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Topic: chain maintenance during LD ride  (Read 14541 times)

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dietDrThunder
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« Reply #20 on: April 04, 2014, 06:26:13 am »



Not trying to piss on your cornflakes, but if you need to adj the chain ever couple of days (600 mile day X 3 = 1800miles) Ya might consider buying a better chain and leaving it with a bit more slack.



This.

If your chain and sprockets are in good repair, unless you're going to go 160mph the whole way, don't worry about lubing and adjusting your chain in the middle of a 1000 mile ride. Obviously there's nothing wrong with doing so, it's just not necessary. What is necessary is to give it a quick inspection every time you stop for fuel. Do this just in case you have an issue (usually presenting as a chain that is considerably looser than it was a couple of hundred miles ago). This shouldn't' happen if your gear is in good form, but anything is possible. As long as it still has the same slack as it did on your last stop, that's all the maint. you need.

Before you leave, make sure that the chain is clean, the sprockets are in good condition, and it's adjusted towards the loose end of the range. The #1 chain killer is adjusting them too tightly. I doubt there's ever been a survey, but I'd bet money that among street bikes that are regularly maintained, at _least_ 70% have a chain that is too tight. Chains are like valves: loose=happy, tight = unhappy*.

Now, if you're going to do 1000 miles+ day after day after day after day, yes some attention is warranted.


* note that 'loose' isn't the same thing as 'waaaaay too loose.' Use some common sense.
« Last Edit: April 04, 2014, 06:32:21 am by dietDrThunder » Logged

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« Reply #21 on: April 08, 2014, 06:06:01 pm »



Pro-Oiler is a bit more challenging to install (but not too bad) can be adjusted as you ride (rain/dust/sand/or dry) and varies the amount of oil on speed of the bike/chain. Also uses any kind of oil and a whole lot less than one might think.


I have had a Pro-Oiler on my last two chain drive bikes.

I will never own another chain drive bike without one.
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« Reply #22 on: April 18, 2014, 05:20:53 am »

This version was also released in 1991, and is very similar to the E-spec (as they are built in the same place), but with minor changes. The version sold in Japan was exclusive to Japanese Mazda dealerships, and was not badge engineered and sold at other Mazda Japanese dealerships, unlike the MX-3, the MX-5, and the RX-7 coupes.
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« Reply #23 on: April 18, 2014, 11:10:21 am »

There's a review of the motobrizz oiler on www.longridersradio.com in episode 1 podcast
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« Reply #24 on: April 18, 2014, 03:18:22 pm »


  Should I bring a can of chain lube with me?    
Sure, but I wouldn't personally bother using it unless you ride in the rain.
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matthew
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« Reply #25 on: April 25, 2014, 11:01:23 am »

I picked up one of these used for $20.  It's a handy little device

http://www.packjack.ca/
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« Reply #26 on: April 25, 2014, 12:56:34 pm »

That's nifty!
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« Reply #27 on: June 10, 2014, 07:25:02 pm »

As many others said, I sprayed the exposed parts of the chain at every gas stop. I fashioned a pouch on the front of my left side case for quick easy access on iron butt fillups. I never let the chain run dry and it did not require any adjustment for the entire 4800 mile trip. The chain and sprockets had over 10k on them when I started too.

I must admit I'm looking long and hard at the pro oiler though. I'll have another go at the BBG1500 soon and saving those chain spraying seconds might help.
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« Reply #28 on: June 11, 2014, 01:26:58 am »

My chain maintenance is the same for LD rides as short, day trips - WD40 about every 600km, or every two fillups. That's it. Just keep the chain clean. And I've been rewarded with >80K km chain life. I just installed my third chain on my 95 VFR at 167K km.

With a centrestand it's easy. Hold a cloth under a section of chain and spray. Rotate tire so chain moves away from sprocket teeth on lower rung. Repeat until the entire chain is done and wipe off excess. Give the swingarm a wipe. If you have a riding buddy, have him spin the rear tire while you hold the cloth under the chain and spray. Takes 10 seconds. When you do it this way it's important to rotate the tire as described above so you don't get your fingers caught in the chain.

I prefer a clean chain. The lubes and waxes attract dirt which I think actually shortens chain life. On my old bike, a 89 CBR 600, the first two chains lasted about 16K and 23K km respectively. The bike hasn't been ridden for a couple of years (belongs to my wife now) but has 24K km on the third chain.
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« Reply #29 on: June 11, 2014, 01:49:05 am »


My chain maintenance is the same for LD rides as short, day trips - WD40 about every 600km, or every two fillups. That's it. Just keep the chain clean. And I've been rewarded with >80K km chain life. I just installed my third chain on my 95 VFR at 167K km.
 

I'm glad YOU brought that up.  Lol On my last trip I kept the chain wet with WD-40. I did add a little Blue PJ-1 once in a while. A recent study featured in Iron Butt Magazine tested the most popular chain lubes and WD-40. The premise: friction = heat. Chains and sprockets were checked by infrared thermometer at certain mileage intervals. Of all the sprays tested, the lowest temperature readings were recorded on the bikes using WD-40 followed by Blue Label PJ-1. Lower still was the Scott oiler with ATF.  

Also, some time ago I remember watching that youtube video where some guy soaked o-rings in the "usual suspects" of chain lubes. The o-ring showing the least swelling/degradation was the one left in the WD-40. So I already knew it was o-ring safe and I'm glad I tried it on my trip.
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« Reply #30 on: June 11, 2014, 02:05:51 am »


I'm glad YOU brought that up.  Lol On my last trip I kept the chain wet with WD-40. I did add a little Blue PJ-1 once in a while. A recent study featured in Iron Butt Magazine tested the most popular chain lubes and WD-40. The premise: friction = heat. Chains and sprockets were checked by infrared thermometer at certain mileage intervals. Of all the sprays tested, the lowest temperature readings were recorded on the bikes using WD-40 followed by Blue Label PJ-1. Lower still was the Scott oiler with ATF. 

Also, some time ago I remember watching that youtube video where some guy soaked o-rings in the "usual suspects" of chain lubes. The o-ring showing the least swelling/degradation was the one left in the WD-40. So I already knew it was o-ring safe and I'm glad I tried it on my trip.
Yay, some "scientific" support for my practice.

When I first started riding in 87, the practice as preached in the popular motorcyclst mags was to spray on lots of lube when warm and wipe off the excess. So that's what I did. Result, 16K km chain life.

Then came chain wax. Result, 23K km chain life. An improvement.

Then they started recommending WD40 to keep the clean chain. So I did that with my CBR and my new 95 VFR. And I now get great chain life as noted in my previous post. So that's what I will continue to do because that's what I have found works for me. YMMV.
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