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Topic: Re: Replace my crashed GSXR with Griso - 3yr, 8 months 100,000 miles later.  (Read 57423 times)

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« Reply #20 on: December 12, 2011, 03:09:45 am »


Ride a GUZZI, you'll never look back.


Dean


Yep, because everyone is in front of you.  Smile

I kid, a used Griso was on my shortlist for the last couple years for my "local" bike to supplement the Sprint.  Ended up with the Tuono, and don't regret it, but the Griso still causes a bit of lust (especially in black).

Also, et,  if you have $50 or so to spend, pick up a set of 2nd Gen Tuono mirrors on Ebay.  You won't regret it.
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« Reply #21 on: December 12, 2011, 03:41:54 am »


So last Saturday 12/3/2011 I test rode a Griso,
two days later Monday 12/5/2011 I applied for a loan,
3 hours later I got approved,
today Saturday 12/10/2011 I am now ~$15,000 in debt. Because I now have this  Bigsmile
...

40 degrees all day, I rode for ~100 miles, grinning the whole way.  Bigsmile


That's really lovely. Good on you for deciding 'what the hell, go for it' - beats regrets for roads not taken any day. I bet that was a big grin.
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« Reply #22 on: December 12, 2011, 07:26:32 am »


So last Saturday 12/3/2011 I test rode a Griso,
two days later Monday 12/5/2011 I applied for a loan,
3 hours later I got approved,
today Saturday 12/10/2011 I am now ~$15,000 in debt. Because I now have this  Bigsmile







40 degrees all day, I rode for ~100 miles, grinning the whole way.  Bigsmile


Beautiful Moto Guzzi - best of luck with it.  Keep us posted on how you get along, and if you install clip-ons & rearsets.   Thumbsup
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« Reply #23 on: December 12, 2011, 12:37:54 pm »

Congrats!

Best looking nekkid bike around.
Want.
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« Reply #24 on: December 12, 2011, 06:29:03 pm »

Sexy, sexy, sexy  Inlove, you are gonna have a ball with her, Congrats!
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« Reply #25 on: December 12, 2011, 11:32:28 pm »

Congrats.  Jealous.
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« Reply #26 on: December 13, 2011, 01:06:40 am »

Why the jelousy There are many Grisos out there to be had. Not so many 1100's nowadays but a host of 1200's. Yes, there were early problems with soft tappets. That was dealt with effectively by the factory. Yes, in certain markets only, there seem to have been a few other failures. They seem to be 'Market specific', rather than 'Model, (ie 8V.) specific. You make your own minds up. I' get on mine and ride to Perth tomorrow, (about 4,500Km from here.) with nothing more than a toothbrush and credit card.

Get out there. there are some killer deals on '09-'10 Grisos in the USA. all you have to do is look. If you want to make sure it's done right buy one off the 'Good Guy's' rather than the fly-by-night's

Apart from being really brilliantly styled they are a killer 'Road' ride. Not a racebike with lightsbut a genuine 'Road' bike that can scratch, tour and commute with great ease.

Don't look at one. sneer at its 'Mere' 100HP, heavy weight and long wheelbase. Your loss. Not ours.

Pete
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falconati
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« Reply #27 on: December 16, 2011, 11:50:44 am »

I've ridden one, I just haven't been able to sell my racebike for monies.
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« Reply #28 on: December 16, 2011, 06:09:06 pm »

et, you've just bought one of the best bikes on the market regardless of the label on the tank.   Cool

Congratulations!   Bigok   Clap Clap



A couple of years ago I did an 1100/1200 Griso back-to-back comparo here:  https://www.sport-touring.net/forums/index.php/topic,31915.0.html    and raved about the 1200.  It's sweeeet.   Banana
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« Reply #29 on: December 17, 2011, 09:34:30 am »

 Bigok Welcome to the club  Beerchug  
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et
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« Reply #30 on: December 17, 2011, 12:41:15 pm »

Thanks everyone for the encouragement !

Here's my impressions after one week of ownership and 900 miles:
(I was surprised to read that Guzzi's run-in period is 931 miles instead of the typical 600 miles.)
(Today I dropped it off at the dealer for it's first service. And will be getting it back same day. Cool !)

For the first 650 miles I kept the rpms between 2500 to 5000 rpm, never got above 70mph,
kept changing my speeds on the interstate, and rode two lane county/state roads as much as possible.
I just hope the 20 degree temps we had every morning this week didn't hinder the piston rings seating in correctly.
My fuel usage average was 38mpg during this time.

From 650 to 900 miles. I put db killer in the Termignoni exhaust and started to actually ride the bike as intended.
I was accelerating quicker and getting rpms into the power band. But still kept under 7000 rpm.
Mileage during these couple of tank fulls dropped from 38mpg to 33mpg.
The gas tank is very small. I'm filling up twice per day. Once every 110 to 130 miles.
I'm hoping the mpg improves as time goes by.

