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Topic: Emergency Contact Info  (Read 120726 times)

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« on: February 27, 2007, 09:18:55 am »

In light of a new season coming on, and some other instances that have happened to me, and others recently, I just wanted to bring this up.

What happens when shit happens and you are not able to talk to answer questions? Who do you want contacted in case of an accident? What type blood do you have? Insurance info?

Where do you keep this info so that it is readily available? In your pockets? In the tail section of your bike? Tank bag?

What happens if the bike burns and all of that info is destroyed?

1st off, use the I.C.E. system in your cell phone. (In Case of Emergency) This is recognized as a fast way to look up contact info for the ones you want called in case of an accident. Failing that, what next?

I recommend using the medical pouches that attach to your helmet. Enter all pertanant info on the sheet and then attach it to your helmet. It will be visable there and readily available to EMT personnel.

This company will send you one a month for free as well.

http://www.cyclegadgets.com/Products/product.asp?Item=MICS

I just ordered 10 of them in addition to the free one and will be handing them out to everyone the next time I head to Deals Gap!
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« Reply #1 on: February 27, 2007, 10:35:42 am »

HOO RAH MSGT!!! Semper Fi!!

It's nice to know that others have considered this.  I personally have a laminated card with all the pertinent information in the chest pocket of all my riding gear, as well as my helmet.  I also keep with it, an additional 20 bucks for that time that cash is an emergency.  BFE gas station, need a tow, need a cab, have a break down and forgot the wallet.  Any of those situations.  

Also, have the Emergency Contact listing in my cell phone and sewn inside my riding boots.

However, thanks for the reminder, some of my information has changed and needs to be updated before the season starts.
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« Reply #2 on: February 27, 2007, 10:43:06 am »

In addition to emergency numbers in the cell phone (I don't use ICE, but I label my speed dial with "wife," "parents," "brother," etc instead of names) I keep vital information in my wallet (always on me), in my tank bag, and in a pocket in my jacket. I've seen the helmet idea before, but never bothered with it. IMO paramedics are used to looking for ID in wallets and clothing, but may not check the helmet over carefully while in a rush to save my ass.
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« Reply #3 on: February 27, 2007, 11:44:39 am »

Here is something all of you should have while riding. I know the owner personally, and he is a honest person, with numerous years of emergency response experience. He is also a fellow rider. I do not ride without one !


Link:  http://www.resqtag.com/
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« Reply #4 on: February 27, 2007, 12:13:04 pm »

You may want to make sure your cell phone is on when you ride.  And make sure the "location" feature is turned on.  It's my understanding that you can be located if the phone is in a reception area even if you are unconscious and unable to call.
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« Reply #5 on: February 27, 2007, 12:16:39 pm »

The Army taught me the answer to this...dog tags.

I never ride without having a dog tag and a spare key to the bike around my neck.  The dog tag contain my name, address, phone number and blood type.   Wink
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« Reply #6 on: February 27, 2007, 12:22:09 pm »

Over at the Motorcycle Tourer's Website you can get tags for free if you have posted 50 times to the forum, or for $5 as a member.
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« Reply #7 on: February 27, 2007, 12:28:10 pm »


The Army taught me the answer to this...dog tags.

I never ride without having a dog tag and a spare key to the bike around my neck.  The dog tag contain my name, address, phone number and blood type.   Wink


I was in a running shop this weekend and saw a dog tag-like ID for runners. Seems like a good idea, since there's no way emergency personnel would miss it during an evaluation.
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« Reply #8 on: February 27, 2007, 03:01:40 pm »

I have spoken to some EMTs about the "ICE" contact in a cell phone.  They have all shrugged and said they'd never heard of such a thing.    I ordered one of those things from Cyclegadgets.com...seems like a good thing.
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« Reply #9 on: February 27, 2007, 03:12:10 pm »

I wear one of those CycleGadget things on the back of my helmet.

With luck, I'll never need it.
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« Reply #10 on: February 27, 2007, 03:39:07 pm »


I have spoken to some EMTs about the "ICE" contact in a cell phone.  They have all shrugged and said they'd never heard of such a thing.


I've got friends who are EMTs and they say that it is against regulations for a rescuer to attempt to access anything on a victim's cell phone. For one, just because the person is carrying the phone, it might not be theirs. For another, suppose the EMT is really inept and manages to delete important (or valuable) information... who is liable?

You're better off going with a dog tag, etc. I've got one of the helmet sticker things.

P

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« Reply #11 on: February 27, 2007, 03:48:30 pm »

EMT's don't contact your family and its generally frowned upon when they rifle your pockets. Since there is no medical benefit to them knowing who you are (except being able to call you by name) this isn't really who you leave the information for.
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« Reply #12 on: February 27, 2007, 04:01:20 pm »

I really like that dog tag and spare key around the neck.   Thumbsup
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« Reply #13 on: March 06, 2007, 07:28:59 am »

I keep my Cell with me , and in my wallet there is an In Case of Emergency contact list with phone numbers , these are all in the Cell.
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« Reply #14 on: March 06, 2007, 07:33:03 am »

I just carry my Batman flash light.
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« Reply #15 on: March 06, 2007, 08:51:56 am »

I keep a sheet of paper with emergency contact information, my blood type, and the lone allergy I have in four places.

In my wallet, up front and clearly labeled such that it will be the first thing noticed if emergency personnel or police open it.
In one of the pockets of my Aerostich
In the top pocket of my tankbag
In the tailsection of the bike.  

Redundancy is good.
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« Reply #16 on: March 06, 2007, 09:40:12 am »

Great post!  Thumbsup

I put ICE in my cell phone when I read about it a few years ago. Also I always tell my wife the general area I am traveling in.

And I also sign up for our emergency helicopter ambulance of sorts. Here, it is called Life Flight. It is $50/yr for my wife and I.
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« Reply #17 on: March 06, 2007, 10:01:01 am »

Like some have stated here, we do not contact people on a cell phone you own. I will look for your i.d if your wallet is on the ground. I will not go through your jacket or your bike luggage, I don't care whats in it, you're evidently unconscious and I need to make sure there's nothing sticking out of you and everything is where it's supposed to be.
           Dog tags=yes catch my eye everytime. Info on helmet=definitely good idea, if you wear it. Medic alert tags=yes, in fact first thing I look for if you're not wakey wakey, not every trauma starts at stupidity, some do have funny causes.
   I really want to know you age,meds,medical history(not list of booboo's)such as hypertension,diabetes, hepatitis a/b/c/d, etc or anything you're taking meds for and what MEDICINES you're allergic to, not" I can't eat shellfish or oranges" we're not taking you to red lobster on the way. And yes psych is a med history, especially if you're taking medicines for it, some medicines don't like other medicines in their playground, so if you take zoloft or xanax tell me!

