Pages: [1] 2  All   Go Down
Print

Topic: Staying healthy, affordably, on the road?  (Read 1721 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
HotPursuit
*

Reputation 4
Offline Offline

Motorcycles: 1996 Honda VF750C Magna, and 2003 Honda VFR800 Interceptor
GPS: High Desert, SoCal
Miles Typed: 49

My Photo Gallery





Ignore
« on: December 08, 2019, 06:00:25 pm »

I'm planning a longer 2-4 week trip around the Southwest, and in the interest of saving money, I plan on camping for most of the trip.  Also, in the interest of eating better, I plan to minimize eating at restaurants and gas stations, and instead try to eat fresher (and better) from grocery stores.

As far as a mess kit, I'm bringing a backpack with a hydration bladder (water w/ electrolyte tablets), a water bottle (1L plain water), Jet Boil (with 2 cup pot/coffee press), a small skillet*, a coffee mug, a collapsible bowl, flatware, and a plate*.  I may consider bringing a small insulated lunch bag so I can salvage left overs.  *Space permitting

When I normally camp, it's usually oatmeal and coffee for breakfast, which I think I'm going to stick with.

For lunch, I'm thinking I'm going to try to pick up grab and go salads, or maybe find delis or sub shops.  Again, grocery stores usually have pretty affordable grab and go lunch options.

And then dinner back at a campsite.  I'm thinking I can ditch the skillet and plate if I stick to soup/chowder/chili/ramen for dinner.  I'm not big on preparing courses while camping.  Car camping, we splurge a little with the typical camp food fair, but I'm obviously not taking an SUV.  I think if I'm really in the mood for a good meal, I'll just find a local restaurant.

Usually when I travel, I eat out a lot, and I eat a lot of garbage, especially when camping (pizza, burgers, grilled cheese, etc.).  Last trip I took, I tried to replace my lunch with the SlimFast Meal replacement cookies, but they wouldn't last until dinner, so I was still eating some other kind of junk food snack during the day.  I think I'd be better off to just eat a better lunch.

I also usually end up buying at least one Gatorade/Powerade, and multiple energy drinks per day.  I know Camelbak makes caffeinated electrolyte tablets that won't make your hydration bladder nasty.  I figure if I'll be sipping on that all day, I can skip the sports and energy drinks.

It's real easy to fall into the trap of eating fast food and gas station food on the road.  Considering the potential length of this trip, neither my wallet, nor my health could afford either.

I don't take vitamins or supplements usually, with the exception of Airborne, when I'm sick or flying.  I think it may behoove me to add a glass of Airborne to my morning routine.

I typically don't keep any sort of exercise regimen on the road either, but I'm reconsidering that also...  The Art of Manliness has a playground based exercise routine I might try, considering playgrounds are pretty abundant, and usually pretty vacant early in the morning.

Anyone else have any suggestions/tips/ideas regarding trying to eat/stay healthy on the road?  And how to do so affordably?
« Last Edit: December 08, 2019, 07:54:33 pm by HotPursuit » Logged
Sport-Touring
Advertisement
*


Remove Advertisements

skihor
*

Reputation 2
Offline Offline

Motorcycles: '02 1800 goldwing, '93 goldwing, '99 kx 500,'03 Concours / '72 Electra glide / '01 Sportster
Miles Typed: 22

My Photo Gallery




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: December 08, 2019, 07:48:33 pm »

For lunches I carry Flour tortillas and get stuff to put in them. Another favorite of mine is to buy a foot-long at Subway and eat half for lunch and the other half for dinner. That's 2 meals for $7 or $8. hard to beat that price. Also not necessarily healthy but many taverns have Taco Tuesday or... whatever. have a beer and a meal on the cheap.
Logged
Biking Sailor
*

Reputation 56
Offline Offline

Years Contributed: '10
Years Supported: '11
Motorcycles: A Griso, an FJR, an R1200GS, a WR and my wife's FJ09 (she looks good riding it!)
GPS: Edmond, OK
Miles Typed: 851

My Photo Gallery


Fast and smooth, or you will be caught!




