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RBEmerson
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« on: September 06, 2018, 11:24:30 pm »

In doing some homework (and vicarious riding) for an SS1000, I've found some points which I'll post FWIW. Warning! I have not done an SS1000 yet. I have done some shorter but still long distance rides. Some of what's listed below comes from that experience.

The area that is done, at least in YT videos, or not done, is preparation. In some cases, there's a list of all the cool stuff that will be strapped on or stuffed into panniers. Most of the lists appear to be reasonable.

I do wonder about lugging a small tool box, though. Any breakdown needing to get those tools out will probably end the attempt or, worse, create a nearly impossible time crunch. Better to carry a bunch of personal phone numbers or be ready to talk to U-Haul, etc. A quicky tire patch kit with a compressor does make sense (IMHO one-time CO2 carts are a gamble while a compressor is almost a sure bet - murphy aside).

Despite loading up lots of gear, there's a glaring error: maps. I don't recall seeing paper maps in any video I've watched. There's a lot of reliance on GPS'. In one video, the rider was plagued with the power plug constantly falling out. More about that shortly. My Zumo 660 has tried to send me up cow trails, into military facilities, and places even locals don't know about. And this with routes carefully laid out with BaseCamp. I now use either Waze - useful but too unstable and given crashing - or Google Maps - no police warnings and less useful traffic info. The 660 is still carried, but now serving as a short range moving map useful seeing what the road, up to about 1/4 mi away, is doing. I also use it to monitor true speed, and a true odometer, as well as the summary average speed, time moving, total trip time, etc. Large scale maps (better detail, not a small scale map of all of the US East Coast on one sheet of paper) act as a backup if everything goes dark.

One rider apparently had a route card for the entire 1000 miles, despite a distinctly complex route. I use route cards that cover a smaller route segment, with card #2 instructions overlap with the end of card #1, etc. This is one item that can be generated by BaseCamp. Changing cards on the fly is not wise. Cards set up for  gas stop to gas stop are easier unless using lots of turns.

Note all tolls on the route. Either carry the right transponder (EZ-Pass, SunPass, etc.) or make up a bundle of toll money where it's easy to get out. Fumbling for (and dropping) a wallet is so not happening. Oh, don't lose paper tickets. Having to pay for the tolls from the furthest point on the turnpike to the desired exit, all due to a lost ticket, is ...um... unwise. Watching a SS1000 attempt in Europe, there was no mention of buying the appropriate toll stickers for Switzerland and Austria. Bad idea. Very bad idea. Get pulled over, on an autobahn, for some reason and the right sticker is missing... the fine just jumped up. A lot.  

Another item that's repeated frequently: the gear's on board, but the rider doesn't  change jackets, liners, rain gear until they've begun to complain about being cold, hot, and/or wet. All of which create fatigue and reduce morale. Related to that is little preparation to clean the windscreen, face shield, or camera lens. It  doesn't take much more than an hour or two, on a summer night, to get a sense of how long it takes to make bug splats limit visibility. Why is this simple lesson forgotten?? I carry a can of Plexus and microfiber cloths.

Some people mention a camelback filled with water or bottles of water. Water alone doesn't do the best job of re-hydrating. Try this one:
Six (6) level teaspoons of Sugar. Half (1/2) level teaspoon of Salt. One Litre of clean drinking or boiled water and then cooled - 5 cupfuls (each cup about 200 ml.)
Take more sugar and salt to make another load of fluid.
Additionally, particularly in situations of high fluid loss rates, eat bananas. They provide potassium and other trace minerals lost by sweating.

Some people rely on coffee - a diuretic (you never buy coffee, just rent it) and caffeine is good for a quick boost followed by a caffeine crash. Ditto for Coke, etc.. A load of Big Macs, and fries is a recipe for disaster. The burger, or almost any restaurant food, will be loaded with salt (enhances taste). Fries? A salt shaker sitting on fried potatoes. Big doses of each are not a good idea. Additionally, blood is sent to the stomach to digest the meal. The brain doesn't get quite the same amount, which contributes to slowing down after a big meal.

