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Topic: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...  (Read 94153 times)

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William
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« Reply #100 on: February 18, 2010, 06:54:26 pm »

I stole this idea from a friend. And it works great for me since I've several rosemary plants at the house...

The smell gasoline smell seems impossible to completely remove off my hands. After a good washing, I just pull a sprig of Rosemary off the bush in the yard and roll it around my hands. Lemon peels work well too.

Thanks Tony!!!
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« Reply #101 on: February 18, 2010, 10:38:00 pm »

Yep Orange or lemon peals work wonders at soaking up the smell of Gas or solvent Thumbsup
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« Reply #102 on: February 19, 2010, 06:39:09 am »

*nods* That's why citrus cleaners and orange Gojo are so popular.  Thumbsup

A few small, obvious things:

* I use a separate funnel for clean and waste oil.

* I use old Hawaiian Punch bottles for waste oil, antifreeze, etc, when I don't have spare oil bottles.

* The oil recycler is on the way to work. Convenience overcomes laziness and forgetfulness.

* Write down each tool you use the first time you work on a new-to-you bike, or the first time you need a specific tool. You can use this list to build a tool pack of quality tools specific to your bike. The OEM tools are typically worthless beyond the shock adjuster (if equipped) and the spark plug socket.

* If it's cold out, leave the tires inside the house over night the day before you're changing them. Goes easier.

* ONLY use hand tools (vs. electric or air powered tools) on disassembly of critical systems like wheels, forks, etc., so that you can tell if things have de-torqued over time. If they have, replace the fasteners immediately. Torque to spec on reassembly (duh!) Over-torqued fasteners is a leading cause of stripped threads, ruined fasteners and things that mysteriously loosen up for no apparent reason.

* For you Harley owners, buy T27 bits by the bushel. They are easy to lose. DAMHIK.

* Double up on common-sized wrenches. You'll need them. Unlike many SAE bolt-nut combinations ( 1/2" bolt head with 9/16" nut size), most metric fasteners are the same size for nut and bolt head.

* If you've got a wheel that's just chronically difficult to balance when you put tires on, go ahead and static balance it sans tire. You'll likely find the wheel itself is WAY out. The rear wheel on my FJR was like this, and pretty bad.

And quite possibly the most important two tips:

* Don't be lazy at the end of the job. The job's not done 'til the cleanup is done.

* Take care of your tools and your tools will take care of you. Wipe them down and inspect them before putting them away. And don't forget ratchet maintenance.
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« Reply #103 on: February 19, 2010, 07:24:36 am »

Use your bikes tool kit when you work on your bike.
It won't take long and your kit will evolve to something you can actually use.
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William
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« Reply #104 on: February 22, 2010, 11:11:47 pm »



And quite possibly the most important two tips:

* Don't be lazy at the end of the job. The job's not done 'til the cleanup is done.

* Take care of your tools and your tools will take care of you. Wipe them down and inspect them before putting them away. And don't forget ratchet maintenance.


Great post, Chris. My father blessed me with these two bits of wisdom, and this one:

* Do no harm.
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« Reply #105 on: February 22, 2010, 11:58:51 pm »

I was rebuilding the forks on a 88 EX500. when i went to grab the fork seal driver and found out it was to big. the forks were 35mm and the smallest driver i had was 42mm. what to do? Headscratch  

I grabbed one of the seals and headed to home depot. went to the plumbing dept and found a galvanised pipe  the same diameter as the seal. make shire you get it long enough so you can hold it when driving the seal. . when i got home i took one end to the grinder and and grinded down the threads b/c it wouldn't hit the outer tube.

It only cost me $4.00 and i didn't have to spend $$$ for a seal driver for only a one time use.

http://i120.photobucket.com/albums/o187/mxvet57/POSTING%20PICKS/100_7468.jpg

http://i120.photobucket.com/albums/o187/mxvet57/POSTING%20PICKS/100_7470.jpg
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« Reply #106 on: February 25, 2010, 10:35:00 am »

*nods* I used PVC pipe for the same purpose.  Thumbsup
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« Reply #107 on: February 25, 2010, 09:37:55 pm »


*nods* I used PVC pipe for the same purpose.  Thumbsup


nice thing about the pipe is more driving mass. and did i ever need it. the seal was not cooperating.
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« Reply #108 on: February 26, 2010, 11:27:19 am »

Stole this from another thread on another website. I like the idea and will have to give it a try...

