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Topic: Re: Replace my crashed GSXR with Griso - 3yr, 8 months 100,000 miles later.  (Read 57398 times)

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« Reply #40 on: January 06, 2012, 02:04:56 pm »

I hope this is not signs of things to come.

Dealer attempted to install map #68.
The ECU is now dead.
Supposedly it is failing with an "ECU disconnect" error code.
Piaggio has agreed to replace the ECU under warrantee; since they are the ones who gave the dealer the access code.

So as it stands now; brand new Griso is dead after only ~2,000 miles.   Angry3

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« Reply #41 on: January 06, 2012, 02:11:09 pm »

I had some early issues with my dash, but were taken care of under warranty and my 1200 Sport has been good since, currently at 22000 miles.

Hope it works out for you after this is sorted.
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« Reply #42 on: January 06, 2012, 05:01:40 pm »

As explained on Guzzitech my guess is they interupted the upload in some way. The reboot data is the last thing installed after the mapping process is started. Interupt it and the ECU will need a full reprogramming. Only other thing known to cause ECU's to drop their load is poor earthing, Make sure the earth lead is correctly ositioned and tightened.

In this case though I think it sounds like the person driving the tooling made a mistake.

Pete
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« Reply #43 on: December 08, 2012, 09:07:52 pm »

Op here:

In two days it will be exactly 1 year since purchasing my Griso 8V.
In that year I have managed to put 35,000 miles on it.
So the verdict is; I like it ! Smile

Being that I have been riding Japanese sportbikes since the mid 80's.
It took a little getting use to a bike that had actual handle bars and no rear-sets.
For the first few thousand miles; whenever the Griso hit it's powerband near redline.
I kept feeling like I was going to fall of the back.

But that feeling is now mostly gone.
It only reappears on a Monday after doing a trackday or a raceday with my race bike; an SV650S with Woodcraft clip-ons and rear-sets.

Comparing the Griso to my previous 2000 GSXR750.
At normal street speeds; my usual 10 to 20 mph over most posted limits.
I really don't see much difference in performance.
The way the Griso handles you would not know it's 100 lbs heavier than my GSXR.
For daily riding the only thing the Griso lacks when compared to the GSXR. Is the amount of acceleration.
And I only miss that acceleration about 10% of the time. Like pulling out onto a crowded interstate during rush hour.
With the GSXR it was simply a matter of twisting the throttle and getting to 80mph in first gear in just a couple seconds.
Whereas with the Griso it takes a couple more seconds and a couple gear shifts.

Don't get me wrong; the Griso is no slouch. It's acceleration will still impress you.
In many ways it feels like a faster version of my '86 Limited Edition GSXR750R.
For being an air-cooled V-Twin; it's got a really nice horsepower rush near it's redline.
And yet still has a huge amount of low rpms torque. And huge amount mid-range torque and horsepower.
In fact I would say the power delivery of the Griso 8V's motor is perfect for the street.

What the Griso lacks in performance compared to my GSXR; it more than makes up for in maintenance.
All I've been doing is changing the oils; motor, gearbox, and shaftdrive (CARC); every 3 to 4 thousand miles.
And checking the valves every 6k miles.
With those jugs sticking out in the open; valve checks are so much easier than any other motorcycle I have ever owned.

At this time in the life of my GSXR; it had left me stranded in the middle of Manhattan 60 miles away from home. Due to a burnt out stator.

Don't get me wrong. The Griso is not without it's flaws.
It's horn and high/low beam switches are in very awkward positions.
For the first 10,000 miles I was constantly giving people angry turn signal cancellations instead of the horn.
The high/low switch requires a nearly complete removal of your grip on the handlebar to switch between high and low beams.
The automatic fast-idle (aka choke) appears to have failed. Causing me to manually elevate it's idle with the throttle in cold (ie 40 degrees F or lower) weather for the first minute or two.
But I haven't looked into that yet. It may be a simple fix.
Besides I've had other vehicles on which the automatic fast-idle never worked quite right.