Sugar is good for a boost but that's followed by a crash. All that salt leads to dehydration.  Small amounts of sugar and even smaller amounts of salt is a good thing - all things in moderation.
 
OK, gear, navigation, and dehydration are, I hope, sorted out. Two other prep items are not reported. A practice 100+ mile run with the full kit will show what's going to fall off, become unmanageable, or what's missing from the kit. Do route cards cover the info needed? How are GPS or music or media kit working? How do ear plugs hold up over 2+ hours? In short, is everything working?

Here's the howling huge prep item that seems to be almost willfully ignored: sleep! "I've been up, getting ready, for the last X hours." "I couldn't sleep last night. I got maybe 3-4 hours of sleep." All of this before an enforced 24 hour "all-nighter"? I haven't done my SS1000 yet, but I've done 24+ hours more than once, and been short on sleep before leaving for a flight ending with X hours of driving after getting through customs, getting bags, getting the rent-a-racer... When I get where I'm going, I crash hard. I understand not getting much sleep before a  "I hope I can pull this off" event. Bank as much sleep as possible before The Big Trip. Watching the videos, riders all seem to hit a wall around 3/4 way through the trip. Hopefully being up on sleep will at least keep that wall a little lower.

1K of I-95 isn't as much fun as US 301, US 17 and FL A1A. Guess which one favors keeping running time down. Remember the reports, in other posts here, that IBA can disallow a claim where it's clear the ride was done at insane speeds. And that some small towns, where the local sport is watching the local traffic light turn from yellow to yellow, might just harbor enthusiastic speed control enforcement.  I'm just saying...

Finally, search on YouTube for SS1000 videos. There are people on cruisers, scooters(!), big and small dual purpose bikes, serious crotch rockets... if it's got two wheels and a motor, it's probably in there. Take notes on what seems reasonable, what doesn't, and how the riders handle the trip.

EDIT: General tightening and editing
« Last Edit: September 09, 2018, 04:54:06 pm by RBEmerson » Logged

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« Reply #1 on: September 07, 2018, 06:19:55 am »

A couple of things. If your motorcycle is dependable and has good tires, NEXT. Being on the road nonstop is probably safer for the bike than putting around town or through the country. I'm so old fashioned my GPS comes from AAA. You know, the ones without need of a battery!! Paper in other words. Besides, I usually know where I'm going. As I've written in the past, if I was intentionally going to do 1,000 mile run for a license plate frame, I'd pick a 500 mile stretch on the freeway and know where the gas stops were and get it over with.


The big deal is not where to go, or getting lost, or having a mechanical issue, it is can one stay alert and safe.
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« Reply #2 on: September 07, 2018, 07:47:37 am »

Doing 1000 miles in 24 hours, on the roads that we have today in most of the US, is easy.  Sit there, twist that, go, come back.  Easy.   Tires rarely fail.  Bikes rarely break down.  Gear for almost any weather conditions. Easy.  Doesnt take a lot of planning and preparation.  Doesnt even take anywhere near 24 hours when using highways.   Average 60 mph for 17 hours and youve got it.  Leaves 7 hours to rest, take breaks, or even sleep if you need it.   The biggest enemy....boredom.  But even that is pretty easy to overcome with a pleasant route and something to listen to along the way. Soreness and fatigue?  10 minute breaks every 100 miles or so and some pain reliever along the way (before you get to hurting). There are much greater challenges than the SS1000.
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« Reply #3 on: September 07, 2018, 04:16:53 pm »

     ^

Yeah, what K wrote. I posted recently that I rode from So Calif. to Albuquerque, 730 miles, in ten hours. Two gas stops at 240 miles apart and one stop to water plants, take a stretch. 73 MPH average. Go 80 to 85 MPH and get on with business. I got where I was going before dinner and had time to visit.


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RBEmerson
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« Reply #4 on: September 07, 2018, 06:28:08 pm »

I forgot another prep item that either fell through the cracks or was another last minute sleep robber. Last minute oil changes abound. Chain tweaking shows up, too. Tire pressure checks, checking brake, turn, and even headlight lights at least don't show up as part of the prep check list. Tread check? Brake check? Hah!

