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Topic: Auto dimming face shield  (Read 1553 times)

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David Morrow
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« on: April 02, 2017, 01:26:13 pm »

I'm not sure if this is gear or gadget but here goes... This is from the Newatlas web site. Reasonably priced too.


http://newatlas.com/pinlock-overlay-photochromatic-motorcycle-helmet-visor/48728/


" Photochromatic lenses for eyeglasses have been around for ages, but strangely this tech hasn't gained much momentum in the motorcycle helmet market. Dutch manufacturer Pinlock is attempting to change this with the Overlay, a removable external insert that can change from clear to dark tint in a matter of seconds.

For most motorcyclists, riding in the sun involves either wearing sunglasses under the helmet, or switching to a darker helmet visor. Although the technology to create visors that can auto-adapt to lighting conditions is not new, manufacturers seem to prefer a whole line of products, each with varying tint levels.

Most market-ready examples of photochromatic visors come from Transitions, a company that employs its expertise in eyeglass lenses to create adaptable helmet visors for selected Bell, Lazer and Shoei models. Then there's AGV, with the Italians taking a completely different and more complex path with a battery-powered visor that darkens at the push of a button.

There are some simpler solutions out there as well, in the shape of fog-free inserts with limited light-reactive capabilities. Both Fog City's Hyper Optiks and Pinlock's ProtecTINT are traditional anti-fog membranes that are applied on the inner side of the visor to prevent misting, and will also automatically produce a light tint against the sunlight. Although very practical and useful, they cannot replicate the anti-glare protection of a dark visor, or the comfort it can offer on long journeys under bright conditions.

This is where Pinlock comes in, promising the best of both worlds. The Overlay innovates by going from clear to dark smoke in a matter of seconds, using a photochromatic film with UV protection sandwiched between two polycarbonate layers with anti-scratch coating. It is placed on the outside surface of the helmet visor, and it requires Pinlock's tear-off pins to secure in place. The pins are included in the standard package, along with the special Pin tool for installation in helmets that are not factory-equipped with Pinlock pins.

The Overlay offers several advantages, like easy mounting and removal in a matter of seconds, and the ability to use it interchangeably on different helmets. Installing the pins on the visor also allows for the use of Pinlock anti-fog inserts. This setup is far more practical than relying on sticky edges to keep the lenses in place.

The Pinlock Overlay is available for 99.95 (around US$106) for several models of AGV, Bell, BMW, HJC, LS2, Nexx, Schuberth, Shark, Shoei and Scorpion helmets. The company suggests that more models could be added depending on demand, yet chances are that many helmet owners may find a visor similarly shaped with theirs in the above list. There's also plans for the development of a 3D Overlay for helmets with spherically shaped (3D) visors, plus more color options. "

Source: Pinlock

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« Reply #1 on: April 03, 2017, 09:16:11 pm »

I'll be interested to hear how it works out of the lab and away from the marketing dept. I had a brief encounter with photochromic glasses. Money down the rat hole. I have a Pinlock insert in my Shoei GT-Air (included with the helmet). If I juggle and jiggle it just the right way, the bottom edges seals and the top edge doesn't. Or I can jiggle it the wrong way and watch the insert fog up as my warm, humid breath goes in through the gap that used to be at the top of the insert. IMHO, that's 0 for 2. YMMV

Many helmets now include a good built-in sun visor. Kinda removes the need for a photochromic insert, don't ya think?
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« Reply #2 on: April 04, 2017, 02:18:54 pm »

I owned a Lazer Monaco helmet that used that technology.  It had its pluses and minuses.

On the plus side, it did darken nicely...but not enough to get rid of your sunglasses all the time.  

On the minus side, it also cleared to almost...but not quite...clear.  So you did lose some visibility at night, but not much.

The biggest downside to me was when I was riding into the sun.  With the photo-chromatic or auto-dimming face shield, Lazer did away with a drop down sun visor to keep the weight down.  If I'd still had that drop down visor, I could've lowered the drop down visor a bit and added the additional sun blocking I needed.

If given a choice of one or the other...I'd pick a drop down visor over the auto-dimming visor.  Getting both would be nice though.

Chris
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« Reply #3 on: April 04, 2017, 10:59:17 pm »

Having both sounds like an almost good idea. 'Cept the thing will stay slightly dimmed.  IIRC from my glasses, the only fix is extended light heat in an oven. Not so good for plastics...
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« Reply #4 on: April 05, 2017, 01:14:20 pm »

I've had a "transitions" face shield for a few years.  It's outstanding on a nice day.  Horrible in the rain or fog since it darkens in these conditions when you don't want it.  The easy to remove feature of this one is appealing.    
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« Reply #5 on: April 05, 2017, 01:24:14 pm »

I really didn't like having Transition lenses in my eyeglasses. And one of the problems raises a red flag here for me. They note how quickly it darkens in the light. That was no problem with my glasses either. They don't say anything about how quickly it changes from dark back to clear. That was a big problem with the glasses. I don't want a dark shield when I head into a tunnel.

I think the flip down visor is a much better solution. It's simple, mechanical, and you control when it gets dark or light. Of course, you can't add one to a helmet that doesn't already have it.
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« Reply #6 on: April 05, 2017, 09:58:27 pm »

 Bigok
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