 The only time I will grab your wallet is if I have to put you on a backboard and it's thick enough that it interferes w/ me keeping your back and hips properly immobilized. Hope this helps, and I hope you never have a need for this to be handy!
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« Reply #18 on: March 06, 2007, 10:23:43 am »

This thread has given me a great idea.

I'm going to make my own ResQTag type 'tag', and make it big enough to wrap around / hold a spare key (and then wear it like a dog tag).
I'm not sure people would find a key-fob / pull (and I sometimes ride w/o a jacket when it's really warm).

Something I've done in the past, was to print out my emergency info (cause my hand writting sucks) and then reduce it on a copier to the size of a credit card.
You can get a WHOLE LOT of info on one wallet-card this way.
I then 'laminated' it with clear tape.

There is NO logic that justifies NOT putting an I.C.E. entry in your cell phone.  The boy scouts and military taught me that preperation effects final results.
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« Reply #19 on: March 06, 2007, 12:17:10 pm »

evilmedic13:
 Great post! I would like to add that we don't rely on information found on the bike/helmet, because you don't know if the patient is owner or not. Dogtags/bracelets aren't as likely to be on loan, so we would give those a little more consideration.
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« Reply #20 on: March 06, 2007, 12:26:23 pm »

All great info, but I'm just wondering, would a hospital give you blood based on your info? Wouldn't they type you first to be sure? I would think allergies to medications would be very important and perhaps the # to your local hospital/doctor. that way medical personel could get your rmedical records and contact info quickly and accurately?  
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« Reply #21 on: December 04, 2008, 03:53:54 am »

Emergency Medical Information

I wear a typed, laminated card around my neck.
It contains the following information.

On one side, my name, address, allergies, surgeries, fractures, and conditions.

On the other side, organ donor, no blood reactions, no long term feed tube or life support and three contact persons.

On a separate typed, laminated card I list my medications.


I’ve only used it once but it was there when I needed it. I don’t remember much but the woman that found me in the ditch in the middle of the night told me later that all I could say over and over again was, “Call Steve” and I was holding up that card.

She called Steve, after calling 911 and they called the chopper.

Later I learned that my cell phone, and most of my other electronics were destroyed, bike totaled, and all my riding gear except my gloves and boots were cut off.

Due to my concussion, I could not have given my medical history.




My reasoning for the card was based on my time as an ER nurse.
The first thing EMS does is cut your clothes off to assess and place EKG leads.
They don’t look on you helmet for stickers. (nor does ER Doc)
They don’t generally look at zippers for pouches. (nor does ER Doc)
They don’t look at your cell phone. (nor does ER Doc)
They don’t look for flash drives. (nor does ER Doc)

It would be on my body dead or alive.
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« Reply #22 on: December 04, 2008, 07:57:28 am »

I carry a laminated card in my wallet and wear one of these around my neck, both with all the pertinent contact and medical information (information is on the side of the dog tag that you can't see in the photo). The RoadID tag -- stainless steel, reasonably priced -- is also available as a bracelet.

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« Reply #23 on: December 04, 2008, 09:20:52 am »


I have spoken to some EMTs about the "ICE" contact in a cell phone.  They have all shrugged and said they'd never heard of such a thing.    I ordered one of those things from Cyclegadgets.com...seems like a good thing.


I'm a cop and as a first responder, I can tell you most people don't know about ICE.  Also... a lot of departments have policies that do not allow their staff to get into your cell phone unless you give them the okay.  If you are unconscious, you won't be able to tell them it's okay.
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« Reply #24 on: December 04, 2008, 09:31:29 am »

I keep this information in my wallet, sandwiched between my driver's license and medical insurance card.
Since my wallets is always on my person. It wouldn't make sense to keep it on my bike/car.

It travels with me, no matter where I am. Hell I could be hit by a car crossing the road as a pedestrian... emergency information on my bike won't help me there, it only works if it travels with you.



« Last Edit: December 04, 2008, 09:33:15 am by Thundergod » Logged

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« Reply #25 on: December 04, 2008, 09:36:05 am »

i am also former leo, and i can say that all i would look for was an id to hand off to the medics upon arrival if you were in sleep mode.  honestly, i would limit the amount of you and your stuff that i touched for liability purposes.
\

moderators: can we make this topic a sticky?...as there have been a few threads on this topic with some great ideas.
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« Reply #26 on: December 04, 2008, 09:55:44 am »

Ohio has a new program through the BMV that keeps emergency contact info for just such purposes. The info can be loaded and updated as needed at the BMV website.

"Next of Kin (HB 392) – This new statute creates a voluntary program, allowing those with a valid Ohio driver license, commercial driver license, temporary permit or identification card to submit two emergency contacts to the Ohio Bureau of Motor Vehicles (BMV), to be used by law enforcement in the event they are seriously injured or killed in an automobile crash.  If the individual is involved in an emergency situation or is otherwise unable to communicate, law enforcement will use the information to notify these emergency contacts."
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« Reply #27 on: December 04, 2008, 07:51:44 pm »

www.roadid.com  Check out this site, they have some good stuff.
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« Reply #28 on: December 04, 2008, 08:00:19 pm »

All of this is very interesting--when I crashed on my bicycle, my ID, insurance card etc. got cut off with my riding jersey and went away.

Of course, I wasn't alone and Jane-Doe'd when it happened; maybe the EMTs would've check if I were.
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« Reply #29 on: December 05, 2008, 12:14:48 am »

A couple more things;

1. Carrying your blood type is for your information only. Before giving blood, you will be typed and screened. In a STAT situation, O- is given.

2. If traveling outside you home country, a flash drive containing photo copies of important paperwork like your DL, insurance, medi-vac, contact numbers for your CC, pass port, immunizations or any legal documents is not a bad idea.

3. Have somebody you talk to EVERYDAY while on the road, and they have your general route info.Tell them the last place you were and the next place you are going. They should be armed with what to do if you miss a check in.
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« Reply #30 on: December 05, 2008, 08:08:26 am »

Just as a reminder, the STN Locator has an option where you can provide contact information in case of an emergency. If you have it available (bring it with you on a trip), there's a good chance you'll be close to an STNer. Of course not for accidents but we may be able to help with getting your gear or bike from a storage lot and storing it for you until you're able to retrieve it for example.

http://www.stnlocator.net

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« Reply #31 on: December 05, 2008, 01:12:27 pm »

I just have "DNR" tattooed on my chest.  Any it had better be obeyed!!!
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« Reply #32 on: December 09, 2008, 11:00:15 am »

Awesome thread. I really like the dog tag idea and the ResQTag. Looks like I will get both as some here said that info on clothes is not really checked or considered to be 100% reliable.

