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Topic: Garage & Tools Tips & Tricks...  (Read 85189 times)

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mxvet57
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« Reply #20 on: November 20, 2009, 11:05:39 am »


With the lever released, there is a clear and open path from the bleed fitting on the caliper to the reservoir.

This allows fluid from the reservoir to reach the actual master cylinder.

When you squeeze the lever (or depress the pedal), the passage from the reservoir to the cylinder is closed. This keeps the pressure in the cylider/line/caliper, as opposed to pressurizing the reservoir.

So, no, you don't have to squeeze the lever.

Have I made that sufficiently muddy?


any good mechanic would understand what you just said.
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« Reply #21 on: November 20, 2009, 11:13:54 am »




any good mechanic would understand what you just said.


And yet, I understood it too.   Headscratch

Here's another one I found for winterizing the bike.  Instead of 2x4s and plywood under the tires to keep them off the ground, pick up a large exercise mat from Sports Authority, like what goes under a treadmill or Bowflex.  The tires are still insulated from the concrete, and it's easier on your feet/knees the rest of the year when you're wrenching and standing all day.
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« Reply #22 on: November 20, 2009, 11:18:17 am »

Using a paint stick, mark the oil filter with the milage at which is should be change.

Use the same paint stick to note the tire pressures for the bike under the seat someplace (this becomes more valuable as the vehicle count in the motor pool grows).
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« Reply #23 on: November 20, 2009, 11:45:56 am »


And yet, I understood it too.   Headscratch


 Lol Lol I had the same thought.


Here's another one I found for winterizing the bike.  Instead of 2x4s and plywood under the tires to keep them off the ground, pick up a large exercise mat from Sports Authority, like what goes under a treadmill or Bowflex.  The tires are still insulated from the concrete, and it's easier on your feet/knees the rest of the year when you're wrenching and standing all day.


Hey, I really like that one. It gets done this year.
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« Reply #24 on: November 20, 2009, 01:20:01 pm »

If you're like me, much of your riding gear lives in the garage -- some small creature reminded me of this trick for the lsst three mornings in a row by leaving an acorn in my right boot.

A drier sheet left in an enclosed area will discourage mice, rats, squirrels and the like from going into said space --

Half a sheet in each boot, one in the exit of your muffler, one in the battercompartment (I have no idea what is tasty about wiring looms, but there's seemingly something) . . . . . you get the idea . . . . .

Cheap ones work as well as spendy ones -- a trip to the dollar store may be in order.
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chornbe

« Reply #25 on: November 20, 2009, 01:26:12 pm »


I'd be more apt to pull rather than push - just because I would HATE to overflow the reservoir and deal with the mess/damage.


Agreed. I vacuum bleed, then pressure bleed for completeness... then do pressure bleed again the next day. You never get all the air out the first time.

On a full rebuild on a master cylinder, bench bleed it before hooking up the lines.

On a full caliper rebuild, fill the caliper with break fluid by pouring it in the hose attachment hole with the bleeder open.

The stupid Brembo-built calipers on my Harley have the bleeder and hose connection on the same hole, so I would *HAVE* to prefill the caliper anyway.
« Last Edit: November 20, 2009, 01:28:20 pm by LuvMy883 » Logged
chornbe

« Reply #26 on: November 20, 2009, 01:30:03 pm »

if you have a lift, get proficient at putting bikes up on it frontwards and backwards. Locking the rear wheel into the clamp (or chock of you're using one) and hoisting the front makes pulling the front apart a real snap. None of my bikes have center stands at the moment, so even getting the 800lb Harley up on the lift backwards is something you get good at out of necessity.  Thumbsup
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« Reply #27 on: November 20, 2009, 02:06:59 pm »

Paint sticks are showing up a lot on this thread.  Here's another idea to help with valve adjustment:  If you have to change a shim on a shim-under-bucket system, use a paint stick to mark the cam chain at the cam allignment marks before removing the cams.  This saves a lot of time counting pins and worry about getting the cam timing right.  I've only done this once, so I don't know how easy it would be go get the marks to allign on the next time you have to take the cams out, but you can always paint again the next time.  
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« Reply #28 on: November 20, 2009, 02:13:05 pm »

