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Topic: Riding Two Up - a Compendium.  (Read 88695 times)

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truebeliever71
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« Reply #40 on: June 19, 2007, 03:13:51 pm »

Excellent post.  I'm just getting back into riding again after a 12yr hiatus. I am now married and have 3 kids who all want to ride with me.  I have taken my oldest son (just turned 9) on a very small ride to school on his birthday and now he's hooked.  I have never had pillions before and would like to know what recommendations you have for carrying youngsters?

Thanks,
Anthony
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« Reply #41 on: July 12, 2007, 04:56:50 pm »


Excellent post BMW-K, one of the best I have read on a MC forum in quite a while...covering a "very" important topic and skill set. Nice job! Thumbsup


+1

There's also the gear referenced earlier in this thread:  Too many men and women in shorts and tee shirts riding 2-up.  Crazy  I'm forwarding to some friends!
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« Reply #42 on: July 17, 2007, 02:19:39 pm »

Great postings. My wife and I have ridden several thousand miles together over the years.
I have always told my rider to always match me shoulder to shoulder, helmet to helmet in the curves.
One of the biggest improvement to 2-up riding I have ever had was the wonderful addition of a backrest for the pillon rider. As pilots we tend to forget that we absorb all of the acceleration force in our forward leaning angle with our arms. Meanwhile our pillon rider is forced to absorb that same force in their lower back. When I added the Corbin backrest mount, my wife praised me endlessly (well it did end...but for a short while).

The backrest takes the stress off of their lowerback and allows them better stability in acceleration. So in the two "emergency" accelerations I had to produce, she right with me-- instantly able compensate her ergonomics because her center of gravity was held against the backrest. Otherwise her weight will shift backwards very quickly.

Handsignals wonderful-- everyone should generate. We have the "bathroom break" with a quick pat on the package....You know the meaning quickly...and its a WONDERFUL SIGNAL.
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« Reply #43 on: October 04, 2007, 12:41:57 pm »


good stuff. now if i can just find someone to ride on the back...


i just revisited this thread. about a week after i made this post in february, i met someone. she's been on the back ever since. Inlove
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« Reply #44 on: October 18, 2007, 01:07:45 pm »




i just revisited this thread. about a week after i made this post in february, i met someone. she's been on the back ever since. Inlove


Grats to ya!  Two-Up is fun!
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« Reply #45 on: November 22, 2007, 10:16:55 pm »

NEw to this forum and found your article really informative. My dad taught me about riding two up at a young age, so I taught my wife, daughter and have been teaching my 9year old neice alot about riding two up. riding is fun two up  Smile. The bandit i ride has more than enough room for two, plenty of power to go and more important to stop. Lots of miles to y'all..............m..
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« Reply #46 on: November 24, 2007, 12:49:57 pm »


Excellent post.  I'm just getting back into riding again after a 12yr hiatus. I am now married and have 3 kids who all want to ride with me.  I have taken my oldest son (just turned 9) on a very small ride to school on his birthday and now he's hooked.  I have never had pillions before and would like to know what recommendations you have for carrying youngsters?

Thanks,
Anthony


IMHO, riding on the back needs to be "earned" and put off until they're big enough and mature enough to follow instructions and understand how important the rules are. (I've heard some scary stories about pre-teen pillion antics.)

Children also must be big enough to put both feet securely on the footpegs. I prefer that my kids hang onto the luggage rails, which they can wrap hands around rather than trying to hang onto me. Keeps then from sliding into me if I have to brake suddenly.

Kids tend to be wiggly, so a reminder to only do their wiggling when we're moving down the road, in a straight line is important. With the addition NOT to wiggle as we're coming to a stop or moving very slowly.

P
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« Reply #47 on: November 30, 2007, 06:21:09 am »

Don't forget the simple stuff like, "Don't try to put your feet down - EVER - unless I signal you it is o.k. to get off the bike."  It seems natural to people who have never been on a motorcycle to put their feet down, but can make things very interesting at intersections. Smile

If you have a regular riding partner, practice quick stops.  You will be VERY SURPRISED by what can happen, depending on your bike, when you have to stop quickly.

On a sportbike, the pillion can literally slide up your back, causing them to press on your shoulders and significantly affect steering.

