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Topic: Big manhole cover - sit down, stand up  (Read 3700 times)

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rajflyboy
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« Reply #20 on: April 16, 2017, 09:42:57 pm »

Oh yes

We all get away with many mistakes

For me it's so easy to let off the throttle in panic situations when many times the outcome will be much better by using more throttle
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« Reply #21 on: April 17, 2017, 12:07:30 pm »

Or at least hold the throttle constant.

It comes back to "you ride like you train (practice)". Spiegel talks about this at great length and in great detail ( Rolleyes ). Some of the reading takes motivation to stay with it, but at the end there should be some a solid understanding of what's happening and how to get to what is desired to happen.

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« Reply #22 on: April 17, 2017, 09:24:08 pm »


Or at least hold the throttle constant.

It comes back to "you ride like you train (practice)". Spiegel talks about this at great length and in great detail ( Rolleyes ). Some of the reading takes motivation to stay with it, but at the end there should be some a solid understanding of what's happening and how to get to what is desired to happen.




Training certainly helped.  The Army requires motorcyclists take the ERC course at each duty station in which you are based.   That was well worth the time
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« Reply #23 on: April 18, 2017, 10:05:23 am »

Well, given all the money the military put into your training, why wouldn't they try to protect the investment?  Wink
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« Reply #24 on: April 18, 2017, 01:46:08 pm »


Well, given all the money the military put into your training, why wouldn't they try to protect the investment?  Wink



True  Thumbsup

And also a nice day off work to ride  Thumbsup
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« Reply #25 on: April 19, 2017, 11:27:45 am »

Too right.

I was out on a semi-work/semi-playtime trip yesterday. Charging around some of the corners with ...um... less than smooth paving, I spent more time putting weight on the pegs. Dunno if it really mattered, but the tires didn't feel like they were trying to depart the scene. Even when I rubbed my toes on the pavement (didn't plan on that).  Bigsmile
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« Reply #26 on: April 20, 2017, 02:23:39 pm »


Too right.

I was out on a semi-work/semi-playtime trip yesterday. Charging around some of the corners with ...um... less than smooth paving, I spent more time putting weight on the pegs. Dunno if it really mattered, but the tires didn't feel like they were trying to depart the scene. Even when I rubbed my toes on the pavement (didn't plan on that).  Bigsmile


I don't mind sliding the rear wheel a bit but I hate tucking the front wheel
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« Reply #27 on: April 20, 2017, 03:50:49 pm »

You mean like this...
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« Reply #28 on: April 20, 2017, 09:06:01 pm »

Good one

Thanks  Thumbsup
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« Reply #29 on: April 21, 2017, 09:20:15 am »

Makes me wonder, though, why he didn't spend time learning to do a panic stop correctly. Woulda saved wear and tear on the bike, suit, and him. In descending order of importance.  Razz

ADDED: I look at a traffic light turning sooner than expected as a chance to do a panic stop (if nobody's in back of me). Washboard, oil, wet paint... it's all there for the learning.  Smile
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« Reply #30 on: April 21, 2017, 02:01:52 pm »

A lot of people don't understand the front brake on a motorcycle

I saw someone recently teaching a kid how to ride a bike.  He told his son to not use much front brake to stop the bike.  
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« Reply #31 on: April 22, 2017, 08:58:19 am »

Well, sure. Hit the front brake too hard and the bike will lift up in the back and might flip over.  

I went bicycle riding with a friend's kids; the bike had disk brakes. The kids kept saying "don't use the front brake or you'll flip over."  
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« Reply #32 on: May 24, 2017, 11:35:18 am »

Interesting situation with the surprise manhole cover and I'm glad you brought it up.  Good discussion too, but there are a couple of things that are important in this example that haven't been mentioned in the thread yet.

The first thing I didn't see was the simple fact that you should never be going so fast that you can't see a hazard like that coming up and have time to react to it.  That may seem obvious, but a lot of motorcyclists tend to roll on the fast side...and most times so fast that even the phenomenal brakes on a motorcycle can't help them when a road hazard pops up.  Double this for night riding where sight distance becomes an issue. Going fast on a motorcycle is an intracultural norm, so there tends to be a lot of peer pressure to ride fast when you've got a bike.  I understand that.  It's fun to really get on the throttle sometimes.  But you have to take responsibility for the fact that when you do get on the throttle, the road comes at you much faster and sometimes you don't have time to even spot (much less react to) a road hazard, particularly in corners where you are typically blind to what's coming up.  Best to go slow into corners, roll on the throttle a wee bit to keep the chassis stable and increase the contact patch, then, once you have a clear sight line to the exit and can see there's no trouble on the road surface, you can really get on the throttle and slingshot out of the turn.

The other thing I haven't seen mentioned yet is something I have first-hand experience with.  I was approaching a speed bump in a parking lot and going all of 5 mph at the time.  I decided to stand up on the bike to help with shock absorption over the bump.  You know what happened?  Take a guess...

...time's up!  I whacked open the throttle and almost threw myself off the back of the bike .  The difference between standing up on a motorcycle and a bicycle is that a bicycle doesn't penalize you for applying leverage force to the right grip to help you stand up.  If you're not aware that you're applying back-force to both motorcycle grips to help yourself stand up, you can easily whack open the throttle and you know the rest.  When you stand up on a motorcycle, if you're not careful of the pressure you're applying to the throttle in your right hand, you might wind up off the bike and on your ass. EEK!
« Last Edit: May 24, 2017, 02:40:19 pm by Fun Dog » Logged

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« Reply #33 on: May 24, 2017, 08:45:52 pm »

Raise over the seat to use your legs as shock absorbers and keep suspension from bottoming. Avoid hitting it if possible, swerving left or right to avoid it. Look where you want to go not at what you're trying to avoid. You will go where you look.
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