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Topic: Emergency Contact Info  (Read 110316 times)

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motorcyclelarry
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« Reply #80 on: January 14, 2010, 05:16:09 pm »

I have one of these for cycling
http://www.roadid.com/Common/default.aspx
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« Reply #81 on: March 18, 2010, 12:18:31 pm »

I thought I'd chime in too.  I used a label maker and put a large enough white label with red font with the following info near the helemt straps;
-Name
-emergency contact number
-blood type

My thinking is the helmet will be removed at some point and hopefully either EMT or hospital will see the label when they cut the helmet off.

I like alot of the inputs posted and will keep a card with detailed info in my jacket and wallet.

Thanks
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« Reply #82 on: March 30, 2010, 02:26:06 am »

+1 on the dog tags. Name, SSN, and blood type. Although...Am I right in thinking that you ER professionals can look up what you need to know with my SSN or should I have more info printed on the tag? Maybe just add NKDA?
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« Reply #83 on: May 09, 2010, 12:57:20 pm »


I have spoken to some EMTs about the "ICE" contact in a cell phone.  They have all shrugged and said they'd never heard of such a thing.    I ordered one of those things from Cyclegadgets.com...seems like a good thing.


I've been an active EMT since '06, and I admit I had never heard about "ICE" until a couple years back, even then it seems no one uses it.  I've had to resort to looking for "mom" or "dad" in a youngsters cell phone. It seems to be picking up speed though, I've seen some of these newer phones have an easily accesable ICE button/icon in the cell phone.  
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« Reply #84 on: May 15, 2010, 12:55:20 am »


There is NO logic that justifies NOT putting an I.C.E. entry in your cell phone.  The boy scouts and military taught me that preperation effects final results.



You mean logic like "What the hell does it matter if my emergency contact isn't notified immediately?"

KeS
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« Reply #85 on: May 28, 2010, 06:43:06 pm »


I have one of these for cycling
http://www.roadid.com/Common/default.aspx



+1 for Road ID, I have one for when I run and will wear it when I hit the road July 4th weekend

JQ
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« Reply #86 on: May 31, 2010, 01:16:22 pm »


  I carry a spare key and a laminated version of this.... http://www.medids.com/free-id.php  around my neck when I ride. I figure if I crash, someones going to cut off most of my clothes so no point in filling my pockets with stuff. A small tag on the side or back of my helmet might be missed. Not many people are realistically going to have time to plug in a memory stick into a lap top and try and figure out who I am either.



+1 on FREE, combined with the fact that you can update it as needed and include routine meds etc.


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« Reply #87 on: June 02, 2010, 01:58:03 pm »

Good tips ,  I keep a card in my wallet that says in case of Emergency call ..

Also as I have a fairly unusual last name ( only 19 of us in NA), and I always carry my cell, it's not a big leap for them to figure out who to call.
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« Reply #88 on: June 03, 2010, 08:09:50 pm »


+1 on the dog tags. Name, SSN, and blood type. Although...Am I right in thinking that you ER professionals can look up what you need to know with my SSN or should I have more info printed on the tag? Maybe just add NKDA?


 Headscratch  Didn't know ERs could look people up by SSN unless they were already in the system.  That might work for your local hospital, but I don't think it would work when traveling.

Point of contact name and phone number, next of kin, ALLERGIES if any (which you don't).

Keep a copy of your insurance card in as many places as you can -- pockets, bags, etc.

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Also as I have a fairly unusual last name ( only 19 of us in NA), and I always carry my cell, it's not a big leap for them to figure out who to call


A cell can be broken during the crash or thrown down the road and lost.
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« Reply #89 on: August 19, 2010, 05:44:10 am »

the above list of goods would be utterly essential in any emergency. Thank you.
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« Reply #90 on: September 05, 2010, 01:14:59 am »




I don't want to be dead necessarily, I just don't want to be subjected to the sure and slow death in the hospital.  If I'm gone, I'm gone.  Leave me in the ditch please.


God Bless the EMT's... for if it wasn't for them doing such a Great Job on me in '83 I wouldn't be here today enjoying all of the fantastic riding that I've had the pleasure of. Not all folks resuscitated have a "sure & slow death in the hospital".  
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« Reply #91 on: September 30, 2010, 09:57:36 am »


In light of a new season coming on, and some other instances that have happened to me, and others recently, I just wanted to bring this up.

What happens when shit happens and you are not able to talk to answer questions? Who do you want contacted in case of an accident? What type blood do you have? Insurance info?

Where do you keep this info so that it is readily available? In your pockets? In the tail section of your bike? Tank bag?

What happens if the bike burns and all of that info is destroyed?

1st off, use the I.C.E. system in your cell phone. (In Case of Emergency) This is recognized as a fast way to look up contact info for the ones you want called in case of an accident. Failing that, what next?

I recommend using the medical pouches that attach to your helmet. Enter all pertanant info on the sheet and then attach it to your helmet. It will be visable there and readily available to EMT personnel.

This company will send you one a month for free as well.

http://www.cyclegadgets.com/Products/product.asp?Item=MICS

I just ordered 10 of them in addition to the free one and will be handing them out to everyone the next time I head to Deals Gap!