It's performance feels rather akin to a larger version of my sv650s; but with an upright seating position.
The handlebar feels too high and far back. I keep feeling like I'm going to fall off the back.
But that could be because I've been riding sportbikes with clip-ons and rearsets for over 20 years.
I still like to idea of installing clip-ons. But without rearsets knees would be jammed into my chest.
And no one appears to make rearsets for the Griso.
And I can see how clip-ons could be too narrow.
Perhaps a handlebar with no rise in it ?
Perhaps I will just leave it as is.

It feels a bit weak on the interstate compared to my 2000 GSXR-750.
At 90mph my 2000 GSXR was just coming into it's power band. And at 80mph the Griso feels like it's nearing it's limit.
But that's to be expected. And the Griso is still new. Need to see what occurs after a few thousand miles.
It almost reminds me of my 1986 Limited Edition GSXR-750.

Very tight fit when lane-splitting in stopped interstate traffic during commute. But that's not unexpected.
Besides; I really shouldn't be lane-splitting in NJ or PA anyway.
There's not enough gas tank to brace yourself against during braking. Must use handlebars; which is bad form.
But I'm certain as time goes by. The seat will probably break-in and give plenty of bracing support.

Last night at exactly 902 miles. I learned about all those Guzzi quirks.
It took me 3 hrs to change motor, transmission, + final drive oils !
I let all three drain for ~45 minutes and had learned which tools I'm missing. Such as 8mm hex socket. T-handle doesn't quite cut it.
The transmission drain too is too close to the charcol canister.
So I had to use aluminum foil to cover the charcol canister.
Same with final drive and rear wheel; had to use aluminum foil.
The transmission is just like an auto transmission. PIA to fill up.
Engine oil fill on "wrong" side. Would be nice if it was opposite side stand; to make it easier to add the oil.
Due to confined space. I was unable to get socket on drains for transmission + final drive.
I was forced to use an open end wrench. So was unable to accurately tighten to specified torque.

Although Intelligently. Moto Guzzi designed all three; engine, transmission, and final drive; to use the same drain plug. A M10x1.
Now if I can just find quickdrain plugs in that size.

All those little issues aside. It handles exceptionally well on the typical two lane county/state roads typical in NJ and PA.
And is a ball to ride. I'm riding those roads grinning the entire time. And at nearly the same pace as I did my GSXR.

I like the voltmeter, outside thermometer, snowflake that appears at low temps, voltmeter, and real time mpg reading that are all available on the instrument display.
And I'm certain I will learn more about the features available on the instrument display as time goes by.

I'm getting compliments everywhere I go. Even from non-motorcyclists.

All-n-all; I have absolutely no regrets. Because this bike is a hoot !

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« Reply #31 on: December 17, 2011, 12:52:59 pm »

Way to go et, I'm happy for you!   Clap
I like your idea of a no-rise (or less rise) handlebar until you get accustomed to the new riding position.
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« Reply #32 on: December 17, 2011, 01:33:42 pm »

 Thumbsup

Maybe Suburban Machinery bars would improve seating position while maintaining leverage for steering?
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« Reply #33 on: December 18, 2011, 11:48:20 am »

Sounds like a good honeymoon so far. My Stelvio came with a center stand and obviously has a small shield and different rider triangle, but on every bike I've had I give it a couple 1000 miles before changing seats, etc., most of it is a matter of getting used to each other. Fuel mileage will continue to rise and it took mine 10-12K to break in fully (just like BMW twins). I use tin foil or cardboard to direct oil into the pan on so many bikes, you'd think they would note how simple and clean you can do a service on UJM bikes. On the Stelvio there is a screw in plug the oil dip stick is inserted through, if you have that too, just unscrew that and a bigger funnel will fit and speed up adding the oil. A squeeze bottle with a nipple you can trim (like a caulking tube end) will allow you to pre fill it with needed amount of gear lube and then simply insert and squeeze till done. You are barely touching her erogenous rpm zone and at least for my Stelvio, I found her to be very long legged and very happy to cruise 115-125 (indicated, but she DRINKS petrol over 95-100 mph). I'm sure it hasn't the high end snap of your sport bike engine, but she is the anti-HD twin in design and practice. Not sure where load and aerodynamics limit her/you, but 90 is def "cruising" for this engine IMO. Good info on GuzziTech too.

Let her run and enjoy the engine braking too, makes it a real hoot surfing the curves and mountain roads.

