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Topic: Things I learned while STRANDED  (Read 72282 times)

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goldylocks303
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« Reply #40 on: August 06, 2008, 11:41:32 am »

Turkey Baster!  Of course.  That's perfect.  

A word about can's of fix a flat.  I used to keep one under my seat because I thought they were the greatest thing since sliced bread.  Well it was rubbing up against a metal piece under my seat and finally wore a hole in the side of the can.  I think it was a slow leak because it didn't just explode gooey junk all at once.  But one day I popped the seat open and there was dried up goo all over the undertail, dripping down on the rear tire hugger and swing arm.    Twofinger  Bottom line: be careful where you put it and check the can regularly, if it looks worn, throw it out.  

eD

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« Reply #41 on: August 07, 2008, 02:36:04 am »


Turkey Baster!  Of course.  That's perfect.  

A word about can's of fix a flat.  I used to keep one under my seat because I thought they were the greatest thing since sliced bread.  Well it was rubbing up against a metal piece under my seat and finally wore a hole in the side of the can.  I think it was a slow leak because it didn't just explode gooey junk all at once.  But one day I popped the seat open and there was dried up goo all over the undertail, dripping down on the rear tire hugger and swing arm.    Twofinger  Bottom line: be careful where you put it and check the can regularly, if it looks worn, throw it out.  

eD





I talked to a couple of folks, not on the forum, I always though that fix a flat would be so much easier and quicker than the plug and pump method. I have never had to use it but people have told me that plugs and pumps are better because Fix a flat is for tubed tires, and does not work on tubeless tires. Does anyone know about this? No one I spoke to was that much of an expert on this, but I am curious if I am doing no good at all carrying it with me since it supposedly doesnt work. Do you know if it will just work temporarily. If I do get a flat tire because of a puncture, even a small one, I am going to have the tire replace asap. within 150 miles, or as soon as I find the closest dealership that has a tire that fits. I dont plan on riding long on a bad tire. I know its expensive but for me it isnt worth the risk.

Thanks,

Mark
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« Reply #42 on: September 01, 2008, 10:36:33 pm »

Fix a flat works great in 4 wheeler tires.  I prefer plugs for motorcycles cause  I don't want a mess when I change the tire.  The foam probably affects the handling of the tire and heating as well.  Plugs actually fit under the seat, fixaflat doesn't but if that's all I had I'd use it.
But it doesn't look I'll need any of those silly must haves in case you break down far from home cause I'll never get to ride far from it!   Mad2
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« Reply #43 on: September 02, 2008, 12:41:43 am »

My only experience with fix a flat was on a car.  It cracked up the tire from the inside to a point where it started leaking like it was 12 years old although it was maybe a month after that.  When the shop took it off, it was all cracked inside.  I would only use fix a flat on a old tire that i will replace soon.
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« Reply #44 on: September 11, 2008, 03:25:13 pm »

Hello all another nube here thought of one for ya.

If your popping for a new cell phone one with a camera and memo/notes section can be a life saver. You can save notes of important things such as VIN, model, part #s etc. Also using the camerat to take pictures of broken items or a picture of a parts lay out can be valuable information on tap.
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« Reply #45 on: September 16, 2008, 04:06:31 pm »




Today, I bought my first "cellphone". I will report back on how it goes. Possibly.


Firstly, these things are called mobiles.

Second. There is no second.

Third. Ibid.
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« Reply #46 on: September 24, 2008, 12:48:02 am »

my number one problem is running out of gas. i like to always stretch to see how far i can go.  aerostich has a folding, laminated cardboard single use 'gas can'.  its basically like a bigger juice box that is prefolded and easy to pack.  im cheap, so after pushing my bike a mile to the next exit on i-95 in bfe florida at 3 am (didnt want to leave it and have to walk back), i learned to take at least one, usually two, small plastic water bottles full of gas with me on long trips.  just make sure they are completely dry (duh) and leave some room at the top so you can slightly squeeze the bottle before putting the top on to allow for expansion. ive never had any issues/problems with them leaking or bursting, however i check on them whenever i stop just to keep my mind at ease.

that previous comment on just taking your tank with you is genious.  why didnt i think of that??? Headscratch Thumbsup  my tank is 7.5 gallons (ie, large), but that beats cupping your hands to hold some gas and then having a nose itch... EEK!


I sure hope you use the reserve too Smile

Also i'd be careful with water bottles.  Gas expands a LOT when it gets warm Smile  Few months ago i bought a 2 gallon gasoline container (you know the pretty red ones) and i filled it with gas maybe 3/4ths full so lots of room for expansion.  I put it in my jeep and about 2 days later i glanced at it and noticed it deformed.  It used to be a square but was now round like a balloon.  No joke.
« Last Edit: September 24, 2008, 12:52:19 am by Triple88a » Logged
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« Reply #47 on: September 26, 2008, 10:32:44 am »

Nubbie to this board, found it by searching for my next bike and ran across this thread and have a few things to add that I believe are helpful.

Phone numbers of friends/family/important contacts written down on paper - just incase your cell/mobile dies/breaks...
Write you blood type and any medical information (even if it is no allergies) inside of your jacket and wallet under your driver's license, just incase...
Business cards - I used one to clean up the contacts on my fuel pump when it flaked out on the side of the road, but some emery cloth would be better.
Extra fuel pump (replace the working one and use the old--known good--one as a spare) if you are on a long trip
Brake fluid
Cash stash

For the guy that runs out of gas often, hopefully your fuel system is gravity fed as running out of fuel as well as running to reserve tax the fuel pump.  Plan your fuel stops.