Any way we can get this thread stickied?
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« Reply #29 on: November 20, 2009, 02:21:18 pm »

pencil erasers clean elctrical contacts very nicely.
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« Reply #30 on: November 20, 2009, 02:24:02 pm »

If you can afford a free-standing wheel chock that holds the bike vertical, or a lift, get one. Doesn't have to be the top of the line (I bought the cheapeast Harbor Freight lift and it's fine).

Cleaning, basic maintenance, body-work swaps (for you track-day guys), engine work, carb/TB syncs, pipe swaps... nearly everything that can be done with the wheels still on the bike is just easier when the bike is properly vertical.

A lift is preferable over a chock because getting the bike up to standing working height really eases fatigue and knee soreness.
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« Reply #31 on: November 20, 2009, 03:24:54 pm »

this may not fit here...and I know there are some who just don't do it, but...

Never wash the bike down with water UNLESS you have time t go for a ride before putting it up for the night (or longer).  The ride will rid the bike of hard to reach areas where water may collect.
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« Reply #32 on: November 20, 2009, 05:16:20 pm »


this may not fit here...and I know there are some who just don't do it, but...

Never wash the bike down with water UNLESS you have time t go for a ride before putting it up for the night (or longer).  The ride will rid the bike of hard to reach areas where water may collect.


Unless you're one of those rich types who dropped $300 on one of those fancy blower dryer thingies...   Rolleyes

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« Reply #33 on: November 20, 2009, 05:51:07 pm »

After I wash it I dry my bike with my leaf blower.
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« Reply #34 on: November 23, 2009, 11:44:32 am »


Agreed. I vacuum bleed, then pressure bleed for completeness... then do pressure bleed again the next day. You never get all the air out the first time.


A useful trick after bleeding / vacuum bleeding is apply pressure to the brake lever (e.g. tightly bungy the brake lever to the handlebar) overnight. The pressure will force those tiny little bubbles to the top.
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« Reply #35 on: November 25, 2009, 05:43:46 pm »

Something else I recently learned while wrenching on my KLR... Lock-Tite everything!! That thumper routinely vibrates parts loose. It's not un-common to hear fasteners falling off the bike while cruising down the road...  Rolleyes
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« Reply #36 on: November 25, 2009, 06:34:52 pm »

Poor Man's Bike Lift
4 eye hooks, good size ones, 7/16" shank, screwed into the rafters of your garage.

In a square pattern, Wider than your handlebars and 6" longer than your wheelbase.

4 ratchet type tie down straps hanging down, hooked with soft straps to your bars and rear frame and you can safely jack the scoot up as high as you like.

Works great for dirt bikes, but I lifted the K12GT up and pulled both wheels without drama.
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« Reply #37 on: November 26, 2009, 04:18:17 pm »

The foam pads (9 x 18 x 1?) they sell for gardening kneepads work good in the garage too.  Good to sit on too.
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« Reply #38 on: November 26, 2009, 04:21:07 pm »

Non-hardening gasket sealer works as a 'shade-tree' lock-tite.  Not for nuts n bolts that actually need lock-tite, but for the ones that just need a little something.
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« Reply #39 on: November 26, 2009, 04:35:15 pm »


Next question is, where do you get a syringe if you are not in the medical field or a junky?  How about a turkey baseter?

They are non-rx in most states, you can just walk up to the pharmacy and ask what they've got.  Farm supply stores will have them in with the animal meds too.

I have bought syringes from the pharmacy and not been given any trouble.  I'm a snob and only use the good brand ones when giving vaccines.  Farm supply store around here only carries off brand stuff and I only want to stick sharp needles into pets.  Don't mind spending an extra 10 cents, I'm already saving $20 on the vaccine.  Razz
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