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: December 08, 2019, 09:35:13 pm »

I've found when traveling on the bike a few staples that are easy to pack and are relatively healthy are jerky, dry cereal like Cheerios, raw veggies like carrots/broccoli/cauliflower, apples/oranges, dried fruit like raisins/cranberries, and nuts. I'm also a regular consumer of good protein bars, even when not traveling, as they have good calorie content and pack easy and small. Tortillas and peanut butter have sufficed as a good dinner on many occasions.

I used to spend a lot on drinks, until my wife taught me to fill a large water bottle when at gas stops. Of course, the morning doesn't begin without coffee, but long trips are better if you can wean yourself off caffeine before hand. Remember staying hydrated is just as important as calories.

What works for me best is to start the food routine well before leaving on the trip to get your body used to what you are going to be eating, shopping at grocery stores and splitting large packages of bulk items into small zip lock bags to control calorie intake. I learned a lot about food doing off shore sailboat racing where we prepared individual daily food kits.

All that said, what is traveling to different areas without sampling local foods?
Logged

"Your Guzzi isn't here to do your bidding, you're here to do her bidding."  -- Orson
"when you're riding a Guzzi you know you're riding a MOTORBIKE and not some sits-down-to-pee hairdryer with a wheel at each end." -- Pete
Advertisement



zer0netgain
*

Reputation 28
Offline Offline

Motorcycles: 2018 BMW R1200RS
GPS: VA/TN
Miles Typed: 6397

My Photo Gallery





Ignore
« Reply #3 on: December 09, 2019, 05:39:49 am »

Depends on what you mean by ďon the road.Ē

For motorcycle trips, exercise (other than stretching) isnít a high priority as riding involves a fair amount of energy.  At the least, I like to get brisk walks in...treadmill use at hotels if available while catching up with news and stuff on YouTube or podcasts.  I suppose the same applies on other forms of travel.  Iíve been out of the gym for a while now, so weight training isnít a concern (which is good as itíd mandate packing protein powders and stuff).  Again, a gym chain with branches everywhere can solve most issues.

On diet, well, Iím ďluckyĒ in that Iím gluten sensitive and largely live gluten free.  Iím used to not having options at most places.  Normally, I pack some protein bars so I have a fall back position.  For me if I stay in a hotel that offers ďfree breakfast,Ē I really need them to offer healthy options (which more do nowadays).  A couple of hard boiled eggs, a cup or two of coffee, and some fruit does me fine.  Maybe Iíll have some scrambled eggs or sausage/bacon.  No juice (high sugar concentration), and I donít dare touch the waffle maker (last time I treated myself it knocked me on my ass).

On motorcycle trips, itís easy.  Breakfast bar at the hotel if I can safely eat what they offer as Iím already paying for it.  I normally donít eat during the day so the food doesnít make me dopey.  This is where the protein bars come in handy.  I normally pack two 4 packs of protein shakes in my gear and top off via a trip to WalMart every other day.  I will either buy something to eat at a grocery store or opt for an affordable meal near the end of the day or after I get to my destination.

On other fronts, I have all my supplements presorted in pill trays for the time Iíll be gone.  If I canít fit it all in, I take the bottles of stuff easy to track (evening meds), and I bring a couple of used pill bottles to carry stuff I need for the day (set them up the night before).  When I travel, I pack all meds I typically need for allergy, sinus, chest congestion, etc. to the degree I expect to need them.  Basically, anything thatís your ďgo toĒ drug(s) when you feel a cold coming on so you can knock it down ASAP.  You donít want to look for a pharmacy to get what you need after you need it.

That last bit I learned on a River Cruise with mom in Germany last September.  Exposed to cigarette smoke, my issues kicked in and I got the crud...which mom then got...and someone on board (if not several passengers) had the crud from people who were on the plane with them from the USA.  I packed lots of Mucinex, but not enough for two people for two weeks.  They donít sell Mucinex in Germany.  Fortunately, we explained what it was and the pharmacist got us something that did the same job but was a different drug.  Itís also hard to determine what you need when all the labeling is in German and Google Translate (while translating the ingredients) doesnít give you an idea of if it will do the job for you.