Quote
PVC pipe makes an excellent gasket scraper. If you have a miter saw with a sharp blade, just cut the end square, and the edge of the pipe will be surprisingly sharp, but it won't hurt the metal surface. It still takes some patience to get everything removed because you can only scrape very small areas at a time, but I found it much less frustrating than a plastic putty knife, and much less scary than using a metal scraper. Some other nice things about using PVC pipe: they tend to hold static electricity so scraps of gasket tend to stick to them instead of falling into nooks and crannies; when one part of the edge gets gummed up with gasket just turn it a little for a clean piece of scraping surface; when the whole thing gets dull just trim a millimeter or so off the end with the saw. I cut mine about 8" or 9" long, and use pipe with about 1.5" outside diameter though I may get some smaller for use in tighter areas.
Quote
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« Reply #109 on: March 04, 2010, 12:23:53 pm »

I always use a new razor blade to scrape case gaskets.  Then finish with a stone.  

Just remember, a good seal doesn't mean a perfect surface.  You want the gasket to have a surface it can sink into, on a microfinish level.  You do not want a mirror/perfect surface since the two cases are also never perfectly parallel.
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« Reply #110 on: March 11, 2010, 02:35:20 pm »

Scratched or hazed plastic headlight lens, etc.? Use regular white Colgate toothpaste to buff out the plastic lens. It's cheaper than buying dedicated plastic lens polish, leaves your plastic parts minty fresh, and does double duty by helping to maintain your periodontal health.
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« Reply #111 on: March 22, 2010, 02:05:52 pm »

I've found that brake cleaner will revitalize the glue on many items.  For example there are little covers on my seat tray that have double sided tape on them.  One popped off.  Spray a little brake cleaner on a paper towel, not too much, wipe the dirt off the glue, wait for tackiness, reapply.   Done this a couple times and it hasn't let me down yet.  No, I don't have a KLR!
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« Reply #112 on: March 24, 2010, 05:57:44 pm »

I heard this one this morning on http://www.staceydavid.com/.

If you lose a small part and you can get a vacuum to the area of the part but not your hand, you take some panty hose/stockings (not your special ones), let the vacuum suck up some of the hose, hold the rest, then go after the part. The panty hose will act as a net, and will catch the part. Turn off the vacuum and grab the part.
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« Reply #113 on: March 25, 2010, 07:09:20 am »


I heard this one this morning on http://www.staceydavid.com/.

If you lose a small part and you can get a vacuum to the area of the part but not your hand, you take some panty hose/stockings (not your special ones), let the vacuum suck up some of the hose, hold the rest, then go after the part. The panty hose will act as a net, and will catch the part. Turn off the vacuum and grab the part.


This has saved me once or twice over the years.  Thumbsup

Stick a piece of black tape or masking tape across the head of a bolt to snug it into a socket a little tighter if you need to feed it into a difficult-to-get-to hole and it keeps falling out the socket.

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mxvet57
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« Reply #114 on: March 27, 2010, 10:00:38 pm »


I heard this one this morning on http://www.staceydavid.com/.

If you lose a small part and you can get a vacuum to the area of the part but not your hand, you take some panty hose/stockings (not your special ones), let the vacuum suck up some of the hose, hold the rest, then go after the part. The panty hose will act as a net, and will catch the part. Turn off the vacuum and grab the part.


forgot all about that one. thanks for reminding me again
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« Reply #115 on: April 15, 2010, 11:38:16 am »

This is good stuff  Thumbsup
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« Reply #116 on: April 22, 2010, 09:12:35 pm »

I'm sure you all know how to double up combination wrenches for extra leverage...  Thumbsup
This has been invaluble to me over the years.
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« Reply #117 on: May 18, 2010, 07:43:12 am »

Stuck oil filter removal:  When everything else has failed and you don't want a mess or destroy the filter using pliers or a screwdriver, try a metal worm gear hose clamp on the filter and use a nut driver or wrench for leverage.  Worked for me once anyway.
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« Reply #118 on: June 10, 2010, 02:41:52 pm »

To give credit where due:
The key with GoJo is to let it soak in.  It's not soap, it's petrolium based... so it will disolve petrolium products -- but it needs time.
If you just rub it on your hands for 30 seconds then rinse it off, it won't do squat.  Continually rub it into your hands for 3 - 4 minutes, and it will remove just about anything.  If it's not turning into a liquid and dripping off your hands, you're not rubbing it in long enough.

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« Reply #119 on: June 10, 2010, 02:48:41 pm »

* Write down each tool you use the first time you work on a new-to-you bike, or the first time you need a specific tool. You can use this list to build a tool pack of quality tools specific to your bike.  

It also makes maintenance much easier when you can grab all the tools you need in 1 trip to the tool box.
I keep a list of the tools needed for ea maint. job on ea vehicle in the same file I use to record when the maintenance was done.
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