Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 5 6  All   Go Down
Print

Topic: Emergency Contact Info  (Read 116978 times)

0 Members and 3 Guests are viewing this topic.
black hills
*

Reputation 58
Offline Offline

GPS: Rapid City, SD
Miles Typed: 5769

My Photo Gallery




Ignore
« Reply #20 on: March 06, 2007, 12:26:23 pm »

All great info, but I'm just wondering, would a hospital give you blood based on your info? Wouldn't they type you first to be sure? I would think allergies to medications would be very important and perhaps the # to your local hospital/doctor. that way medical personel could get your rmedical records and contact info quickly and accurately?  
Logged

'04 CBR1000rr '09KTM300exc '11 990Adventure R
the above opinion is simply that of an average middle aged hick with one too many brain injuries... or, don't take it too serious.
Sport-Touring
Advertisement
*


Remove Advertisements

Shoganai
Let's do some living!
*

Reputation 0
Offline Offline

Motorcycles: 1993 K1100RS "The Shop Whore" , 1994 K1100RS "Blue Streak"
GPS: Culpeper, VA
Miles Typed: 187

My Photo Gallery





Ignore
« Reply #21 on: December 04, 2008, 03:53:54 am »

Emergency Medical Information

I wear a typed, laminated card around my neck.
It contains the following information.

On one side, my name, address, allergies, surgeries, fractures, and conditions.

On the other side, organ donor, no blood reactions, no long term feed tube or life support and three contact persons.

On a separate typed, laminated card I list my medications.


Iíve only used it once but it was there when I needed it. I donít remember much but the woman that found me in the ditch in the middle of the night told me later that all I could say over and over again was, ďCall SteveĒ and I was holding up that card.

She called Steve, after calling 911 and they called the chopper.

Later I learned that my cell phone, and most of my other electronics were destroyed, bike totaled, and all my riding gear except my gloves and boots were cut off.

Due to my concussion, I could not have given my medical history.




My reasoning for the card was based on my time as an ER nurse.
The first thing EMS does is cut your clothes off to assess and place EKG leads.
They donít look on you helmet for stickers. (nor does ER Doc)
They donít generally look at zippers for pouches. (nor does ER Doc)
They donít look at your cell phone. (nor does ER Doc)
They donít look for flash drives. (nor does ER Doc)

It would be on my body dead or alive.
Logged

People living deeply have no fear of death. - Anais Nin
bahwolf
*

Reputation 0
Offline Offline

Motorcycles: ZZR1200, F650GS Dakar, CRF230F, Triumph Tiger, CBR1000RR, CRF450X, Hypermotard 1100S, R1200GS
GPS: OKlahoma City
Miles Typed: 375

My Photo Gallery


On the road again...


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #22 on: December 04, 2008, 07:57:28 am »

I carry a laminated card in my wallet and wear one of these around my neck, both with all the pertinent contact and medical information (information is on the side of the dog tag that you can't see in the photo). The RoadID tag -- stainless steel, reasonably priced -- is also available as a bracelet.

Logged
Advertisement



FJR1300
*

Reputation 33
Offline Offline

Years Contributed: '07, '08
Motorcycles: 2012 Honda CBR250
GPS: Jefferson City, MO
Miles Typed: 4614

My Photo Gallery



WWW

Ignore
« Reply #23 on: December 04, 2008, 09:20:52 am »


I have spoken to some EMTs about the "ICE" contact in a cell phone.  They have all shrugged and said they'd never heard of such a thing.    I ordered one of those things from Cyclegadgets.com...seems like a good thing.


I'm a cop and as a first responder, I can tell you most people don't know about ICE.  Also... a lot of departments have policies that do not allow their staff to get into your cell phone unless you give them the okay.  If you are unconscious, you won't be able to tell them it's okay.
Logged

Thundergod
*

Reputation 6
Offline Offline

Motorcycles: 2008 Kawasaki C14
GPS: Colorado
Miles Typed: 2623

My Photo Gallery





Ignore
« Reply #24 on: December 04, 2008, 09:31:29 am »

I keep this information in my wallet, sandwiched between my driver's license and medical insurance card.
Since my wallets is always on my person. It wouldn't make sense to keep it on my bike/car.