On that river cruise, the ďfitness roomĒ was largely a joke but adequate given the small size of the ship.  I did 90 minutes every morning on the treadmill (8+ km) to stave off the impact of what I ate.  I was also fortunate that portion sizes were very small but by the time you went from soup to nuts, you felt full.  All I had to do was avoid breads and make smart choices at breakfast (which was always buffet style).
« Last Edit: December 09, 2019, 05:44:37 am by zer0netgain » Logged

jay547
Junior Member
*

Reputation 252
Offline Offline

Years Supported: '11
Motorcycles: 2015 Yamaha FJ-09, 2019 Honda CRF450L, 2002 Honda CR250, 1973 Yamaha AT-3
GPS: Northeastern, OK
Miles Typed: 2932

My Photo Gallery





Ignore
« Reply #4 on: December 09, 2019, 08:41:44 am »


I've found when traveling on the bike a few staples that are easy to pack and are relatively healthy are jerky, dry cereal like Cheerios, raw veggies like carrots/broccoli/cauliflower, apples/oranges, dried fruit like raisins/cranberries, and nuts. I'm also a regular consumer of good protein bars, even when not traveling, as they have good calorie content and pack easy and small. Tortillas and peanut butter have sufficed as a good dinner on many occasions.

I used to spend a lot on drinks, until my wife taught me to fill a large water bottle when at gas stops. Of course, the morning doesn't begin without coffee, but long trips are better if you can wean yourself off caffeine before hand. Remember staying hydrated is just as important as calories.

What works for me best is to start the food routine well before leaving on the trip to get your body used to what you are going to be eating, shopping at grocery stores and splitting large packages of bulk items into small zip lock bags to control calorie intake. I learned a lot about food doing off shore sailboat racing where we prepared individual daily food kits.

All that said, what is traveling to different areas without sampling local foods?


You ain't no Okie. Turn in your Okie card.  Razz
Logged

It's not the fall that hurts, it's when you hit the ground.
Bounce
FJR1300
*

Reputation 92
Offline Offline

GPS: USA
Miles Typed: 1271

My Photo Gallery



WWW

Ignore
« Reply #5 on: December 09, 2019, 09:01:34 am »

My list is simple so it's easy to do and plan.

Low carbs, fat, and sugar.
Water water water (without additives). Unless it's extremely hot, riding isn't the physical thing that hard work is, so electrolyte replacement can easily be over done. Best to do water and ensure your diet is balanced to get those from your meals.
Logged

FJR-Tips.org

IBA #285
Biking Sailor
*

Reputation 56
Offline Offline

Years Contributed: '10
Years Supported: '11
Motorcycles: A Griso, an FJR, an R1200GS, a WR and my wife's FJ09 (she looks good riding it!)
GPS: Edmond, OK
Miles Typed: 851

My Photo Gallery


Fast and smooth, or you will be caught!




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: December 09, 2019, 11:25:42 am »




You ain't no Okie. Turn in your Okie card.  Razz


I'm not sure whether that is good or bad?  Headscratch

Hey, I eat lots of dried dead animals (jerky). That should help, right?   Bigsmile
Logged

"Your Guzzi isn't here to do your bidding, you're here to do her bidding."  -- Orson
"when you're riding a Guzzi you know you're riding a MOTORBIKE and not some sits-down-to-pee hairdryer with a wheel at each end." -- Pete
Biking Sailor
*

Reputation 56
Offline Offline

Years Contributed: '10
Years Supported: '11
Motorcycles: A Griso, an FJR, an R1200GS, a WR and my wife's FJ09 (she looks good riding it!)
GPS: Edmond, OK
Miles Typed: 851

My Photo Gallery


Fast and smooth, or you will be caught!




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: December 09, 2019, 12:13:02 pm »

What works best for me is regular short stops, about 100 miles apart or half tank of gas, where I eat a small snack and drink some water. That keeps me fresher, with more stable blood sugar levels for alertness and energy, and I stay better hydrated. If I manage the calorie intake of the snacks right, I never get hungry throughout the day.
Logged

"Your Guzzi isn't here to do your bidding, you're here to do her bidding."  -- Orson
"when you're riding a Guzzi you know you're riding a MOTORBIKE and not some sits-down-to-pee hairdryer with a wheel at each end." -- Pete
Bounce
FJR1300
*

Reputation 92
Offline Offline

GPS: USA
Miles Typed: 1271

My Photo Gallery



WWW

Ignore
« Reply #8 on: December 10, 2019, 09:33:31 am »


What works best for me is regular short stops, about 100 miles apart or half tank of gas, where I eat a small snack and drink some water. That keeps me fresher, with more stable blood sugar levels for alertness and energy, and I stay better hydrated. If I manage the calorie intake of the snacks right, I never get hungry throughout the day.