The biggest complaint I have about the Griso is it's suspension.
It's under sprung and over damped.
Half of it's travel is used just sitting static. And it gives a very harsh ride on less than perfect roads.
In fact on Thanksgiving Eve I hit a pothole while changing lanes.
And this bent both front and rear wheels; and split the sidewall of the front tire.
But to be fair; this very same pothole may have damaged any motorcycle. Because it bounces 18 wheelers.

Even with these flaws; the Griso still has me grinning from ear-to-ear every time I go for a ride.

Here's how it now looks:
(Badly in need of a washing. Sorry but I'd rather ride than bathe it. Smile )







--ET
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« Reply #44 on: December 09, 2012, 02:38:41 am »

I'm terribly sorry but you are quite obviously horribly wrong.

*Everybody* knows that Moto Guzzi make motorbikes that are so horribly unreliable and 'Fatally Flawed' that they are only bought by masochists and mental defectives.

In fact everything about Moto Guzzi is just so hopelessly horrible that they should be outlawed! Twice! Maybe three times!

Your start up problem is probably because your bike is incorrectly tuned. I strongly advise you to replace the wheels, get your suspension rebuilt/adjusted by an expert and adjust your tyre pressures by the 10% method.

Then you can either a.) realise that the evidence of your experience is obviously wrong, the bike is a shitter and you are a dupe.

Or

b.) keep on doing what you've been doing and ride it problem free for another 100,000 miles.

I do strongly suggest you grease he swingarm and shock linkage bearings and on my bike which I've just given a major chassis overhaul to greasing the steering head bearings has made the steering a lot nicer but honestly. The only people who seem to be seriously panning the 8V models seem to be those with crappy service agents and mechanics who's bikes have NEVER been right.

I love my Griso. Its a bonkers 'Road' bike. A 'Turn Key' proposition and is so simple to service and tune compared to he opposition that my mind boggles as to why they don't sell by the boatload.

What would I know?

Pete
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« Reply #45 on: December 09, 2012, 09:39:12 am »

Thanks for the update et.  Thumbsup
The Griso is IMO the best looking Guzzi and you have done yours exactly how I'd mod mine, no more no less.
It's to bad my nearest dealer is 150mi. away.....
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« Reply #46 on: December 13, 2012, 06:27:23 pm »

et -

I know my Norge is not a Griso, but after doing the suspension upgrade to my bike, I can tell you it was the best spent $1K I could possibly have spent on it.  It feels like a completely different motorcycle.  Do both ends - rear shock and spring as well as front springs and cartridge emulators (if appropriate).  A world of difference.  Check on the GuzziTech board for complete details.

Listen to Pete Roper - he does know what he's talking about (at least when it comes to Guzzis  Bigsmile )

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« Reply #47 on: December 14, 2012, 09:09:07 am »

Really good to see you still enjoying the Griso a year later and 35k miles. Welcome to the dark side! Pass the word on to others and start converting.  Cool

Eric
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« Reply #48 on: February 07, 2013, 05:35:47 pm »

I have to say, I'm not surprised that you've had good luck mechanically with your Griso. I have near 40k on my Stelvio, and my wife has about 30k (also in just about a year) on her SE and neither of them have been to the shop for anything other than tires.

The Stelvio gets thrashed horribly and just keeps coming back for more. Both my wife and I did a 10k mile cross country trip this year including a jaunt up to Alaska and the only failures we had were a broken directional lens (Griso - stone from dumptruck) and a hinge pin on the Trax trunk on the Stelvio that just disappeared (replaced with a small nut and bolt and the next town's hardware store). We never once wondered where the nearest dealer was. Never even bothered to look before leaving.


I have had fantastic luck with all my Guzzi's though so I may be a bit biased. My 04 Ballabio has over 70k on it and it has never been down a day for anything other than a clutch replacement at 56k.