It travels with me, no matter where I am. Hell I could be hit by a car crossing the road as a pedestrian... emergency information on my bike won't help me there, it only works if it travels with you.



« Last Edit: December 04, 2008, 09:33:15 am by Thundergod » Logged

Start at mile zero.
tjhess74
Burning old dinosaurs is what I do
*

Reputation -17
Offline Offline

Years Contributed: '08
Motorcycles: 2008 Kawasaki Concours 14
GPS: North Charleston, SC
Miles Typed: 2160

My Photo Gallery


two of my favorite things...


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #25 on: December 04, 2008, 09:36:05 am »

i am also former leo, and i can say that all i would look for was an id to hand off to the medics upon arrival if you were in sleep mode.  honestly, i would limit the amount of you and your stuff that i touched for liability purposes.
\

moderators: can we make this topic a sticky?...as there have been a few threads on this topic with some great ideas.
Logged

i ride.  to work, to home, to the store, to kill time.  doesn't matter when, what the weather, or with who.  i ride.

Iron Butt Association #30337
2Pokey
I'm worth a million in prizes
*

Reputation 0
Offline Offline

Motorcycles: 2000 Honda Valkyrie Interstate, 2007 Yamaha FZ6
GPS: NE Ohio
Miles Typed: 254

My Photo Gallery




Ignore
« Reply #26 on: December 04, 2008, 09:55:44 am »

Ohio has a new program through the BMV that keeps emergency contact info for just such purposes. The info can be loaded and updated as needed at the BMV website.

"Next of Kin (HB 392) Ė This new statute creates a voluntary program, allowing those with a valid Ohio driver license, commercial driver license, temporary permit or identification card to submit two emergency contacts to the Ohio Bureau of Motor Vehicles (BMV), to be used by law enforcement in the event they are seriously injured or killed in an automobile crash.  If the individual is involved in an emergency situation or is otherwise unable to communicate, law enforcement will use the information to notify these emergency contacts."
Logged

Rules of the Road:
Feel the Power
Enjoy The Ride  Pick YOUR Pace.
Underdog
'05 FJR 1300
*

Reputation 10
Offline Offline

GPS: Chaplin,CT
Miles Typed: 16

My Photo Gallery




Ignore
« Reply #27 on: December 04, 2008, 07:51:44 pm »

www.roadid.com  Check out this site, they have some good stuff.
Logged

I am a motorcyclist, that's all there is to it.
jsanford
Devil Duck Monster
*

Reputation 14
Offline Offline

Years Contributed: '09
Motorcycles: '04 Moto Guzzi Breva 750 '08 Ducati Monster 695
Miles Typed: 1509

My Photo Gallery


Every day is Ride to Work Day




Ignore
« Reply #28 on: December 04, 2008, 08:00:19 pm »

All of this is very interesting--when I crashed on my bicycle, my ID, insurance card etc. got cut off with my riding jersey and went away.

Of course, I wasn't alone and Jane-Doe'd when it happened; maybe the EMTs would've check if I were.
Logged

'08  Monster 695   '04 Moto Guzzi Breva
Shoganai
Let's do some living!
*

Reputation 0
Offline Offline

Motorcycles: 1993 K1100RS "The Shop Whore" , 1994 K1100RS "Blue Streak"
GPS: Culpeper, VA
Miles Typed: 187

My Photo Gallery





Ignore
« Reply #29 on: December 05, 2008, 12:14:48 am »

A couple more things;

1. Carrying your blood type is for your information only. Before giving blood, you will be typed and screened. In a STAT situation, O- is given.