I do that while the wheels are turning. Hydration system and snacks in the tank bag (low fat/carb/sugars).
Logged

FJR-Tips.org

IBA #285
rajflyboy
Member
*

Reputation 365
Offline Offline

Motorcycles: BMW
Miles Typed: 1614

My Photo Gallery





Ignore
« Reply #9 on: December 10, 2019, 09:28:05 pm »

Go to bar around 1:30 in morning

Hook up with cutie.   Stay at her place for the night.  Make sure to take Fitbit off.   Enjoy the stay.
Logged

"The Dream is free The Hustle is sold separatelyĒ
HotPursuit
*

Reputation 4
Offline Offline

Motorcycles: 1996 Honda VF750C Magna, and 2003 Honda VFR800 Interceptor
GPS: High Desert, SoCal
Miles Typed: 49

My Photo Gallery





Ignore
« Reply #10 on: December 11, 2019, 03:18:20 am »

Go to bar around 1:30 in morning

Hook up with cutie.   Stay at her place for the night.  Make sure to take Fitbit off.   Enjoy the stay.
*adds contreceptives to packing list*

Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
Logged
rajflyboy
Member
*

Reputation 365
Offline Offline

Motorcycles: BMW
Miles Typed: 1614

My Photo Gallery





Ignore
« Reply #11 on: December 11, 2019, 07:06:37 am »


*adds contreceptives to packing list*

Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk


 Lol Bigsmile
Logged

"The Dream is free The Hustle is sold separatelyĒ
slvrsprint
Junior Member
*

Reputation 28
Offline Offline

Motorcycles: '13 Tiger 800
GPS: Endicott, NY
Miles Typed: 370

My Photo Gallery




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: December 11, 2019, 05:36:20 pm »

Why eat better on the road than when at home?

We spent a week at the beach recently.  Every morning, there would be fat guys jogging on the sand.  I know I don't look great in my Speedo, but I'm not going to bounce my fat down the beach.  One week of that before going back to my sofa ain't gonna do anything but trigger the big one.  

The same with food.  My diet concerns have to do with being comfortable and regular.  I cut down on caffeine.  The rebound of the coffee high leaves me sleepy a few hours later.  I could have an energy drink or I could not have the caffeine in the first place.  Tea bags are easy to carry, so I have one a day.  That works far better for me.  It's cheaper, too.  Far a snack, I'll have granola bars with water.  They help keep things flowing.  No soda.  

Dinner might be supermarket deli food or bread cheese and red wine.  Occasionally a restaurant.  

Logged

IBA #8027
rajflyboy
Member
*

Reputation 365
Offline Offline

Motorcycles: BMW
Miles Typed: 1614

My Photo Gallery





Ignore
« Reply #13 on: December 11, 2019, 06:45:37 pm »


Why eat better on the road than when at home?

We spent a week at the beach recently.  Every morning, there would be fat guys jogging on the sand.  I know I don't look great in my Speedo, but I'm not going to bounce my fat down the beach.  One week of that before going back to my sofa ain't gonna do anything but trigger the big one.  

The same with food.  My diet concerns have to do with being comfortable and regular.  I cut down on caffeine.  The rebound of the coffee high leaves me sleepy a few hours later.  I could have an energy drink or I could not have the caffeine in the first place.  Tea bags are easy to carry, so I have one a day.  That works far better for me.  It's cheaper, too.  Far a snack, I'll have granola bars with water.  They help keep things flowing.  No soda.  

Dinner might be supermarket deli food or bread cheese and red wine.  Occasionally a restaurant.  