One other check was rare: weather. I found a couple of "rained out at the start" videos, but only one serious check of forecasts along the route.

Overall, I'm surprised by how many people seem to get some stuff together and launch themselves down the road. Usually there's a lot of whining in there. I wonder why...  Wink
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« Reply #5 on: September 09, 2018, 04:33:30 pm »

I regularly do a 400 mi. day or 1,000 mi. weekend so the bike is not the weakest link.
Therefore it must be me!  The desire to stop and smell the roses (aka eat & take pictures)
or my own exhaustion (mental and knees) are the limiting factor.  But I still wanna.
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« Reply #6 on: September 10, 2018, 09:46:32 am »

IBA Rule #5

http://www.ironbuttrally.com/tech/aow.cfm
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« Reply #7 on: September 10, 2018, 10:49:10 am »

I did my first (unofficial) one by accident.  

I was on the way home from Jasper & Banff and planned to take two days to get home from the Missoula Area.    Got to Rapid City, and the weather was so nice, I kept going.   Got to Sioux Falls, and was only 3 more hours from home.    Ended up being 1200 miles in 19 hours.    Looked back at my camera and realized that I'd actually done a BunBurner 1500 based on where I was earlier the prior afternoon.

If I were going to do an official ride - I wouldn't be worried about the actual riding at all.   I'm confident I can crank off 1,000 miles bascially anytime (using mostly freeways) with no different ride prep than I do for my typical 500 mile day ride.   Where I'd be focused, is the details of the documentation.   That's what I'd screw-up, for sure....
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« Reply #8 on: September 10, 2018, 11:17:25 am »

Somewhere in there is the line between "use it 'til it breaks" and "I didn't notice that before" QC. Most of the time it's jump on the ol' iron horse and ride it like ya stole it. It's hardly a hardship to at least check the obvious stuff (oil, pads, tires). And hardly a hardship to make an effort to see if the ol' iron horse is about to throw a shoe (wonky steering bearing, chain, or something else that matters). After all, it's one more good excuse to ride, cowboy, ride.  Bigsmile

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RBEmerson
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« Reply #9 on: September 10, 2018, 11:47:44 am »


I did my first (unofficial) one by accident.  
[/...]
If I were going to do an official ride - I wouldn't be worried about the actual riding at all.   I'm confident I can crank off 1,000 miles basically anytime (using mostly freeways) with no different ride prep than I do for my typical 500 mile day ride.   Where I'd be focused, is the details of the documentation.   That's what I'd screw-up, for sure....
Meh - for some people it's easy-peasy. Ride those distances +/- regularly - BTDT. For folks who don't, not so easy. No surprise there.

BTW check out 40 Times Around's YT channel. He's a GS rider who does some off-road riding. There are videos where he drones, but others have useful ideas.

I'm not sure I see the problem with receipts. IBA spells out what has to be done at the start and finish. In between, make sure the gas receipt has the address and time of day. Write down the GPS odometer, and TOD if the ticket doesn't have it. Stuff it in your wallet and move on.

Speaking of the bike's odometer, changing tire size, manufacturer error, etc. throw off the readings. GPS distance is believable, odos not so much.  Unless the route means lots of twists and turns in a tunnel; the GPS will draw a straight line from where it lost the satellites and found them again. DAMHIK
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« Reply #10 on: September 10, 2018, 09:24:21 pm »


....make sure the gas receipt has the address and time of day. Write down the GPS odometer, and TOD if the ticket doesn't have it. Stuff it in your wallet and move on.



Im just saying, for me, this is where Id screw up and lose a receipt, or the time stamp would be missing or something and Id end up DQd on a technicality.  
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« Reply #11 on: September 11, 2018, 06:48:24 am »




Im just saying, for me, this is where Id screw up and lose a receipt, or the time stamp would be missing or something and Id end up DQd on a technicality.  



Then do a point to point route....all you need is the start and finish information/receipts.  Bank receipts from an ATM work too.
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