2. If traveling outside you home country, a flash drive containing photo copies of important paperwork like your DL, insurance, medi-vac, contact numbers for your CC, pass port, immunizations or any legal documents is not a bad idea.

3. Have somebody you talk to EVERYDAY while on the road, and they have your general route info.Tell them the last place you were and the next place you are going. They should be armed with what to do if you miss a check in.
« Last Edit: December 05, 2008, 12:20:23 am by Shoganai » Logged

People living deeply have no fear of death. - Anais Nin
dm_gsxr
*

Reputation 32
Offline Offline

Years Contributed: '05, '06, '07, '08, '09, '10
Years Supported: '11
Miles Typed: 4890

My Photo Gallery




Ignore
« Reply #30 on: December 05, 2008, 08:08:26 am »

Just as a reminder, the STN Locator has an option where you can provide contact information in case of an emergency. If you have it available (bring it with you on a trip), there's a good chance you'll be close to an STNer. Of course not for accidents but we may be able to help with getting your gear or bike from a storage lot and storing it for you until you're able to retrieve it for example.

http://www.stnlocator.net

Carl
Logged
Scoop
National Man of Mystery
*

Reputation 15
Offline Offline

Years Contributed: '06, '10
Years Supported: '11
GPS: Thunder Bay Ontario
Miles Typed: 1557

My Photo Gallery





Ignore
« Reply #31 on: December 05, 2008, 01:12:27 pm »

I just have "DNR" tattooed on my chest.  Any it had better be obeyed!!!
Logged

"Gender Box"...Rocketbunny
"but in reality the optimal pace can only be confirmed in hindsight"...Gene
blueskies01
*

Reputation 0
Offline Offline

Motorcycles: 2002 VTX 1800c
Miles Typed: 6

My Photo Gallery





Ignore
« Reply #32 on: December 09, 2008, 11:00:15 am »

Awesome thread. I really like the dog tag idea and the ResQTag. Looks like I will get both as some here said that info on clothes is not really checked or considered to be 100% reliable.

Thanks for a great thread and invaluable info.

Marc
Logged
sarc
*

Reputation 0
Offline Offline

Motorcycles: Kawasaki Ninja 650R
Miles Typed: 7

My Photo Gallery




Ignore
« Reply #33 on: December 10, 2008, 10:57:22 am »

As a former EMS worker, I can say that the ICoE / pocket stuff does not help much in the field.  If it is that serious, the first and really only priority is to get you stabilized on the way to definitive care (local ER or more likely the nearest trauma center) as quickly and safely as possible.  If you are unconscious from the crash, all of your clothes will be cut off to look for injuries (winter clothes especially can soak up a tremendous amount of blood or hide some serious deformities).  The clothes may or may not end up in the ambulance with you.  Also, pants shred, jackets tear, pockets open, etc, so relying on them to hold you information is not the best course of action.  

However, I still have ICoE programmed onto my phone, as well as contact info in my wallet.  Eventually, someone at the hospital will try and identify you and contact the appropriate people.  If probably won't be the ER staff, but if you are admitted or are stabilized in the ER, someone will go through and try to figure out who you are.  At that point, all the extra pockets / cell phone info may come in handy, assuming it survived the crash and made the trip with you.  I've never seen anyone insert a USB drive into a hospital computer to access it (potential viruses, all the other patient info on the network, etc. scare almost anyone off).

Dog tags or something firmly attached to your person (not string) is the best bet, even if it only has your name and BLOOD TYPE.  I know that in my area, blood shortages are not at all uncommon, so make it as easy as possible to identify to avoid the very nasty transfustion reactions that can occur.  