Thanks for a great thread and invaluable info.

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« Reply #33 on: December 10, 2008, 10:57:22 am »

As a former EMS worker, I can say that the ICoE / pocket stuff does not help much in the field.  If it is that serious, the first and really only priority is to get you stabilized on the way to definitive care (local ER or more likely the nearest trauma center) as quickly and safely as possible.  If you are unconscious from the crash, all of your clothes will be cut off to look for injuries (winter clothes especially can soak up a tremendous amount of blood or hide some serious deformities).  The clothes may or may not end up in the ambulance with you.  Also, pants shred, jackets tear, pockets open, etc, so relying on them to hold you information is not the best course of action.  

However, I still have ICoE programmed onto my phone, as well as contact info in my wallet.  Eventually, someone at the hospital will try and identify you and contact the appropriate people.  If probably won't be the ER staff, but if you are admitted or are stabilized in the ER, someone will go through and try to figure out who you are.  At that point, all the extra pockets / cell phone info may come in handy, assuming it survived the crash and made the trip with you.  I've never seen anyone insert a USB drive into a hospital computer to access it (potential viruses, all the other patient info on the network, etc. scare almost anyone off).

Dog tags or something firmly attached to your person (not string) is the best bet, even if it only has your name and BLOOD TYPE.  I know that in my area, blood shortages are not at all uncommon, so make it as easy as possible to identify to avoid the very nasty transfustion reactions that can occur.  

Also, as an aside, take the 30 minutes to donate on a regular basis, especially in you are a universal donor.  It really can save a life, and karma being what it is, the donation may just save your life as well.
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« Reply #34 on: December 10, 2008, 11:54:58 am »



Also, as an aside, take the 30 minutes to donate on a regular basis, especially in you are a universal donor.  It really can save a life, and karma being what it is, the donation may just save your life as well.


Excellent point.  I donate (my whole family does) on a regular basis.  


« Last Edit: December 10, 2008, 01:02:36 pm by Scoop » Logged

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« Reply #35 on: December 10, 2008, 12:35:53 pm »

I've been wearing a RoadID for 2 years...  I wear it on and off the bike..  you can choose a design for the front and put your emergency info on the back.  I have my husband's two contact numbers and my doctor's name/number as well as my name, etc.  

I believe I had an email at home with a coupon for December if anyone is interested (maybe 10% off or something)
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« Reply #36 on: December 18, 2008, 01:02:57 pm »

What's the bottom line on blood type information?  Is it actually beneficial, or really just unnecessary?
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« Reply #37 on: December 22, 2008, 06:07:26 pm »

Dog tags.  You can order them over the net.  SOP for EMT is to strip you if you could have trauma & are not able to answer questions.  Where it around your neck & they will find it.
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« Reply #38 on: December 22, 2008, 11:30:33 pm »


What's the bottom line on blood type information?  Is it actually beneficial, or really just unnecessary?

As a medical professional for 13 years, I have to say it's pointless.

In a trauma code, they'll give you O neg. w/o typing and cross matching or His-Span blood volume expander. Anything else requires STRICT protocol including type and cross matching. This is done by a Lab tech that verifies patient ID, and at the time of the blood draw, a Holister Blood Band is put on the patient. If that blood band ever comes off, the process must start all over again.

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« Reply #39 on: December 23, 2008, 01:03:57 pm »

There ya go.  So, no point in anything else.  Just tattoo DNR on your chest and be done with it Bigsmile
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« Reply #40 on: December 29, 2008, 09:00:39 am »

Does anybody have any experience with the Medical Type Dog Tags that are a USB memory stick?
 I saw it in Rider, I think.
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« Reply #41 on: December 29, 2008, 09:55:19 am »


Does anybody have any experience with the Medical Type Dog Tags that are a USB memory stick?
 I saw it in Rider, I think.


While it ousnds like a great idea, a few things that one should questios:
Is it going to work? I mean, really, it's been toted around for a few years on your neck, in all kinds of weather(moisture) then exposed to the forces of a crash before it is expected to be used.

Assuming it does still work who is going to plug it in? Emergenct personel aren't going to take the time, or have the equipment (remote areas) and hospital personell are so scared of anything to do with thier network that they won't touch anything with asking IT, and they are going to reccomend not plugging it in.

Severe alergies aside modern ER's can handle everything they need to know on their own. The rest of your info will be obtained from law enforcement via your vehicle registration. Some time we put far to much thought into things like this.
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« Reply #42 on: December 30, 2008, 11:31:50 am »

The rest of your info will be obtained from law enforcement via your vehicle registration.


So far only a few states allow you to attach emergency contact information to your driver's license (not registration). If you live in one of those states, by all means DO IT. But it's not universal, and it may only include contact information, not allergies.
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« Reply #43 on: December 31, 2008, 01:10:35 am »


Severe alergies aside modern ER's can handle everything they need to know on their own. The rest of your info will be obtained from law enforcement via your vehicle registration. Some time we put far to much thought into things like this.


As an ER nurse, I have to disagree with this in a general sense.

Yes, we can save your life in most cases, but knowing your past surgeries, current meds and chronic conditions or diagnosis like hypertension, COPD, CHF, MI's, A-FIB, or GI Bleed will help us provide you the BEST and most appropriate care.

And after all, who would want to set up a situation where you would deny yourself that?
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« Reply #44 on: January 01, 2009, 12:19:49 pm »

I wear a MedicAlert bracelet that says "NO CODE-DO NOT RESUSCITATE-ORGAN DONER".
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« Reply #45 on: January 02, 2009, 04:43:08 pm »


I wear a MedicAlert bracelet that says "NO CODE-DO NOT RESUSCITATE-ORGAN DONER".

I like that.  I must get me one like that.  Then I won't have to get DNR tattooed on my chest.
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« Reply #46 on: January 04, 2009, 07:37:01 pm »

As a Deputy Sheriff with over 20 years experience, I have been to many bad accidents. If you crash and I get to you first, I'm not going to use my time to try and search you or your bike for info about you. Your name isn't important right at that moment. I'd stay at your side doing all I'm trained to do until EMTs arrive. I would check out your condition but not your pockets.
  I carry a spare key and a laminated version of this.... http://www.medids.com/free-id.php  around my neck when I ride. I figure if I crash, someones going to cut off most of my clothes so no point in filling my pockets with stuff. A small tag on the side or back of my helmet might be missed. Not many people are realistically going to have time to plug in a memory stick into a lap top and try and figure out who I am either.
  At work, the info is printed on the carrier of the body armor.