I am new here, but I am a bicyclist as well and there is a great company called roadID, they can be found at www.roadid.com This is one of the best companies I have ever dealt with. They have several product options, including dogtags. I use the wrist ID's, I have 2 of them, very stylish as well. I use the interactive version. I could explain it all, but it is best just to check out the site. Thanks for listening.
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Scoop
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« Reply #92 on: October 22, 2010, 08:41:08 pm »




God Bless the EMT's... for if it wasn't for them doing such a Great Job on me in '83 I wouldn't be here today enjoying all of the fantastic riding that I've had the pleasure of. Not all folks resuscitated have a "sure & slow death in the hospital".  


Yes, but odds are.....
The sure and slow death doesn't come from the injury.  It comes from the C Difficile that you catch while in the hospital and the multitude of side effects from the meds given to counteract the ongoing side effects from other meds that were given to try to deal with the illness that you picked up from the frickin hospital in the first place.  Not to mention the "wet behind the ears" youngsters that are graduating from med school these days and pretending to be doctors.  Sorry if I go against everyone else, but I have a very firm belief that hospitals are a very good place not to ever be.  I am resolved to fight to the best of my abilities to not be taken there.  If I am not able to fight, then I will be leaving the second that I am able.  My kids have very clear instructions to remove me from any hospital regardless of risk or cost.  Wrong or right, it's my opinion and it's based on solid evidence.  At least around here anyway!
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« Reply #93 on: November 18, 2010, 11:07:01 am »



 Sorry if I go against everyone else, but I have a very firm belief that hospitals are a very good place not to ever be.  I am resolved to fight to the best of my abilities to not be taken there.  If I am not able to fight, then I will be leaving the second that I am able.  My kids have very clear instructions to remove me from any hospital regardless of risk or cost.  Wrong or right, it's my opinion and it's based on solid evidence.  At least around here anyway!


As a lifelong motorcyclist, emergency nurse (at least that seems life-long), retired helicopter flight nurse / paramedic who has worked in many settings in a long, satisfying career, I can hardly agree with you more.  Do not allow any of your loved ones to be admitted to a hospital for any reason unless they are accompanied 24/7 by a knowledgeable advocate.    The level of experience in emergency departments around here and elsewhere is appalling.  And heaven forbid that you crash in July when the medical / surgical residency programs absorb another load of newly graduated "physicians".

Another observation is..... there is no need to put your blood type on any identification.  We're not going to pay any attention or believe it anyway.  If you need blood you are either going to wait (if you can) until your type and crossmatch is finished or you are going to receive O negative, the universal donor type.

What we in the emergency professions need to know is your approximate age, any medications, any allergies, any pertinent medical history, and the mechanism of injury that resulted in your coming to see us.

As for me, I just ordered a "RoadID".  Thanks for that suggestion.  My wife and sons will be the best guide of medical care should I be rendered unable to do so... so I have listed their contact methods there.

Wow, a really opinionated first post, huh?  Smile

Safe riding!

Dwain
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« Reply #94 on: January 14, 2011, 11:27:44 am »

A very good first post.    This info right here

Quote
What we in the emergency professions need to know is your approximate age, any medications, any allergies, any pertinent medical history, and the mechanism of injury that resulted in your coming to see us.


Is invaluable as anything else.  It SIMPLIFIES what we need to carry.  That tiny amount of info can be easily applied to any helmet via a label maker and put on a dog tag or something like that and take up very little space.  Mine would go something like this.  Infact I'm about to do a label for my helmet now.  Maybe color it red??

Dxxxx, Jxxxxx D. (xs will equal real info lol)
Age: 25
NKMA (is this a commonly accepted abbreviation for No Known Medical Allergies?  This is what the Navy docs write all over our stuff)

Currently my helmet sports a label maker sticker on the chinbar that states "DO NOT REMOVE HELMET UNTIL EXAMINED BY MEDICAL PERSONNEL!"

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« Reply #95 on: January 14, 2011, 11:37:12 am »



Currently my helmet sports a label maker sticker on the chinbar that states "DO NOT REMOVE HELMET UNTIL EXAMINED BY MEDICAL PERSONNEL!"




LOL... good luck with that one. One of my rising buddies broke his neck, first thing the EMT's wanted to do was remove his helmet Rolleyes
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« Reply #96 on: January 14, 2011, 07:29:53 pm »

Here are some pics.  Thinking of trying to find RED tape or edge the name, age, ect in red with a red sharpie or something.  Or just leave it like it is.





Some small reflective triangles I cut from a large sheet of reflective material.
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« Reply #97 on: January 23, 2011, 08:02:18 pm »


Some small reflective triangles I cut from a large sheet of reflective material.



Too bad about the typo on the bottom sticker  Lol

Yeah, I wish that there was a better and more consistent way of putting information like this on a helmet.  Sad
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« Reply #98 on: January 23, 2011, 10:09:49 pm »


Too bad about the typo on the bottom sticker  Lol


Lol That's the first thing I saw, too.

I made one of those emergency contact cards like Gwen posted earlier in the thread and laminated it.  I put it on a lanyard to wear around my neck (under my jacket) on long solo rides....er, assuming I do that again someday.

Peter thinks I'm being totally morbid and is a little creeped out.  But hey, I think it's best to be prepared.  Thumbsup
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« Reply #99 on: January 24, 2011, 02:12:36 pm »

lacking some universal deal, I've been wearing one of these for the last couple of years . . . . I cannot comment on their effectiveness, thank goodness.

http://www.whitehorsegear.com/medical-information-carrier-system
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