So now starts the journey to find an FJR or FJ1200 in life as my wrists are not as forgiving now as they were 20 years ago when I got my FZR.  To chain or not to chain, will it be the question of life...
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« Reply #48 on: September 26, 2008, 11:20:46 am »

Wow - this thread is a year old. I had to go through it to make sure I hadn't already posted this.

One thing I learned: after numerous sportbike riders passed me by with nary a glance, it was a couple on a Harley Ultraglide that stopped to see if I was okay and if there was anything they could do to help. No earings, no prison tats, no bolts jammed through their cheeks, no skulls painted on the tank - just a nice couple. So I learned you do (sometimes) meet the nicest people on a Harley. Where have I heard that phrase before? Headscratch
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« Reply #49 on: September 26, 2008, 11:25:00 am »


 So I learned you do (sometimes) meet the nicest people on a Harley. Where have I heard that phrase before? Headscratch


As much as I love to hate them, I have to admit that you are correct. As I pushed my CBR along I-90 (out of gas) it was finally a HD rider that stopped, rode to town and brought back a 1/2 gal. of gas and waited to make sure it would start. Naturally he would not accept any money, but rather suggested that I "pay it forward" which I will be happy to do.
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« Reply #50 on: October 07, 2008, 02:30:19 pm »

I always carry a small siphon hose with me on my trips. Has come in very handy for draining bad gas. Any hardware store sells 1/4 inch ID clear plastic hose, a couple of feet of small hose doesn't take up much room.
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« Reply #51 on: October 07, 2008, 10:56:14 pm »


I always carry a small siphon hose with me on my trips. Has come in very handy for draining bad gas. Any hardware store sells 1/4 inch ID clear plastic hose, a couple of feet of small hose doesn't take up much room.


one from a fish tank Smile
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« Reply #52 on: October 14, 2008, 12:14:29 pm »

I figure a lot of things you want would be the same things you would stow in your car or truck, although sometimes smaller, of course.   Wink

That being said, here are a few things I noticed not mentioned that I thought might be worth doing so...


First Aid Kit
mini Fire Extinguisher
small Thermal Blanket
Highway Flares
Waterproof Matches




To be certain to keep things dry, all your stuff should be placed in "zip-loc" style bags of varying sizes...be sure to get the "freezer" type bags if possible, as they are made of a thicker (i.e., more durable) material.




Ride Safe!



Cheers

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« Reply #53 on: October 21, 2008, 07:54:35 pm »

This is a great thread and most things have been covered but if I could add a few "be prepared" items they would be as follows:

If your bike doesn't have one, install a 12V accessory plug that you can charge your cell phone from (and don't forget your mobile charger). The only thing worse than not having cell coverage is having it and have you phone go dead while you are waiting or trying to arrange for a rescue.

Make a set a mini-jumper cables. You can get the smaller alligator clips with the black and red handles at Radio Shack. Cut a couple of 6' lengths of 12 gauge wire and put them together yourself. They curl up pretty compact.

Hide a spare key somewhere on your bike. Not so much for break-downs but lose a key on a trip and you'll suddently find out how inconvenient it can be.

I'm a big fan of roadside assistance programs and MoTow through AMA has saved my butt on one occasion when I had a flat (un-repairable, un-pluggable slice) on the Valk. It's cheap insurance and peace of mind. BTW...it's almost impossible to push an 800 lb. Valk with a flat rear tire.
« Last Edit: October 21, 2008, 10:00:40 pm by SilverHound » Logged
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« Reply #54 on: October 21, 2008, 08:46:49 pm »

I've used "FixAFlat" on my '04 FJR.  It works, but tends to fling goo all over the underside of the bike while it sets.  The cans are noisy to store in a case, and the large (car size) can is the only one large enough to fill at 190/17 tire.

Your mechanic / tire guy will hate you when it's time to dismount/mount rubber.

There is the danger of explosion if the can gets over 180F (easy inside a case in AZ in August).

My '06 FJR has a Slime pump and a tubeless repair kit.  It takes up less room than a can of FAF, but it will probably require more time to repair than FAF.

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« Reply #55 on: November 03, 2008, 06:32:42 am »

I learned while stranded;

You're never alone 99% of the time if you are on pavement.
There will be another human somewhere that will be willing to help.
Trust that people are basically good and your trust will be rewarded.

Carry a small laptop; the internet is a great resource if you have the means to access it.
Carry a DVD/ CD version of your service manual.
I wear a small laminated card around my neck. On it is typed:

My name and address.
Three contact persons and numbers.
Allergies, surgeries, meds, medical conditions.
DNR.
No long tern life support.
No long tern feeding tube.
Organ donor.

In 9 years I only used it once, but it that was the one time I needed it the most.
Bike and cell phone totalled. Tank bag destroyed and scattered across a night time interstate.
All I remember was holding that card up at anyone standing over me and saying over, and over, "Call Steve, call Steve."


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« Reply #56 on: November 03, 2008, 06:39:37 am »

Cell pone and a pocket full of cash.
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« Reply #57 on: February 28, 2009, 02:05:49 pm »


Cell pone and a pocket full of cash.

The Ducati/Porsche toolbox!  Lol
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« Reply #58 on: April 02, 2009, 08:49:44 pm »

Things I learned while I was stranded?  
I learned that you can't trust BP gas to be water free.  Thumbsdown

I also learned that in the time it takes my wife to drive 150 miles to get me with the trailer, even when it's partly sunny, my head can get so sunburnt that you can see my head half a mile away...  bald guys, bring a hat...


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« Reply #59 on: April 03, 2009, 09:09:16 am »

...bald guys, bring a hat...

Or a roll of tin foil. http://s23.photobucket.com/albums/b399/Marcster2005/Smileypad/LOL/gigglesmile2.gif
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