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Topic: Emergency Contact Info  (Read 110594 times)

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jeepinbanditrider
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« Reply #100 on: January 28, 2011, 12:22:48 pm »




Too bad about the typo on the bottom sticker  Lol

Yeah, I wish that there was a better and more consistent way of putting information like this on a helmet.  Sad


Who said the guys who are doing helmet stickers for brain buckets knew anything aboot spelling  Lol
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« Reply #101 on: January 31, 2011, 08:08:17 am »

I recorded all my relevant emergency info (mostly phone numbers and meds) on a USB drive that's designed to be worn like dogtags.   It's labeled "Emergency Info" on the outhside.
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« Reply #102 on: March 08, 2011, 12:01:33 am »

I went to this site that was recommended in a prior post  http://www.medids.com/free-id.php and printed out the free ID cards that you can laminate and carry with you (Name, DOB, emergency contacts, physician name and phone #, conditions, allergies, meds, and place to enter other info. You can update for free any time you wish or save to a secure website at a small charge and don't need to retype all the information each time.

Might also order a RoadID wrist band since it appears to be a good alternative, as do the dogtags on a neck chain. As a former EMT/First Responder I was taught to look for those visual items that a person might be wearing in addition to med-alert tags.

Thanks for the suggestions everyone.
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jeepinbanditrider
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« Reply #103 on: March 08, 2011, 09:08:19 am »

I just can't have anything on my wrists when I'm riding cause I have my riding gear on and it bugs the living crap out of me lol.
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« Reply #104 on: March 08, 2011, 11:40:35 am »

What do the board medics think about zip tieing a laminated card to a zipper on the jacket?  Now that I've worn it a couple of times, I can't imagine wanting to wear my little laminated card around my neck on each and every ride but I could attach it to the outside breast pocket on my jacket.  Would that be totally ignored or un-noticed?  Headscratch
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« Reply #105 on: April 08, 2011, 08:53:58 pm »

I have been a Firefighter / Paramedic for 17 years. I have never been on a severe accident when I have had time too look for, or even worry about a contact persons info. If i am lucky, I find something with a name on it. I think its important to realize that these are issues that are delt with long and I mean long after arrival to a hospital. Just carry a drivers license and the rest will fall into place. If the accident is that severe, most of your medical history is of little concern. Your life threatening injuries that were sustained in the crash are far more important.  
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jeepinbanditrider
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« Reply #106 on: April 25, 2011, 04:32:37 pm »


What do the board medics think about zip tieing a laminated card to a zipper on the jacket?  Now that I've worn it a couple of times, I can't imagine wanting to wear my little laminated card around my neck on each and every ride but I could attach it to the outside breast pocket on my jacket.  Would that be totally ignored or un-noticed?  Headscratch


Seems like after a while you would risk having it rip off the jacket and wind up on the road with a bunch of your personal info on it.  Depending on what you put on it.
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« Reply #107 on: April 25, 2011, 11:03:52 pm »


I have been a Firefighter / Paramedic for 17 years. I have never been on a severe accident when I have had time too look for, or even worry about a contact persons info. If i am lucky, I find something with a name on it. I think its important to realize that these are issues that are delt with long and I mean long after arrival to a hospital. Just carry a drivers license and the rest will fall into place. If the accident is that severe, most of your medical history is of little concern. Your life threatening injuries that were sustained in the crash are far more important.  


 Thumbsup  sometimes we spend way too much time thinking about things that don't matter Wink
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« Reply #108 on: January 30, 2013, 07:56:26 pm »

I was a volunteer fireman for 35 years and most of the calls were MV accidents.  While we were working on the injured we gave all ID's to the police so they could notify the families.  We would hand all wallets and purses to the cops.  If the injured were able to talk we would use their first name to maintain contact and give comfort.  When we had an injured person with a helmet on we left the bucket on the head, stabilized the neck and strapped them on the back board.  Removing bucket could move the neck and cause more damage.  On some injured people, leaving the helmet on was mandatory because it helped hold the bones and muscle together for the doctors to work with.

I left the fire service because my hearing got so bad I could not hear warnings and orders.  Got toooo unsafe for me and others.  I really miss those guys. (guys and gals)
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« Reply #109 on: January 31, 2013, 11:54:53 pm »

Thank you for giving what service you could when you could  Bigok
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« Reply #110 on: February 04, 2013, 07:20:17 pm »


I have been a Firefighter / Paramedic for 17 years. I have never been on a severe accident when I have had time too look for, or even worry about a contact persons info. If i am lucky, I find something with a name on it. I think its important to realize that these are issues that are delt with long and I mean long after arrival to a hospital. Just carry a drivers license and the rest will fall into place. If the accident is that severe, most of your medical history is of little concern. Your life threatening injuries that were sustained in the crash are far more important.  


^this. I was a medic/FF for 15 years and a medical bracelet was the most commonly recognized item. Other than that, medics aren't going to go through pockets, inspect stickers on helmets or look for flash drives hidden on your bike. Except for the bracelet, how would you know if any of the gear the person was wearing was his or hers-borrowed? Can't take the chance...
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« Reply #111 on: February 04, 2013, 08:21:12 pm »

Here's a question that maybe you medic-type peeps can answer for me.   Peter somehow got his old PO Box listed on his driver's license instead of our home address (I know you're not supposed to be able to do this, but it somehow got through the system).

So, my question is:  does this really matter? Like, if he were to be in an accident, say, and they use his driver's license as ID, does having the physical address of the house aid anyone in any way?  Or does it really not matter?  I'm not sure whether I should push him to change the address on his license or not.
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« Reply #112 on: February 04, 2013, 10:32:00 pm »

How about some of these? http://www.mydogtag.com/
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« Reply #113 on: July 18, 2013, 05:41:41 pm »

just a couple points as a person who has been unconscious and helped by EMTs after a crash. One  my helmet was taped to a back board immediately to stabilize my neck. no one is going to see any info on the back of the helmet. Two  my pants and jacket or cut off immediately BUT the tech still found my legally carred concealed weapon when he tried to cut though it while cutting off my pants. he gave it to a state police officer who later returned it to me and no the officer was not nice about it at all. No one looked though my pockets and my phone was in my tank bag and  never made it through the crash. when i finally woke and was stable they asked me directly about my info.
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« Reply #114 on: June 20, 2014, 04:02:27 pm »

Haven't read all the posts here but for someone in my position, meaning no health/prescription issues, I have typed up a list of people and their pertinent info and listed them as Emergency Contacts on a red piece of paper next to my driver's license. That is where medical or ER people would go to find my name and so forth anyway. I always tell those on the list I will be on the road so they can be prepared for the worst case scenario should it happen.

Info on helmet, on/in bike, zipped in an inside pocket somewhere can be easily overlooked when everyone is trying to help a seriously injured accident victim that is unconscious or loopy.
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« Reply #115 on: March 20, 2015, 09:33:19 am »

ok but i think that the better place for information like this is your bike clothing because if your bike is heavily damaged nobody will find your piece of paper ever.
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« Reply #116 on: March 20, 2015, 06:02:38 pm »

I'm not the sharpest pencil in the box but ER/police are always going for the drivers license and they will have to move the "red" ER/info piece of paper wrapped around my DL to see who I am. A no brainer for me.
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