Just my 2 cents worth. Erik.
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« Reply #47 on: January 05, 2009, 07:54:43 pm »

Folks,

I don't post much but I felt I needed to comment here.  I am a 28 year Paramedic, Coroner's death investigator and EMS instructor.  There has been some good comments from LEO, RN's other EMT's and Paramedics and even firefighters about this and I wanted to both chime in and emphasize a critical point.  The only place the DOT curriculum specifies for prehospital providers to obtain medical history if you or your family cannot provide it immediately is the Medic Alert bracelet and neck chain system if you are on the road and vial of life in/on the refrigerator at your house. Some folks have mentioned dog tags, They are workable but may not be examined if they don't have that red star of life to indicate medical information.

ICE is a creation of some European (London) EMS medics and the internet.  No professional responder on the scene is going to access your cell phone for info.  We have no way of relating the phone to the person, no way of confirming identity and if you have a decreased LOC and cannot provide your history, we are not going to be looking for it right now anyway.  Knowing your basic medical history at this point is a nice to have, not need to have.  Once you are at the hospital, the need for more detailed medical information will develop and can be managed.

We (my service) does not have protocols for ICE and if we did, they would state not to call.  The last thing you have time to do at this point is talk to someone on the phone who you may scare, misinform or even cause injury to if they panic and rush to the scene or hospital.  

If you have ever been the charge nurse at the ER, Police Officer or  Death Investigator, you know how difficult that phone call to the family is, and it has to be handled correctly.

Personally, I like the Rescutag on my jacket zipper, but I will not count on it being seen, Medic Alert on either wrist is going to be seen and examined.

Sorry about the tone, don't mean to preach but unless this becomes a DOT knowledge objective, ICE is not good information.

Chris


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« Reply #48 on: January 09, 2009, 04:32:53 pm »

As an ER nurse....

Yes, we can save your life in most cases, but knowing your past surgeries, current meds and chronic conditions or diagnosis like hypertension, COPD, CHF, MI's, A-FIB, or GI Bleed will help us provide you the BEST and most appropriate care.

And after all, who would want to set up a situation where you would deny yourself that?

Where / how do you propose, suggest, reccommend we have that information that it will be found and used?
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« Reply #49 on: January 14, 2009, 07:19:26 pm »

I think memory sticks are a lame-o idea. ICE on the cell phone is slightly above lame-o, though I do it anyway. Couldn't hurt. I tried the laminated Med-ID card but found it to be uncomfortable. I wear dog tags. Tag 1 has my name, blood type, "no allergies" and "no current meds." Tag 2 has contact info for my wife and a backup. If my medical situation changes I'll update Tag 1.

If you ever meet me when I'm on the road away from my house, and I'm not wearing my dog tags, you have my permission to punch me in the arm. Hard.
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« Reply #50 on: January 25, 2009, 08:57:10 am »


www.roadid.com  Check out this site, they have some good stuff.


+1 on Road ID.  Wear it everytime I ride.  
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« Reply #51 on: January 26, 2009, 03:53:23 am »



Where / how do you propose, suggest, reccommend we have that information that it will be found and used?


Around your neck, like Dog Tags.
When I get the chance, I'll post pics of mine.

Keep in mind one of the very first things EMT's and ER Nurses do in the case of an unconscience person is cut your clothes off. We are used to looking for Medic Alert tags.

I all my years working in the ER, l have never looked in a wallet unless I needed to notify next of kin.
We don't look at cell phones except for the same reason.


In my case, M/C crash, fractured back, 1500 miles from home, at 0300, in a chopper the Flight Nurses found my tag around my neck and used it. The ER staff did the same thing and called my S.O. from it while I was too rattled from the concussion to give good, clear info.
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« Reply #52 on: January 29, 2009, 01:09:41 pm »


www.roadid.com  Check out this site, they have some good stuff.


I just ordered one of the ID bracelets last week. If anyone is interested in ordering one, I got a discount code for $1 off (hey, a buck is a buck!):  

Coupon Number:  ThanksTyler458204

Good thru Feb. 24th.  Smile
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« Reply #53 on: February 05, 2009, 03:41:51 pm »

[quote

There is NO logic that justifies NOT putting an I.C.E. entry in your cell phone.  The boy scouts and military taught me that preperation effects final results.

[/quote]

GOOD POINT!!   From a f/f emt
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« Reply #54 on: February 05, 2009, 04:25:20 pm »

As promised, here is the card I wear around my neck, FWIW.

Because meds change, I have them on a separate card, but worn together.



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« Reply #55 on: February 18, 2009, 09:51:10 am »

A lot of that info translates into english easily enough - but some of it does not.
Do you mind translating the acronyms and professional jargon into one / two syllable words for us?
It would NOT be OK for me to attempt to use the format you've used without understanding what it means.
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« Reply #56 on: February 18, 2009, 10:34:02 am »


A lot of that info translates into english easily enough - but some of it does not.
Do you mind translating the acronyms and professional jargon into one / two syllable words for us?
It would NOT be OK for me to attempt to use the format you've used without understanding what it means.



Med (Hx) History: (RAD) Reactive Airway Disease, (GERD's) Gastroesophageal reflux disease, (+) positive for exposure to (TB) Tuberculosis, treated with (INH) Isoniazid, (MI?) possibile Myocardial infarction (Heart Attack), (PVC's) Premature ventricular contraction.

Other side.

(NKDA)  no known drug allergies, intolerant of (NSAIDS) Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, (=) causes (gastric pain) upsets my stomach, (Surg. Hx.) Surgery History, Caesarean section, breast reduction, (bi-lat carpal tun. release) both wrist had carpal tunnel surgery, (hysterectomy) took out the factory but left the play ground, (cholicysectomy) gall bladder removed, (Fx) fractures (R) right and (L) left (clavicals) collar bones, (Fx) fractures of (T6 & T7) thoracic vertebrae number 6 and 7, (Fx) fractures of spinus processes of thoracic vertebrae number 5 thru 10 on (L) left side.

All the fractures are the result of several motorcycle crashes.