Cheers and Safe Travels
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« Reply #34 on: December 18, 2011, 08:24:23 pm »

Congrats in the bike choice!   Thumbsup
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« Reply #35 on: December 19, 2011, 01:01:45 pm »

Quote
And at 80mph the Griso feels like it's nearing it's limit


 Lol Lol

Yeah, only about 60mph left to go.
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« Reply #36 on: December 19, 2011, 03:06:19 pm »

Yup, if it feels like its running out of puff at 60MPH thats only about 3,500RPM. My guess is that yu've still got the #01 map in and if you insist on running it with the dB killer out you'll be running it into the Texas sized hole in the midrange that is caused, principally, by the mapping and pipe.

As I said above, stick the dB killer in and aquire the new map and power becomes linear from 3,000 RPM up although for rapid acceleration keeping the engine spinning above 5,000 is the way to go. When the ECU is remapped you MUST get the TPS re-set afterwards. the 8V's are also VERY sensitive to throttle body ballance. Make sure it is done properly.

Pete
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« Reply #37 on: December 19, 2011, 07:22:58 pm »


A few tips.

1.) Target idle is 1200 RPM. That is where it is supposed to be. On no account try to change/lower it by adjusting the throttle stop screw on the LH throttle body. The speed is stepper controlled and all you will do is bugger the TPS refference.

2.) Ex factory they almost all seem to come with both air bleeds on the throttle bodies slightly open. This is WRONG. At first service get the TB's ballanced properly, (his is a two stage affair.) and then get the TPS re-set. There should only ever be ONE air bleed open. The 8V is particularly sensitive to TB ballance.

3.) Get the #68 map installed. Once again, when this is done the TPS HAS to be re-callibrated.

4.) Stick the dB killer in the pipe. It wll run much better.

5.) The suspesion takes a long time to break in an is over sprung and over damped. Don't be afraid to tune it. I pays huge dividends.

6.) Use the specified full synthetic oil or equivalent. The engine is oil cooled. A mineral oil will cook and your tappets will go south. You have been warned.

7.) They respond well to being flogged mercilessly. Don't ride like yer granny!

Enjoy!!!

Pete






Yup, if it feels like its running out of puff at 60MPH thats only about 3,500RPM. My guess is that yu've still got the #01 map in and if you insist on running it with the dB killer out you'll be running it into the Texas sized hole in the midrange that is caused, principally, by the mapping and pipe.

As I said above, stick the dB killer in and aquire the new map and power becomes linear from 3,000 RPM up although for rapid acceleration keeping the engine spinning above 5,000 is the way to go. When the ECU is remapped you MUST get the TPS re-set afterwards. the 8V's are also VERY sensitive to throttle body ballance. Make sure it is done properly.

Pete


When I took in for it's first service; I printed out your first reply and specifically asked them about #2 and #3.

The mechanic who did the work replied:

"
#2 Only if the bike runs in open loop down low, or this #86 map deletes the O2 sensor. Whether U turn the air screws in or out the O2 should compensate. But I did turn them all the way in, and turned the right side out until the TB's were synched. Seems to be a bit smoother !
"

"
#3 Never heard of this map. But it seemed to be an option for download. I could not download the map cause we did not have the pass code. Be we can contact Piaggio & see what they say about this.
"

When I picked up the bike; they said they would do as the mechanic suggested; and call Piaggio about the map.
I do recall one of the parts counter people saying that they had him searching all over for the shop for the box for the Termi exhaust came in because there is suppose to be a new ECU in there.
BUT when he found the box; there was no ECU. And they only had to install a new map.
I wonder what map they installed if they did not know about map #68 (if any) ?

I have to stop by tomorrow night after work or on my day off; Friday. Because the little retainer screw for the dB fell off.
So when I get a replacement screw (they said they have plenty); I'll also re-enforce they have to call Piaggio about the code for downloading map #68.

Thanks for the tips !

--ET
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« Reply #38 on: December 19, 2011, 11:08:27 pm »

What softwre are they using? Navigator or Axone?

Pete
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« Reply #39 on: December 19, 2011, 11:16:32 pm »

Oh and a C&P on how to ballance the TB's




The process is very simple.

First re-set the TPS and make sure that the throttle cables are allowing the throttle butterfly to reach the stop screw..

warm the engine up to >60*C and close both air bleeds.

connect guages/ballance tool to ports on manifolds and start motor,

Hold engine speed @ 3,800-4,000 RPM with the throttle and use the screw shown circled in the pic above to ballance the manifold depression at that speed.

allow the throttle to close fully and turn off engine. Check TPS setting and re-set it.

re-start engine and open the bleed screw on the side with the highest manifld depression until the depression equalizes.

That's it. Job done. It has nothing to do with the motor running closed or open loop and the idle speed is controlled by the stepper motor.

Pete

PS. Unlike certain other models there is no ECU supplied with the Termi pipe. It is a simple slip-on.
« Last Edit: December 20, 2011, 11:57:47 am by Pete Roper » Logged
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