I have replaced the screws with easy on/off snap rings to gain quick access.
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Ride em if ya got em...
RBEmerson
Repaired but not refurbed
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Reputation 32
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Years Contributed: '07
Motorcycles: '17 FJR 1300ES, (lamented) '03 BMW K1200RS
GPS: Skippack, PA, USA
Miles Typed: 3747

My Photo Gallery


In Witness Relocation...




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« Reply #2 on: April 16, 2017, 05:54:09 pm »

I'm happy to say I found my rear tire flat yesterday. The Air Shot put in about 40 PSI to force air past the leak. Soapy water found a small brad almost in the center of the tread. A pair of pliers pulled the brad out. I used the Dynaplug kit's reamer/cleaner tool to ...um... ream and clean the hole. I jammed a plug/patch into the tire (hint: keep the bike braced to avoid a garage drop), checked for a leak (none found), shaved off the excess plug and cleaned up. With thumbing through the Dynaplug how-to and looking for the leak, total time was an hour. Total work time 15-20 minutes?

I feel a lot better about "what if I get a flat in West Jabip" than before.  Thumbsup Thumbsup
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It's taken me entirely too long to develop a sense of patience.
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