Speedos ainít bad.   Now those banana hammicks I just do not like.
Logged

"The Dream is free The Hustle is sold separatelyĒ
jay547
Junior Member
*

Reputation 252
Offline Offline

Years Supported: '11
Motorcycles: 2015 Yamaha FJ-09, 2019 Honda CRF450L, 2002 Honda CR250, 1973 Yamaha AT-3
GPS: Northeastern, OK
Miles Typed: 2932

My Photo Gallery





Ignore
« Reply #14 on: December 11, 2019, 08:09:51 pm »

In order to stay healthy on the road, one would have to already be healthy. I'm not, so it's Waffle House for me.
Logged

It's not the fall that hurts, it's when you hit the ground.
rajflyboy
Member
*

Reputation 365
Offline Offline

Motorcycles: BMW
Miles Typed: 1614

My Photo Gallery





Ignore
« Reply #15 on: December 12, 2019, 06:36:16 am »


In order to stay healthy on the road, one would have to already be healthy. I'm not, so it's Waffle House for me.


We gotta love Jay  Thumbsup
Logged

"The Dream is free The Hustle is sold separatelyĒ
Blue is Best
Light is right
*

Reputation 249
Offline Offline

Motorcycles: 2012 FJR1300 & 2016 Bandit 1250
GPS: Rio Rancho, NM
Miles Typed: 2219

My Photo Gallery


Blue motorcycles are fastest




Ignore
« Reply #16 on: December 17, 2019, 10:52:46 am »

There are very affordable camping sites that have showers and laundry. Nice people too. I buy spray stink sweet (cologne) at the Dollar store for my trips for a day or two that we may wild camp and miss the shower for a night.

You are on the right path on soup and such. Most times we have one meal per day at a restaurant. Sometimes not. I like coffee, oat meal, soup and my deluxe mixed nuts. I always carry at least one quart of Gatorade/similar in the tank bag. When I run out I use the qt jar for water at camp.

Of course, my FJR and Bandit (after I set it up) has the room for everything I need.

Logged

Past bikes: Dirt- '74 MX360, SC500 x 2, '77 YZ400, '78 YZ400, '83 CR250, '85 CR250, '86 CR250   
 Street- '74 S3400, H1500, '72 H2750 x 2, '78 GS1000C, GS1000EC x 2, '80 GS1000S, '00 1200 Bandit, '05 FJR1300, '07 ZX14, '06 FJR1300(2 wks), '12 FJR1300
micah2074
Itís good to be the king.
*

Reputation 38
Offline Offline

Motorcycles: FJ-09, YZF600R, Nighthawk 700 S
Miles Typed: 93

My Photo Gallery





Ignore
« Reply #17 on: December 19, 2019, 02:53:35 pm »

meh.. I eat gas station hotdogs, sleep where I can and enjoy smelling like the "road". My one "want" is a clean place to $#!?.
I've found that TA's and Love's usually have a pretty clean place to have a sit.
Logged
rajflyboy
Member
*

Reputation 365
Offline Offline

Motorcycles: BMW
Miles Typed: 1614

My Photo Gallery





Ignore
« Reply #18 on: December 20, 2019, 09:21:08 pm »


meh.. I eat gas station hotdogs, sleep where I can and enjoy smelling like the "road". My one "want" is a clean place to $#!?.
I've found that TA's and Love's usually have a pretty clean place to have a sit.


Ainít that the damn truth  Thumbsup
Logged

"The Dream is free The Hustle is sold separatelyĒ
jay547
Junior Member
*

Reputation 252
Offline Offline

Years Supported: '11
Motorcycles: 2015 Yamaha FJ-09, 2019 Honda CRF450L, 2002 Honda CR250, 1973 Yamaha AT-3
GPS: Northeastern, OK
Miles Typed: 2932

My Photo Gallery





Ignore
« Reply #19 on: December 20, 2019, 10:54:23 pm »



I've found that TA's and Love's usually have a pretty clean place to have a sit.


Casey's are generally pretty clean, if you have them in the area. Avoid Quik Trip and Kum and Go.
Logged

It's not the fall that hurts, it's when you hit the ground.
Pages: [1] 2  All   Go Up
Print
Jump to:  



ST.N

Copyright © 2001 - 2013 Sport-Touring.Net.
All rights reserved.

 
SimplePortal 2.3.1 © 2008-2009, SimplePortal