The worst passengers are fellow riders.  I won't carry a fellow rider unless I absolutely have to.  
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« Reply #48 on: March 01, 2008, 07:08:29 pm »




Riding pillion is scary!!  EEK! Took my bike for a service the other week and my mate came with me on his bike to take me to and from the shop. We ride a lot together so I know how he rides, when he brakes and leans etc so I could react as one with him and that was all fine. But goddamn I do not like not being in control!!  Crazy


Oh, man!  I had a similar experience last summer...my buddy took me to where my bike was on the back of his CBR-600 F3.  A CBR-600 F3 with a Corbin seat that the previous owner had Armor-Alled and stored outside uncovered.  Needless to say, it was terrifying trying to keep from skating off of that thing in every driection, even for only 3 miles.
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« Reply #49 on: March 01, 2008, 07:11:30 pm »


Excellent post.  I'm just getting back into riding again after a 12yr hiatus. I am now married and have 3 kids who all want to ride with me.  I have taken my oldest son (just turned 9) on a very small ride to school on his birthday and now he's hooked.  I have never had pillions before and would like to know what recommendations you have for carrying youngsters?

Thanks,
Anthony


Well, I rode on the back with my dad a bit when I was in the 6 ~ 12 year old range, and I must say that a motocross helmet is to be avoided on the street.  When I was little it WORKED, but I was also in the wind shadow of my dad.  If I poked my head around either side of him it felt like the wind would take my helmet off and my head with it.
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« Reply #50 on: March 14, 2008, 03:44:44 pm »

I have a 97 VFR 750 and when I go out with the girlfriend I have all my GIVI bag set up on.  She is a bit short so its easier for her to get on first as I hold the bike then I get on, the same in reverse for getting off.  Seems to work good for us as the larger bags make getting on after me almost impossible for her .....
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« Reply #51 on: March 14, 2008, 05:54:50 pm »

I have a question regarding the MSF passenger tip sheet--Under General Safety Considerations, item #12 says to start the motorcycle before the passenger mounts.  Why is this?

A friend and I discussed it and all we came up with was that it's a leftover from the kickstart days.  But that seems strange to say that you should start ANY motorcycle before a passenger gets on.  Can anyone shed some light on this?
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« Reply #52 on: March 15, 2008, 10:41:10 am »


I have a question regarding the MSF passenger tip sheet--Under General Safety Considerations, item #12 says to start the motorcycle before the passenger mounts.  Why is this?

A friend and I discussed it and all we came up with was that it's a leftover from the kickstart days.  But that seems strange to say that you should start ANY motorcycle before a passenger gets on.  Can anyone shed some light on this?


Hi Rick,

I don't know if there's really any pro-con here at all.  I think this will just boil down to personal preference.

The only reason I can see about having the bike started before allowing the passenger to get on involves being able to use the throttle to control the bike in certain circumstances.  ie: if your brakes decide to go out you could use the throttle to hold your position.  Or, if you were falling over you could accelerate out of falling (likely dumping your pillion, but what they hey!)

I can also see it as being just another bit of time for a bike to warm up.

Me personally, I always let my pillion mount the bike with the bike off.  No particular reason - it just "feels" right to me.

BTW, the MSF provides a very basic foundation for riding.  And I do mean basic.  As your skills grow and bike technology grows a lot of the "old rules" just don't apply.  I mean, look at the current BMW K1200LT with it's hydraulic c-stand.  Talk about making it easy!
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« Reply #53 on: July 04, 2008, 07:01:30 pm »

Well I'm sort of a newbee as I took a Loooooooooooong break between rides. My new BMW 1150 R has been my choice of poison this time around and is a good bike for one or two up though in raw form is not exactly ideal for cruising two up.


That said after about five thousand miles I'm taking a chubby little red head along for the mountain runs to share the beauty and have a buddy to take breaks with and smell the roses so to speak. She had a LOT of miles in the seat with a previous BF but they were on the back of a Gullwing , not a R type Beemer so she gave my nads a frequent introduction to the gas tank for the down hill passes but was a great rider on the uphill charges. We got a good rythum considering the amount of time together we had and I look forward to taking her along on occasion.

I agree with most of the posts above and frankly at my age 65 I recognize that two up riding is probably best on bikes designed for that so I don't plan to make a touring cruiser out of my R model but do plan on making a few simple changes for the passengers comfort . I think a top box with a seat back would be great for us I already have two hard bags and a tank bag for luggage and enough gear for weather.

If I were going to do a LOT of two up , I'd get the RT and change little about that as I don't see myself on a Hog or a Honda anytime soon.

The main thing I've noticed is ,even with a good seasoned passenger on back you need to rethink your timing for passing, and stopping and downhill mountain passes. Especially if the gal is a tad on the chunky side. Not that there's anything wrong with that.