As a medical professional, I used terms MD's and Nurses would have no problem understanding. If you or any one's wants me the translate common terms into medical-eze I'd be happy to help thru Private Message.
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« Reply #57 on: February 23, 2009, 09:00:42 pm »

Hi Jeff,   ya damn stalker.  Twofinger Inlove
No  Razz we'er not married yet, but I was planning ahead.  Bigsmile

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« Reply #58 on: February 24, 2009, 04:41:07 pm »

 Headscratch

Stalker I have been called a lot of thinks but never a stalker.  Lol

I say the pic from you and had to do it Sorry

I better get an invite to the wedding.  Bigok
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« Reply #59 on: March 28, 2009, 10:08:13 pm »



Just tag me & bag me.    Twofinger
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« Reply #60 on: March 29, 2009, 11:12:49 am »




Just tag me & bag me.    Twofinger


Hey, where can I get one of those??
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« Reply #61 on: March 29, 2009, 12:43:09 pm »




Just tag me & bag me.    Twofinger


Where can I get one that says "Money Is No Object"?

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« Reply #62 on: March 29, 2009, 02:25:28 pm »

On the DNR request perhaps some could clear up one of my "I've been tolds"...

The DNR notices have no legal standing in the field. The medics/ambulance crew WILL try to resuscitate (even if they know of the 'request'). It's when you get to the hospital / legal world that the DNR legal issue may take effect.

True / False / It Depends?
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« Reply #63 on: March 30, 2009, 04:35:30 am »


On the DNR request perhaps some could clear up one of my "I've been tolds"...

The DNR notices have no legal standing in the field. The medics/ambulance crew WILL try to resuscitate (even if they know of the 'request'). It's when you get to the hospital / legal world that the DNR legal issue may take effect.

True / False / It Depends?



According to the EMS personnel I spoke with, you MUST have The ORGINAL Durable DNR sheet on your person at that time.
The ACTUAL paper, nothing else will be honored. (however, some said if they saw a card around the neck, or some other indication that the person they were working on did not wish to be resuscitated, they might not try as hard)

Here is the state of Virginia's Durable DNR fact sheet.
http://www.vdh.virginia.gov/OEMS/Files_Page/DDNR/DDNRFactSheet.pdf

In the above, it does say "If the patient is wearing an authorized DDNR necklace or bracelet an original form is not needed".

Worse yet, even with a DDNR, it's only valid in the state it was written. There is no guaranteed state to state honoring of Living Wills or DDNR forms.  Sad
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« Reply #64 on: March 30, 2009, 12:51:28 pm »

The PHYSICIAN has to authorize the DNR????  So, how does one actually get one then?
How about tattoos?  Do they honour tattoos that say DNR?
It's hard to get away from good help these days!!  
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« Reply #65 on: March 30, 2009, 01:13:33 pm »


The PHYSICIAN has to authorize the DNR????  So, how does one actually get one then?
How about tattoos?  Do they honour tattoos that say DNR?
It's hard to get away from good help these days!!  


Google Baby!  Thumbsup

http://www.ofm.gov.on.ca/english/Publications/DNRCF.asp
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« Reply #66 on: March 30, 2009, 06:25:51 pm »

Sheesh, what a crock.  Remind me to go way off a cliff where I can't be found.  
If anyone revives me, be warned that I will regain my health, then come after them!!
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« Reply #67 on: May 01, 2009, 12:37:16 pm »

standard fare in my jacket is,

SPOT transmitter.
Combat field dressing.
Knife to cut clothing open when needed....riding to local med center for stitches or bone setting while in my underwear not a choice.

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« Reply #68 on: May 28, 2009, 05:36:37 pm »

Just ordered the RoadID dog tags for $22 or so.  I plan to use them for riding, cycling, running and other things.  Here is a coupon for y'all to use good for the next 30 days for $1 off usable up to 20 times.

ThanksGregory492144
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« Reply #69 on: July 16, 2009, 09:21:21 am »

Why would anyone not want to be resusitated? If you want to be dead that bad why not just do yourself in?
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« Reply #70 on: July 31, 2009, 02:05:20 pm »

There used to be a PDF format card that was floating around that I used to have on my helmet under a clear waterproofed covering.

It had all important info on it as well as emergency contacts and what not and had "DO NOT REMOVE HELMET" written around the outside.  That helmet actually still has that info taped to it though it has been retired to a shelf in the back.  It even had a prited tape across the bottom of the chin bar that said in bold letters "DO NOT REMOVE HELMET UNTIL EXAMINED BY MEDICAL PERSONEL!!"

I was never really concerned with EMTs and other medical professionals I was always worried about a motorist meaning well coming by and trying to wrestle my helmet off after an accidnet that left me uncounsious.
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« Reply #71 on: July 31, 2009, 08:19:43 pm »


Why would anyone not want to be resusitated? If you want to be dead that bad why not just do yourself in?


I don't want to be dead necessarily, I just don't want to be subjected to the sure and slow death in the hospital.  If I'm gone, I'm gone.  Leave me in the ditch please.
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« Reply #72 on: August 16, 2009, 10:25:08 am »

There are a lot of great ideas here, some of them I want to do, dog tags or wrist band, but just have not gotten around to it, just like most people.  What I have done is place a print out of my emergency data and contact information right behind my Drivers License, eventually it will get looked at.  As a Paramedic on a trauma scene or an unconscious person call, after I have started life saving steps I'll try to find ID and medical history. This might not happen until after I get the patient to the hospital, it depends on how busy I was trying to save their life. The easier it is to find and use the better its going to be for us. If you actually wear a wallet keep your emergency data with your license, or use one of the dog tag or wrist band that is physically on you.
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« Reply #73 on: September 17, 2009, 07:46:43 am »


The Army taught me the answer to this...dog tags.

I never ride without having a dog tag and a spare key to the bike around my neck.  The dog tag contain my name, address, phone number and blood type.   Wink


I always wear my old army dog tags. One thing about the military is they have pretty good records Smile
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« Reply #74 on: November 28, 2009, 04:20:29 pm »

Anyone on here have a concealed carry license? Any of you Police/Fire/Medic types know if someone will check clothes for a weapon? Or would they leave it lying around for whomever to come across? EEK! I been thinking about this and this thread brought it to mind again.
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« Reply #75 on: December 12, 2009, 07:31:29 pm »

I just got the Smart-ICE app for my iPhone. I thought of one of the flash drive options that I've seen, but they need to plug it into a computer to read it. This way it's right on my phone, where they'll most likely look for ICE info.

As to mahrtn's question, from my experience working with emergency service providers, they're very conscientious and if they find a weapon, would likely hand it over to the LEO's to secure. Any medic worth his weight would find a firearm on your person while looking for injuries.
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« Reply #76 on: December 30, 2009, 03:21:18 am »

I tried the ICE number set up but did it wrong.  So, when I called my wife on my cell phone, she thought it was a company named ICE.  I need to work on it a little more.