I'm glad to see that you still like your Griso after the first year. I've yet to meet anyone that had one and didn't like it. My bet is that it won't be your last Guzzi.  Smile
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« Reply #49 on: August 06, 2013, 09:08:21 pm »

May have taken 19 months.
But turned 50,000 miles on my Griso 1200 8V today on way home from work:



Was on my third drive chain, second stator, and second stv actuator on the GSXR by this mileage.

Although used oil analysis started showing much higher engine wear near 40k miles.
By 49k; used oil analysis is showing much less wear.
Maybe the motor is just starting to break in, maybe motor just has more wear during the winter, maybe air filter was not seated correctly, etc ....

No matter what; Griso is still running strong and I'm still loving it !

--ET
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« Reply #50 on: August 06, 2013, 10:47:12 pm »



... turned 50,000 miles on my Griso 1200 8V today on way home from work...





Frickin' awesome!  Bigok

The 4v per head Griso is the best bike Guzzi have ever made.   And you're right, the engine is a peach.   Thumbsup

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« Reply #51 on: August 07, 2013, 12:24:29 am »

What an unutterable pus-bucket! I'd trade it in on a BMW or a Honda before it kills you.

*Everybody* knows that Guzzis are unreliable shit-heaps. Especially anything post-Piaggio.

 Rolleyes

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« Reply #52 on: August 07, 2013, 11:27:55 am »

Thanks for the 50k mile "real world" update.  
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« Reply #53 on: August 09, 2013, 11:16:35 am »

Really great to read these kind of real world experiences on a MG! Thanks for posting.

Eric
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« Reply #54 on: August 11, 2013, 08:35:41 am »

 :popcorn:
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« Reply #55 on: August 11, 2013, 12:09:04 pm »


Ride a GUZZI, you'll never look back.


Dean


I hop that's not because nobody will ever be behind you.  lol
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« Reply #56 on: August 14, 2014, 12:19:13 pm »

We're about due for another mileage update ET?!!!  Bigok

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« Reply #57 on: August 14, 2014, 02:24:33 pm »

Op here,

Will be turning 78,000 miles on way home from work today.
Still loving this bike !

Still think what I've given up in performance compared to my previous GSXR.
Is more than made up for in ease of maintenance, riding something other than "just another rice-rocket" or cruiser, and the smile it puts on my face every time I through a leg over it.
And everyone; sportbike rider, Harley rider, even non-motorcyclists comment on how good it looks.  Wink

Although this past weekend, for a few hours I was double guessing myself.
I finally changed the alternator belt.
And it took me 7 hours !

I had trouble getting off the fuel tank.
First because the vent hose that leads to the tip-over valve and (long since) removed charcoal canister. Was clamped to the bottom of the fuel tank, was zip tied to the main wiring harness, and there was not enough excess hose to fit my hand or tools underneath the tank to disconnect this hose.
Being it was the very first time I had to remove the fuel tank. I did not know what to expect and was being extra cautious.
I ultimately left the hose connected to the fuel tank and instead disconnected it from the tip-over valve.
Second; I think due to the mileage and crud built up under the tank. I never was able to disconnect the fuel line from the bottom.
So instead of fully removing fuel tank; I simply used a block of wood to keep the front of it tilted up.

After raising the fuel tank. I had to remove right side coil, horn, ECU, alternator cover, and two of the three bolts of the alternator.
These consumed much of the time. Because I could not get a full wrench on many of these Allen bolts.
Due to their location; a socket or wrench would be blocked by the frame and/or main wiring harness.
I was regulated to using small Allen/hex key for most of them, doing a 1/4 turn, fumble with key, do another 1/4 turn, etc....
There were 3 different sizes of Allen bolts for the alternator cover alone.
Plus with a couple of the bolts; it was not possible to get a wrench on both the bolt and it's corresponding nut to tighten them
I had to tighten as best as possible by starting by hand and finishing with only the friction of nut-against-mount being the only resistance.

The actual replacing of the alternator belt only took a min or two.