I posted when I first got my bike and said I was getting back into it and have put five grand on the clock since then mostly solo doing as much practice as possible in good technique and remastering the idea of truly defensive driving. I've been almost run over twice so far by typical folks who were not aware of me even in my dayglo jacket and menacing looking black beemer. So I know that it will be no way for me to ever take the concentration away for a second while riding in traffic of anykind and I've learned quicky that riding two up or one up the main thing for us new guys is don't get cocky. And if you ride a beemer , remember to cancel your turn signal. That will get you killed real quick.

I'm also amazed at the comraderie of other drivers regardless of what bike they are on and that is very comforting.  Thumbsup
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« Reply #54 on: July 27, 2008, 02:11:06 pm »

Excellent work, I have never ridden with a passenger, and now my girlfriend and I decided that we will give it a go. We are going to go for a ride around the block when I get home from work, we live in the country so that means about 5 miles. See how she feels, and more importantly, see how I feel. She is a big girl and I ride a VFR so she should be comfortable. When I say big I dont mean big around, she is 5'10 with long legs. Also I have explained to her that I am scared to death and I dont want her to get hurt so I told her to get her own bike lol, but thats not going to happen, we may love it and take some longer rides!!!

I made her read your post and she learned quite a bit, I know I certainly did!!!

Thank you again!!!

Mark
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« Reply #55 on: July 27, 2008, 02:17:39 pm »

Good luck, and have fun riding two-up!  I don't get to very often, but it's a wonderful experience.  If I can offer any advice, it's to make sure she understands that she has nearly as much control over the bike's direction as you do.  For instance, don't be surprised when she turns her head to look at the passing scenery, that the bike will turn in the direction she's looking.  I guess what I'm saying is, it takes a lot more effort at the controls just to go straight.  Best thing you can do is keep speeds low and build them up as your confidence (and hers) builds.  Have fun and be safe!

-Rick



Excellent work, I have never ridden with a passenger, and now my girlfriend and I decided that we will give it a go. We are going to go for a ride around the block when I get home from work, we live in the country so that means about 5 miles. See how she feels, and more importantly, see how I feel. She is a big girl and I ride a VFR so she should be comfortable. When I say big I dont mean big around, she is 5'10 with long legs. Also I have explained to her that I am scared to death and I dont want her to get hurt so I told her to get her own bike lol, but thats not going to happen, we may love it and take some longer rides!!!

I made her read your post and she learned quite a bit, I know I certainly did!!!

Thank you again!!!

Mark
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« Reply #56 on: August 07, 2008, 11:27:11 pm »

Since few have shared their stories, i thought i might share mine from few months ago, A buddy of mine had a GSXR600, the way the tank was shaped, it made very good handles.  He thought he would give me a ride around the block so i can feel how the 600 rides.  I was "frozen" on the seat.  No movement, just hold on to the tank and dont move. I was pretty comfortable since i was holding on to the bike instead of a person that moves and he said i didnt throw his balance off one bit.  I gues handles on a bike are not a bad idea but then if something happens to the passenger you will see this with out the driver knowing.

http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r46/Motorbiker_photos/NewsPics/oldNewsPics2/The-Bitch-If-you-can-read-this.jpg
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« Reply #57 on: October 07, 2008, 01:32:35 pm »

The passenger must squeeze the rider with her legs!  Just as the rider should squeeze the tank with his.

That is something I learned recently and after carrying passengers for years without feeling safe or comfortable, completely changed the joy of the ride.  My gf and I did almost 300 miles on one of her first rides through twisty mountain roads.  I could barely tell she was there.  Try it!
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« Reply #58 on: January 03, 2009, 10:56:09 pm »

Lots of good informaiton on here...If someone hasn't riden two-up before, this WILL definately help. It's funny that they mention the Pillion has their ambassador duties. She does just that, waves to the people and she loves giving the sign to the passing riders  Smile.
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« Reply #59 on: April 07, 2009, 05:51:54 pm »

Although I've ridden many miles 2-up with good, bad and (no ugly) Pillion's,
I prefer not to for the simple reason that it's one more huge set of variables on an already unstable condition.
I can feel it in the bike when my pillion simply moves a hand up to her face to scratch her nose.
I do it, but don't really like riding 2-up, plus I think it's the mental thing that I'm
totally responsible here for another life besides my own.

my GF has her own bike, but trying to talk her into getting a bigger more ST friendly one
so we can tour and camp and enjoy the road + experience together.
Two bikes beef up the comfort level of a campsite shared by two, also.
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