I have the emergency info in my First Aid kit, so when the kit is opened, there's the info.   I like the idea of having it condensed onto a card that is carried in my jacket pocket, and billfold, and I like the idea of having it within a dealeo on my helmet.  Now here's some good stuff to do while it's raining outside this winter.

I have a 20 dollar bill in a zip lock, in my wee little tool kit under the seat.  I carry a spare key in my billfold.  I don't think 20 dollars will get much service these days, so I'm going to put another 40 dollars somewhere, my helmet maybe, or securely strapped onto my bike someplace.  I need to figure it out.

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« Reply #77 on: December 30, 2009, 04:13:41 pm »

Any US STN member coming over the the UK is welcome to use me for a base, and for emergency contacts.

PM me me if you are coming over.
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« Reply #78 on: January 05, 2010, 10:18:26 am »

I thank the LEOs, paramedics etc who have posted here.   It's useful to hear how the people who scrape us off the road would respond to the various ideas for i/d.

But I find it a little sad that the general theme from the LEOs~ has been "we won't look for this info, and even if we find it we won't use it.".  Why not?  Because they might get into trouble, it's "against regulations".

I don't blame the LEOs ~ , they are only behaving in the way they are contractually required to behave. But isn't it sad that they can't accept a DNR tattoo, or phone a number on a bracelet, or check the contents of a wallet?
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« Reply #79 on: January 06, 2010, 04:15:48 pm »


Anyone on here have a concealed carry license? Any of you Police/Fire/Medic types know if someone will check clothes for a weapon? Or would they leave it lying around for whomever to come across? EEK! I been thinking about this and this thread brought it to mind again.


As a F/F's who works inner city area, we have found more than a few weapons. Cops find a real lot. When they roll a car the guns usually fly out the windows w/the occupants who don't exactly wear Bianchi holsters... it's more like Einstein Burris [Giants player] sticking it in his sweatpants Lol Lol Lol Lol Lol
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« Reply #80 on: January 14, 2010, 05:16:09 pm »

I have one of these for cycling
http://www.roadid.com/Common/default.aspx
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« Reply #81 on: March 18, 2010, 12:18:31 pm »

I thought I'd chime in too.  I used a label maker and put a large enough white label with red font with the following info near the helemt straps;
-Name
-emergency contact number
-blood type

My thinking is the helmet will be removed at some point and hopefully either EMT or hospital will see the label when they cut the helmet off.

I like alot of the inputs posted and will keep a card with detailed info in my jacket and wallet.

Thanks
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« Reply #82 on: March 30, 2010, 02:26:06 am »

+1 on the dog tags. Name, SSN, and blood type. Although...Am I right in thinking that you ER professionals can look up what you need to know with my SSN or should I have more info printed on the tag? Maybe just add NKDA?
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« Reply #83 on: May 09, 2010, 12:57:20 pm »


I have spoken to some EMTs about the "ICE" contact in a cell phone.  They have all shrugged and said they'd never heard of such a thing.    I ordered one of those things from Cyclegadgets.com...seems like a good thing.


I've been an active EMT since '06, and I admit I had never heard about "ICE" until a couple years back, even then it seems no one uses it.  I've had to resort to looking for "mom" or "dad" in a youngsters cell phone. It seems to be picking up speed though, I've seen some of these newer phones have an easily accesable ICE button/icon in the cell phone.  
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« Reply #84 on: May 15, 2010, 12:55:20 am »


There is NO logic that justifies NOT putting an I.C.E. entry in your cell phone.  The boy scouts and military taught me that preperation effects final results.



You mean logic like "What the hell does it matter if my emergency contact isn't notified immediately?"

KeS
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« Reply #85 on: May 28, 2010, 06:43:06 pm »


I have one of these for cycling
http://www.roadid.com/Common/default.aspx



+1 for Road ID, I have one for when I run and will wear it when I hit the road July 4th weekend

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« Reply #86 on: May 31, 2010, 01:16:22 pm »


  I carry a spare key and a laminated version of this.... http://www.medids.com/free-id.php  around my neck when I ride. I figure if I crash, someones going to cut off most of my clothes so no point in filling my pockets with stuff. A small tag on the side or back of my helmet might be missed. Not many people are realistically going to have time to plug in a memory stick into a lap top and try and figure out who I am either.



+1 on FREE, combined with the fact that you can update it as needed and include routine meds etc.


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« Reply #87 on: June 02, 2010, 01:58:03 pm »

Good tips ,  I keep a card in my wallet that says in case of Emergency call ..

Also as I have a fairly unusual last name ( only 19 of us in NA), and I always carry my cell, it's not a big leap for them to figure out who to call.
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« Reply #88 on: June 03, 2010, 08:09:50 pm »


+1 on the dog tags. Name, SSN, and blood type. Although...Am I right in thinking that you ER professionals can look up what you need to know with my SSN or should I have more info printed on the tag? Maybe just add NKDA?


 Headscratch  Didn't know ERs could look people up by SSN unless they were already in the system.  That might work for your local hospital, but I don't think it would work when traveling.

Point of contact name and phone number, next of kin, ALLERGIES if any (which you don't).

Keep a copy of your insurance card in as many places as you can -- pockets, bags, etc.

Quote
Also as I have a fairly unusual last name ( only 19 of us in NA), and I always carry my cell, it's not a big leap for them to figure out who to call


A cell can be broken during the crash or thrown down the road and lost.
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« Reply #89 on: August 19, 2010, 05:44:10 am »

the above list of goods would be utterly essential in any emergency. Thank you.
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« Reply #90 on: September 05, 2010, 01:14:59 am »




I don't want to be dead necessarily, I just don't want to be subjected to the sure and slow death in the hospital.  If I'm gone, I'm gone.  Leave me in the ditch please.


God Bless the EMT's... for if it wasn't for them doing such a Great Job on me in '83 I wouldn't be here today enjoying all of the fantastic riding that I've had the pleasure of. Not all folks resuscitated have a "sure & slow death in the hospital".  
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« Reply #91 on: September 30, 2010, 09:57:36 am »


In light of a new season coming on, and some other instances that have happened to me, and others recently, I just wanted to bring this up.

What happens when shit happens and you are not able to talk to answer questions? Who do you want contacted in case of an accident? What type blood do you have? Insurance info?

Where do you keep this info so that it is readily available? In your pockets? In the tail section of your bike? Tank bag?

What happens if the bike burns and all of that info is destroyed?