After replacing the belt and putting everything back together. Took just as long as taking apart. Again particially due to my being cautious.
Reinstalling the alternator cover took several attempts. Have you ever tried starting an Allen bolt who's hole you can't see using the short end of a hex key ?
And upon reinstalling the plastic fuel tank; it felt like it grew 1/4 in in length.
The trick was to install all it's bolts in the same order you removed them; NOT the reverse order as you would expect and typically do.

In the end; the old belt still looked rather good and I decided next belt change will  be MUCH easier now that I know what will be involved.
And I'll probably have better tools.

Don't get me wrong. The above rant only temporarily diminished my love of this Guzzi.
Griso is still running strong. And I'm still very much happy I made the trade up from GSXR to Griso.
And I've had no issues with it. Just been riding it, changing fluids, tires, and brake pads.

The routine maintenance on this bike is still easy. Change oils regularly and adjust/check valves from time-to-time.
Valve checks are simple AND easy. You sit on a stool and the valves stare you straight in the face. Smile
Although I've added Stucchi-Luigi's new/improved crash bars which add a little annoyance to checking the valves.
Because you have to maneuver the valve covers off the head in a specific pattern to clear the crash bars.
But it's only a slight annoyance.

Almost from the beginning; I've been using Motul 7100 10w60 in the motor, AGIP 85W90 in the gear box, and AGIP 80w90 in the CARC (shaftdrive).
But now that the warranty is over and Motul appears to have lowered the amount of ZDDP in their 10w60.
I've begun switching to Redline's 10w60.
Last oil change was a mixture of Motul and Redline. Next oil change will be completely Redline.
I have no plans for switching away from AGIP for the gearbox and CARC.

I'll try to add photos in the next day or two.

BTW; did I say how much I still love this bike ?  Bigsmile

Update:
When I got home from work the day of writing the above. I changed the oils on my Griso.
And I discovered the following:


That's the bracket for the mid exhaust pipe that is broken. Sad
It wasn't like that last month when I changed the oils.

So I think it happened this past Tuesday when I was cut off on I-78 in Clinton, NJ.
I-78 in NJ sucks. There are many many long, narrow, deep potholes separating the lanes in many locations.
It's so bad in some areas; that it is unsafe to change lanes.

Anyway; I priced the parts to replace the mid exhaust pipe and the related screws, clamps, and gaskets.
The pipe is over $200, and each gasket and clamp are $30 each.
So replacing it will have to wait until next month. For now; I have safety wired the crap out of it.
Looks horrible; but it will do as a temporary fix.

This reminded me of the only drawback I see with the Griso.
Which is it's stock suspension. It just is not up to par for the weight of this bike.
I think it's typical Italian suspension. Under sprung and over damped ?
I've taken it a couple times to the same shop where I get my race bike's suspension done.
And they would like to see a little more pre-load on the suspension. Especially the rear.

As promised. I attempted to take photos of it.
The battery for my camera is dying. So in addition the the above photos of the broken bracket.
I was only able to get one photo of the bike before the battery died:


Yes I know it's dirty. But as I've said in the past. I'd rather ride it than bathe it.  Bigsmile
You may not believe me. But I do wash it every once in a while. Usually around every other tire change.

--ET
« Last Edit: August 16, 2014, 07:20:02 pm by et » Logged

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« Reply #58 on: August 15, 2014, 04:44:48 pm »

Have you downloaded Guzzidiag and Reader and Writer yet? If not do so, it will enable you to reset the TPS and all the adjustable parameters after servicing. We have some great mapping options for the G8 too.

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« Reply #59 on: August 16, 2014, 06:51:46 pm »


Have you downloaded Guzzidiag and Reader and Writer yet? If not do so, it will enable you to reset the TPS and all the adjustable parameters after servicing. We have some great mapping options for the G8 too.

Pete


No I haven't downloaded Guzzidiag and Reader and Writer.
However; shortly after purchasing the Griso; I bought Technoresearch's diagnostics tool from Guzzitech.
Though I haven't had to adjust anything on the Griso yet.

--ET
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