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Topic: Noob Question - How Are You All Planning Long Trips?  (Read 2278 times)

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« Reply #20 on: August 07, 2021, 09:45:58 am »


I guess where I'm still a bit baffled is, if you do your research and map out back roads that involve a lot of turns, exits, and road changes, what's the best way to ensure you stay on track?  In cycling there are queue sheets you can print out but they're still a PITA and it's really easy to miss your turn or exit.  I guess I could simply get the clear map pocket.


Sometimes I'll slab it to a destination then ride those roads. Spend more time at the location(s) instead of the slab but slab gets you distance over time (so there's more time for the better, local roads).

Tank bag with map window. But I quit doing that when I got a GPS. I have the paper map as a backup but put critical turns on 3x5 cards (in the window). After each card target is reached, it gets moved to the back and the next one is visible. I rely on the paper maps for planning, the GPS for overall, and the 3x5 as reminders of turns.

Don't get bogged down in the distractions. Riding is Job #1.

Music? I listen all the time. BUT (big butt here) I use custom-molded ear monitors that double as hearing protection. By putting the audio straight into my ears, I can turn the volume down to just a tick above OFF and it's still easier to hear (and better quality) that helmet speakers blasting full volume to get past ear plugs... AND it's better for your hearing health. The trick is to have it turned way down as background so you can still hear what it going on around you.
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« Reply #21 on: August 07, 2021, 12:43:53 pm »

On my GPS, I program in a sequence of the small towns on the route I semi-plan and just go point to point over and over again. And set it to avoid highways and unpaved roads (if on a sport touring bike, which I turn avoid unpaved roads off when exploring on the T7).

If situations change, it is easy to change destinations and avoidances. Just pull over and take a break to change your route.
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« Reply #22 on: August 07, 2021, 01:19:34 pm »




Sometimes I'll slab it to a destination then ride those roads. Spend more time at the location(s) instead of the slab but slab gets you distance over time (so there's more time for the better, local roads).

Tank bag with map window. But I quit doing that when I got a GPS. I have the paper map as a backup but put critical turns on 3x5 cards (in the window). After each card target is reached, it gets moved to the back and the next one is visible. I rely on the paper maps for planning, the GPS for overall, and the 3x5 as reminders of turns.

Don't get bogged down in the distractions. Riding is Job #1.

Music? I listen all the time. BUT (big butt here) I use custom-molded ear monitors that double as hearing protection. By putting the audio straight into my ears, I can turn the volume down to just a tick above OFF and it's still easier to hear (and better quality) that helmet speakers blasting full volume to get past ear plugs... AND it's better for your hearing health. The trick is to have it turned way down as background so you can still hear what it going on around you.



Yes, sir.   I use the custom molded ear plugs now on every ride.   Hearing loss isn't fun.  Used to work on jets in the Marine Corps, used to play the drums...I'm probably going to wearing hearing aids at some point but I'm doing what I can to avoid it.   Riding is a lot more enjoyable without the constant drone of wind noise, for me anyways.   Appreciate the input!
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« Reply #23 on: August 07, 2021, 03:04:22 pm »

Hearing loss prevention is a given. But I love how when riders first wear ear plugs they are amazed at how much longer they can ride without fatigue setting in.

My issue is that after the 4-5th day of stuffing ear plugs into my ears, my ears start to rebel. Some day I'll research a better solution, but for now, it works well enough.
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« Reply #24 on: August 07, 2021, 03:05:11 pm »

A thought occurred to me. We all travel different so one answer will never be right for everyone related to planning for a long trip. When looking at a week or ten days then a destination in mind is always how I do a long trip. I have never just got on the bike and taken off not knowing where I was going.     Nuts     A trip to visit the redwoods up the coast, a trip to Reg 1 meeting, a trip
Reg 2 meeting, a trip to Mt Rushmore, a trip to the Nat Parks in Utah and Arizona and so on will dictate my route. I always want green/scenic and curvy roads. After all this is a SPORT touring site. I use the freeway to make time through boring country and then the best roads for scenery and sport when I get to my day's destination.

I've been asked to go across the country several times but that doesn't excite me as much as daily destinations in beautiful country. Which can include 200 or 300 miles of freeway. At eighty mph that's only five hours max(includes a lunch). That still leaves many hours for site seeing and relaxation.
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« Reply #25 on: August 08, 2021, 09:36:47 am »


Hearing loss prevention is a given. But I love how when riders first wear ear plugs they are amazed at how much longer they can ride without fatigue setting in.

My issue is that after the 4-5th day of stuffing ear plugs into my ears, my ears start to rebel. Some day I'll research a better solution, but for now, it works well enough.


Custom molded ear plugs help. A dab of neosporin on each before inserting to lube and "protect" your ear canals. Worked for me during the 2003 Iron Butt Rally.
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« Reply #26 on: August 08, 2021, 01:25:01 pm »


Custom molded ear plugs help. A dab of neosporin on each before inserting to lube and "protect" your ear canals. Worked for me during the 2003 Iron Butt Rally.


Yeah, I had a pair before but they were really cheap and not comfortable. I was going to hit the local IMS show this year to look into them again, but Covid had other ideas....
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« Reply #27 on: August 08, 2021, 06:55:21 pm »


Music? I listen all the time. BUT (big butt here) I use custom-molded ear monitors that double as hearing protection. By putting the audio straight into my ears, I can turn the volume down to just a tick above OFF and it's still easier to hear (and better quality) that helmet speakers blasting full volume to get past ear plugs... AND it's better for your hearing health. The trick is to have it turned way down as background so you can still hear what it going on around you.


I would recommend these….