1st off, use the I.C.E. system in your cell phone. (In Case of Emergency) This is recognized as a fast way to look up contact info for the ones you want called in case of an accident. Failing that, what next?

I recommend using the medical pouches that attach to your helmet. Enter all pertanant info on the sheet and then attach it to your helmet. It will be visable there and readily available to EMT personnel.

This company will send you one a month for free as well.

http://www.cyclegadgets.com/Products/product.asp?Item=MICS

I just ordered 10 of them in addition to the free one and will be handing them out to everyone the next time I head to Deals Gap!


I am new here, but I am a bicyclist as well and there is a great company called roadID, they can be found at www.roadid.com This is one of the best companies I have ever dealt with. They have several product options, including dogtags. I use the wrist ID's, I have 2 of them, very stylish as well. I use the interactive version. I could explain it all, but it is best just to check out the site. Thanks for listening.
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« Reply #92 on: October 22, 2010, 08:41:08 pm »




God Bless the EMT's... for if it wasn't for them doing such a Great Job on me in '83 I wouldn't be here today enjoying all of the fantastic riding that I've had the pleasure of. Not all folks resuscitated have a "sure & slow death in the hospital".  


Yes, but odds are.....
The sure and slow death doesn't come from the injury.  It comes from the C Difficile that you catch while in the hospital and the multitude of side effects from the meds given to counteract the ongoing side effects from other meds that were given to try to deal with the illness that you picked up from the frickin hospital in the first place.  Not to mention the "wet behind the ears" youngsters that are graduating from med school these days and pretending to be doctors.  Sorry if I go against everyone else, but I have a very firm belief that hospitals are a very good place not to ever be.  I am resolved to fight to the best of my abilities to not be taken there.  If I am not able to fight, then I will be leaving the second that I am able.  My kids have very clear instructions to remove me from any hospital regardless of risk or cost.  Wrong or right, it's my opinion and it's based on solid evidence.  At least around here anyway!
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« Reply #93 on: November 18, 2010, 11:07:01 am »



 Sorry if I go against everyone else, but I have a very firm belief that hospitals are a very good place not to ever be.  I am resolved to fight to the best of my abilities to not be taken there.  If I am not able to fight, then I will be leaving the second that I am able.  My kids have very clear instructions to remove me from any hospital regardless of risk or cost.  Wrong or right, it's my opinion and it's based on solid evidence.  At least around here anyway!


As a lifelong motorcyclist, emergency nurse (at least that seems life-long), retired helicopter flight nurse / paramedic who has worked in many settings in a long, satisfying career, I can hardly agree with you more.  Do not allow any of your loved ones to be admitted to a hospital for any reason unless they are accompanied 24/7 by a knowledgeable advocate.    The level of experience in emergency departments around here and elsewhere is appalling.  And heaven forbid that you crash in July when the medical / surgical residency programs absorb another load of newly graduated "physicians".

Another observation is..... there is no need to put your blood type on any identification.  We're not going to pay any attention or believe it anyway.  If you need blood you are either going to wait (if you can) until your type and crossmatch is finished or you are going to receive O negative, the universal donor type.

What we in the emergency professions need to know is your approximate age, any medications, any allergies, any pertinent medical history, and the mechanism of injury that resulted in your coming to see us.

As for me, I just ordered a "RoadID".  Thanks for that suggestion.  My wife and sons will be the best guide of medical care should I be rendered unable to do so... so I have listed their contact methods there.

Wow, a really opinionated first post, huh?  Smile

Safe riding!

Dwain
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« Reply #94 on: January 14, 2011, 11:27:44 am »

A very good first post.    This info right here

Quote
What we in the emergency professions need to know is your approximate age, any medications, any allergies, any pertinent medical history, and the mechanism of injury that resulted in your coming to see us.


Is invaluable as anything else.  It SIMPLIFIES what we need to carry.  That tiny amount of info can be easily applied to any helmet via a label maker and put on a dog tag or something like that and take up very little space.  Mine would go something like this.  Infact I'm about to do a label for my helmet now.  Maybe color it red??

Dxxxx, Jxxxxx D. (xs will equal real info lol)
Age: 25
NKMA (is this a commonly accepted abbreviation for No Known Medical Allergies?  This is what the Navy docs write all over our stuff)

Currently my helmet sports a label maker sticker on the chinbar that states "DO NOT REMOVE HELMET UNTIL EXAMINED BY MEDICAL PERSONNEL!"

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« Reply #95 on: January 14, 2011, 11:37:12 am »



Currently my helmet sports a label maker sticker on the chinbar that states "DO NOT REMOVE HELMET UNTIL EXAMINED BY MEDICAL PERSONNEL!"




LOL... good luck with that one. One of my rising buddies broke his neck, first thing the EMT's wanted to do was remove his helmet Rolleyes
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« Reply #96 on: January 14, 2011, 07:29:53 pm »

Here are some pics.  Thinking of trying to find RED tape or edge the name, age, ect in red with a red sharpie or something.  Or just leave it like it is.





Some small reflective triangles I cut from a large sheet of reflective material.
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« Reply #97 on: January 23, 2011, 08:02:18 pm »


Some small reflective triangles I cut from a large sheet of reflective material.



Too bad about the typo on the bottom sticker  Lol

Yeah, I wish that there was a better and more consistent way of putting information like this on a helmet.  Sad
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« Reply #98 on: January 23, 2011, 10:09:49 pm »


Too bad about the typo on the bottom sticker  Lol


Lol That's the first thing I saw, too.

I made one of those emergency contact cards like Gwen posted earlier in the thread and laminated it.  I put it on a lanyard to wear around my neck (under my jacket) on long solo rides....er, assuming I do that again someday.

Peter thinks I'm being totally morbid and is a little creeped out.  But hey, I think it's best to be prepared.  Thumbsup
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« Reply #99 on: January 24, 2011, 02:12:36 pm »

lacking some universal deal, I've been wearing one of these for the last couple of years . . . . I cannot comment on their effectiveness, thank goodness.

http://www.whitehorsegear.com/medical-information-carrier-system
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« Reply #100 on: January 28, 2011, 12:22:48 pm »




Too bad about the typo on the bottom sticker  Lol

Yeah, I wish that there was a better and more consistent way of putting information like this on a helmet.  Sad


Who said the guys who are doing helmet stickers for brain buckets knew anything aboot spelling  Lol
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« Reply #101 on: January 31, 2011, 08:08:17 am »

I recorded all my relevant emergency info (mostly phone numbers and meds) on a USB drive that's designed to be worn like dogtags.   It's labeled "Emergency Info" on the outhside.
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« Reply #102 on: March 08, 2011, 12:01:33 am »

I went to this site that was recommended in a prior post  http://www.medids.com/free-id.php and printed out the free ID cards that you can laminate and carry with you (Name, DOB, emergency contacts, physician name and phone #, conditions, allergies, meds, and place to enter other info. You can update for free any time you wish or save to a secure website at a small charge and don't need to retype all the information each time.