Also, as an aside, take the 30 minutes to donate on a regular basis, especially in you are a universal donor.  It really can save a life, and karma being what it is, the donation may just save your life as well.
Logged
Scoop
National Man of Mystery
*

Reputation 15
Offline Offline

Years Contributed: '06, '10
Years Supported: '11
GPS: Thunder Bay Ontario
Miles Typed: 1557

My Photo Gallery





Ignore
« Reply #34 on: December 10, 2008, 11:54:58 am »



Also, as an aside, take the 30 minutes to donate on a regular basis, especially in you are a universal donor.  It really can save a life, and karma being what it is, the donation may just save your life as well.


Excellent point.  I donate (my whole family does) on a regular basis.  


« Last Edit: December 10, 2008, 01:02:36 pm by Scoop » Logged

"Gender Box"...Rocketbunny
"but in reality the optimal pace can only be confirmed in hindsight"...Gene
denisep
*

Reputation 0
Offline Offline

Years Contributed: '08
Motorcycles: 2008 Kawasaki ZZR600, Plasma Blue
GPS: Kernersville, NC
Miles Typed: 302

My Photo Gallery





Ignore
« Reply #35 on: December 10, 2008, 12:35:53 pm »

I've been wearing a RoadID for 2 years...  I wear it on and off the bike..  you can choose a design for the front and put your emergency info on the back.  I have my husband's two contact numbers and my doctor's name/number as well as my name, etc.  

I believe I had an email at home with a coupon for December if anyone is interested (maybe 10% off or something)
Logged

keeb
*

Reputation 2
Offline Offline

Motorcycles: K6 SV650
GPS: Newport News, VA
Miles Typed: 68

My Photo Gallery


Live fast. die younG.




Ignore
« Reply #36 on: December 18, 2008, 01:02:57 pm »

What's the bottom line on blood type information?  Is it actually beneficial, or really just unnecessary?
Logged
Sandbag
*

Reputation 0
Offline Offline

Years Contributed: '08, '09, '10
Years Supported: '11
Motorcycles: 02 VF750, 02 CBR 1100XX, 03 XR650L, 78 CB750K, 03 VFR800, 75 CB750K
GPS: Roanoke, VA Area
Miles Typed: 163

My Photo Gallery


Slow Sucks




Ignore
« Reply #37 on: December 22, 2008, 06:07:26 pm »

Dog tags.  You can order them over the net.  SOP for EMT is to strip you if you could have trauma & are not able to answer questions.  Where it around your neck & they will find it.
Logged

Tim G. AKA Sandbag
Shoganai
Let's do some living!
*

Reputation 0
Offline Offline

Motorcycles: 1993 K1100RS "The Shop Whore" , 1994 K1100RS "Blue Streak"
GPS: Culpeper, VA
Miles Typed: 187

My Photo Gallery





Ignore
« Reply #38 on: December 22, 2008, 11:30:33 pm »


What's the bottom line on blood type information?  Is it actually beneficial, or really just unnecessary?

As a medical professional for 13 years, I have to say it's pointless.

In a trauma code, they'll give you O neg. w/o typing and cross matching or His-Span blood volume expander. Anything else requires STRICT protocol including type and cross matching. This is done by a Lab tech that verifies patient ID, and at the time of the blood draw, a Holister Blood Band is put on the patient. If that blood band ever comes off, the process must start all over again.

Logged

People living deeply have no fear of death. - Anais Nin
Scoop
National Man of Mystery
*

Reputation 15
Offline Offline

Years Contributed: '06, '10
Years Supported: '11
GPS: Thunder Bay Ontario
Miles Typed: 1557

My Photo Gallery





Ignore
« Reply #39 on: December 23, 2008, 01:03:57 pm »

There ya go.  So, no point in anything else.  Just tattoo DNR on your chest and be done with it Bigsmile
Logged

"Gender Box"...Rocketbunny
"but in reality the optimal pace can only be confirmed in hindsight"...Gene
Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 5 6  All   Go Up
Print
Jump to:  



ST.N

Copyright © 2001 - 2013 Sport-Touring.Net.
All rights reserved.

 
SimplePortal 2.3.1 © 2008-2009, SimplePortal