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00RW1R81E/?coliid=I11SJCKDMIW6KZ&colid=KCAS71OU0ZLX&psc=1&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it

Two types of tips…works as well as foam earplugs.  Insert it deep enough and you have no issue with the wire clearing your helmet.
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« Reply #28 on: August 08, 2021, 06:57:26 pm »


My issue is that after the 4-5th day of stuffing ear plugs into my ears, my ears start to rebel. Some day I'll research a better solution, but for now, it works well enough.


Aside from the Neosporin bit, it’s imperative to clean earbuds daily (soap and water will do) and clean your ears after a hot shower.  Never had an issue with daily wear by doing this.
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« Reply #29 on: August 09, 2021, 07:19:56 am »

Yeah, I had a pair before but they were really cheap and not comfortable. I was going to hit the local IMS show this year to look into them again, but Covid had other ideas....


I have 3 pair. Long cord first. Shorter cord (3') next. Now Blue Tooth and, wired between the 2 only is more convenient but also needs recharging.

I DO NOT care for the looser fitting ones with different tips. Why spend that $$$ when you can put it toward a real fix? Stick with cheap disposable foam if that's your preference IMO.
\
Neosporin was more of a lube, bacteria issue when riding about 15-20 hours a day for 11 days.
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« Reply #30 on: August 10, 2021, 03:38:53 pm »


Hi Mark!

Well, having personally put a few miles on my motorcycles, I'll take a stab at giving you some of my wisdom  Lol

First of all, my mode of traveling has changed considerably over the years. When I was young and single and had limited time, I would try to cram in as many miles a day as possible. Ten hour days were the norm, although pure highway days were usually shorter. Stopping was only useful for fuel and food, and I rarely made stops to "explore". Now a days I (usually) travel with my husband, who does not like long days and we have more time. So we usually make for short(er) riding days and then spend time in whatever place we've landed in for the night.

So how do I plan a trip? This pretty much sums it up:
1. Decide which direction I want to go in, with possible sights to see along the way
2. Based on the time we have, determine how many miles/hours day we have to do things comfortably
3. Spend time on GoogleMaps to look at potential routes
4. Spend time on the internet in general to look up interesting things along the route I might not have known about

During the trip itself we usually have our first night planned out. Once we reach it we look at how the day went, how the forecast looks and if we discovered anything that needs to be seen. If the next day's plan is to keep riding then that night we find an AirBnB or something at our proposed destination.

Repeat until it is time to come home  Cool


As for the GPS, I only use it to map out that day's ride, inputting way points in the morning for what we want to see that day (Garmin Zumo, fwiw).

As for gear, I used to have a Roadcrafter one-piece and while it did get warm, I can't say that I ever regretted having it as my only gear. Now I have mesh gear and waterproofs and will pack according to the likelihood of the conditions I'll encounter.


Might I add to your impressive list to note where the motorcycle repair shops are along your way.

And if you're making accommodations while en route this is a trusted site for good deals on family run motels.

http://www.momandpopmotels.com/
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« Reply #31 on: August 10, 2021, 03:45:00 pm »




Custom molded ear plugs help. A dab of neosporin on each before inserting to lube and "protect" your ear canals. Worked for me during the 2003 Iron Butt Rally.


I've been using a custom set with built in transducers for listening to music. These have replaced my trusty Bose  QuietComfort 20's. But they are pricey.

https://www.bigearinc.com/motorcycle-shop-page/
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« Reply #32 on: August 10, 2021, 04:08:14 pm »

I have tried most types of ear plugs, silicone/foam/wax/noise cancelling/music... Most were OK for 5 or 6 hours but then started to hurt my ear canal. At the 4 hour mark I started changing to a different type and that worked pretty well until the 5th or 6th day.

I finally found 3M EARS, foam on a little plastic stick. I can ride 12 hours day after day with no problem with these. I do clip off the ends of the plastic stick handle so it won't contact my helmet. Then I have a Sena Bluetooth in my helmet for music, phone and GPS.

Everyone's ears are different, just like butts and seats. You have to find what works for you.

As far as maps go, I can't read them without reading glasses and my far vision is fine, so I don't wear glasses in my helmet (Shoei GT Air with drop down tinted visor  Inlove ). Having a paper/plastic map in a tank bag clear sleeve is about worthless for me anymore. With my GPS mounted far away as I can get it, I can read it well enough and couple that with a list of roads/towns I want to follow written out on paper with a sharpie. Again, it's what works for me.
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« Reply #33 on: August 11, 2021, 02:47:00 am »


Everyone's ears are different, just like butts and seats. You have to find what works for you.


Exactly. I have tiny ear canals, so the pressure from some foam ones is just too much.


Anyway, this is (somewhat) derailing the original question  Bigsmile
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« Reply #34 on: August 11, 2021, 05:39:58 am »


Might I add to your impressive list to note where the motorcycle repair shops are along your way.


Hmmm….  I’d see that as tempting fate unless you’re looking for some place to get new tires during the trip.  Murphy always shows up at the worst time and places.
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« Reply #35 on: August 20, 2021, 10:35:51 pm »

I'm surprised nobody has suggested using Butler maps for route planning.  They are a great help in finding the squiggliest roads and separating the paved from the unpaved roads.  With a Butler map of the area, a good route planning program like MyRoute, and a Garmin GPS, you are set.
And there’s always REVER, which has an app in addition to the desktop site. Requires a subscription for the Butler Maps integration, but they have sales for like $25 for a year. I like to plan basic routes in REVER then export the GPX and bring it into BaseCamp for final tuning.
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« Reply #36 on: August 21, 2021, 08:14:28 am »

Nah, paper maps.            Thumbsup
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