Might also order a RoadID wrist band since it appears to be a good alternative, as do the dogtags on a neck chain. As a former EMT/First Responder I was taught to look for those visual items that a person might be wearing in addition to med-alert tags.

Thanks for the suggestions everyone.
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« Reply #103 on: March 08, 2011, 09:08:19 am »

I just can't have anything on my wrists when I'm riding cause I have my riding gear on and it bugs the living crap out of me lol.
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« Reply #104 on: March 08, 2011, 11:40:35 am »

What do the board medics think about zip tieing a laminated card to a zipper on the jacket?  Now that I've worn it a couple of times, I can't imagine wanting to wear my little laminated card around my neck on each and every ride but I could attach it to the outside breast pocket on my jacket.  Would that be totally ignored or un-noticed?  Headscratch
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« Reply #105 on: April 08, 2011, 08:53:58 pm »

I have been a Firefighter / Paramedic for 17 years. I have never been on a severe accident when I have had time too look for, or even worry about a contact persons info. If i am lucky, I find something with a name on it. I think its important to realize that these are issues that are delt with long and I mean long after arrival to a hospital. Just carry a drivers license and the rest will fall into place. If the accident is that severe, most of your medical history is of little concern. Your life threatening injuries that were sustained in the crash are far more important.  
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« Reply #106 on: April 25, 2011, 04:32:37 pm »


What do the board medics think about zip tieing a laminated card to a zipper on the jacket?  Now that I've worn it a couple of times, I can't imagine wanting to wear my little laminated card around my neck on each and every ride but I could attach it to the outside breast pocket on my jacket.  Would that be totally ignored or un-noticed?  Headscratch


Seems like after a while you would risk having it rip off the jacket and wind up on the road with a bunch of your personal info on it.  Depending on what you put on it.
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« Reply #107 on: April 25, 2011, 11:03:52 pm »


I have been a Firefighter / Paramedic for 17 years. I have never been on a severe accident when I have had time too look for, or even worry about a contact persons info. If i am lucky, I find something with a name on it. I think its important to realize that these are issues that are delt with long and I mean long after arrival to a hospital. Just carry a drivers license and the rest will fall into place. If the accident is that severe, most of your medical history is of little concern. Your life threatening injuries that were sustained in the crash are far more important.  


 Thumbsup  sometimes we spend way too much time thinking about things that don't matter Wink
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« Reply #108 on: January 30, 2013, 07:56:26 pm »

I was a volunteer fireman for 35 years and most of the calls were MV accidents.  While we were working on the injured we gave all ID's to the police so they could notify the families.  We would hand all wallets and purses to the cops.  If the injured were able to talk we would use their first name to maintain contact and give comfort.  When we had an injured person with a helmet on we left the bucket on the head, stabilized the neck and strapped them on the back board.  Removing bucket could move the neck and cause more damage.  On some injured people, leaving the helmet on was mandatory because it helped hold the bones and muscle together for the doctors to work with.

I left the fire service because my hearing got so bad I could not hear warnings and orders.  Got toooo unsafe for me and others.  I really miss those guys. (guys and gals)
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« Reply #109 on: January 31, 2013, 11:54:53 pm »

Thank you for giving what service you could when you could  Bigok
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« Reply #110 on: February 04, 2013, 07:20:17 pm »


I have been a Firefighter / Paramedic for 17 years. I have never been on a severe accident when I have had time too look for, or even worry about a contact persons info. If i am lucky, I find something with a name on it. I think its important to realize that these are issues that are delt with long and I mean long after arrival to a hospital. Just carry a drivers license and the rest will fall into place. If the accident is that severe, most of your medical history is of little concern. Your life threatening injuries that were sustained in the crash are far more important.  


^this. I was a medic/FF for 15 years and a medical bracelet was the most commonly recognized item. Other than that, medics aren't going to go through pockets, inspect stickers on helmets or look for flash drives hidden on your bike. Except for the bracelet, how would you know if any of the gear the person was wearing was his or hers-borrowed? Can't take the chance...
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« Reply #111 on: February 04, 2013, 08:21:12 pm »

Here's a question that maybe you medic-type peeps can answer for me.   Peter somehow got his old PO Box listed on his driver's license instead of our home address (I know you're not supposed to be able to do this, but it somehow got through the system).

So, my question is:  does this really matter? Like, if he were to be in an accident, say, and they use his driver's license as ID, does having the physical address of the house aid anyone in any way?  Or does it really not matter?  I'm not sure whether I should push him to change the address on his license or not.
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« Reply #112 on: February 04, 2013, 10:32:00 pm »

How about some of these? http://www.mydogtag.com/
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« Reply #113 on: July 18, 2013, 05:41:41 pm »

just a couple points as a person who has been unconscious and helped by EMTs after a crash. One  my helmet was taped to a back board immediately to stabilize my neck. no one is going to see any info on the back of the helmet. Two  my pants and jacket or cut off immediately BUT the tech still found my legally carred concealed weapon when he tried to cut though it while cutting off my pants. he gave it to a state police officer who later returned it to me and no the officer was not nice about it at all. No one looked though my pockets and my phone was in my tank bag and  never made it through the crash. when i finally woke and was stable they asked me directly about my info.
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« Reply #114 on: June 20, 2014, 04:02:27 pm »

Haven't read all the posts here but for someone in my position, meaning no health/prescription issues, I have typed up a list of people and their pertinent info and listed them as Emergency Contacts on a red piece of paper next to my driver's license. That is where medical or ER people would go to find my name and so forth anyway. I always tell those on the list I will be on the road so they can be prepared for the worst case scenario should it happen.

Info on helmet, on/in bike, zipped in an inside pocket somewhere can be easily overlooked when everyone is trying to help a seriously injured accident victim that is unconscious or loopy.
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« Reply #115 on: March 20, 2015, 09:33:19 am »

ok but i think that the better place for information like this is your bike clothing because if your bike is heavily damaged nobody will find your piece of paper ever.
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« Reply #116 on: March 20, 2015, 06:02:38 pm »

I'm not the sharpest pencil in the box but ER/police are always going for the drivers license and they will have to move the "red" ER/info piece of paper wrapped around my DL to see who I am. A no brainer for me.
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