Pages: [1]   Go Down
Print

Topic: 2007 Bandit 1250 - Is it hard to change my own Sprockets?  (Read 6741 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
mrmlopez-ga
*

Reputation 0
Offline Offline

Motorcycles: Suzuki Bandit 600
Miles Typed: 1

My Photo Gallery




Ignore
« on: November 11, 2013, 10:29:23 am »

I am trying to determine how difficult it is to change my own front and rear sprockets on my 2007 Suzuki Bandit 1250ABS. Is it a daunting task, or is it something that a mechanically inclined owner can do? The front sprockets look pretty simple, but the rear sprocket involves taking the back wheel off and that seems intimidating. If you have done this on a Bandit 1250, please let me know about your experience and what your opinion is.
Logged
Sport-Touring
Advertisement
*


Remove Advertisements

falcofred
*

Reputation 5
Offline Offline

Motorcycles: 2010 Multistrada 1200 S Touring, 07 KTM SuperDuke, 05 Suzuki DR650
GPS: Extreme N.E. Tennessee
Miles Typed: 1055

My Photo Gallery





Ignore
« Reply #1 on: November 11, 2013, 12:37:35 pm »

If removing the rear wheel intimidates you, then you are not mechanically inclined. Take to a shop, or have a mechanically inclined friend help.
Sprockets are easy, cutting chain, riveting master link takes someone who is mechanically adept.  
« Last Edit: December 25, 2013, 09:35:12 pm by falcofred » Logged

How fast is too fast? How Young is too young? How High is too high?
ywgbandit
*

Reputation 0
Offline Offline

Motorcycles: 2008 Bandit GSF1250S
Miles Typed: 13

My Photo Gallery




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: December 25, 2013, 11:33:21 am »


I am trying to determine how difficult it is to change my own front and rear sprockets on my 2007 Suzuki Bandit 1250ABS. Is it a daunting task, or is it something that a mechanically inclined owner can do? The front sprockets look pretty simple, but the rear sprocket involves taking the back wheel off and that seems intimidating. If you have done this on a Bandit 1250, please let me know about your experience and what your opinion is.


   If you have adjusted your drive chain then taking your rear tire off to get at the sprocket should be no problem. If you are changing gear ratios you may need to shorten or lengthen your chain. You can get an inexpensive chain breaker to break and re rivet a new chain on Amazon and download instructions for it from the internet. If you need to shorten the stock chain, be aware that the only place you can get a new master link for your stock RK chain is from Suzuki and the part number is 50GSV3-RL. I couldn't even get one direct from RK and ended up ordering a chain with the correct # of links from the Sprocket Centre, with a master link and a spare master…just in case. *I was informed by RK that no other master link will safely work with the stock chain.*You should also buy a tool for aligning the chain and the sprockets as the indicator marks on the swing arm are notoriously wrong. Motion Pro Chain Alignment tool is cheap and effective.
   If you are going to gear your bike for higher rpm and more torque, you can drop the front sprocket down to a 17 tooth from the stock 18, and the stock chain will work If you want to lower your rpm for more relaxed rpm on the hwy., It is best to drop 3 teeth from the rear sprocket to 40 teeth, but to do this you need a 116 link chain from the stock 118 link and you will need the chain riveter/ breaker tool. Download a copy of the Bandit service manual and follow the instructions and the torque values and you should be fine.
   I have read that going up to a 19 tooth front sprocket to lower your Hwy. rpm may make the chain rub on the cast aluminium post that supports the clutch slave cylinder, but I have no first hand knowledge. If you want to see how changing the gearing will affect speed and rpm you can go to (http://www.gearingcommander.com) and plug in the numbers to compare. You may also want to consider a speedometer corrector, like the Speedo Healer, Speedo Tuner or the least expensive Speedo-DRD speedometer re-calibrator. Otherwise your speedo may be way out, as it is from stock anyway. Always good to check your speedo against a GPS……...Hope this helps.
« Last Edit: December 25, 2013, 11:52:20 am by ywgbandit » Logged

Borrow the money, buy the accessories, enjoy them before you sell! Life Is Short!
Advertisement



Baz
*

Reputation 22
Offline Offline

Years Contributed: '07, '08, '09, '10
Years Supported: '11, '12
Motorcycles: Yamaha FJR
GPS: St. Albert, AB, Canada
Miles Typed: 9028

My Photo Gallery





Ignore
« Reply #3 on: January 18, 2014, 05:00:32 pm »

The biggest battle you will have is removal of the front sprocket.

On my 1200 is came almost welded to the engine and I could not find a snipe large enough in my garage to get it off. I had to take it over to the local dealer to get it broken loose with their giant air impact wrench.

Other than that it is a very simple job for even the unhandy.

I will give you some advice however. Don't try to mess with the stock ratios. I did on mine and after trialing just about every combination, I found the stock ratio's were perfect for everyday riding.

Logged
Mr.Black
*

Reputation 152
Offline Offline

Years Contributed: '09, '10
Years Supported: '11
Motorcycles: '08 GSF1250
GPS: 01543
Miles Typed: 18512

My Photo Gallery





Ignore
« Reply #4 on: January 18, 2014, 07:46:22 pm »

This is a link to a step by step that helped me through it.
http://www.twtex.com/forums/showthread.php?p=401726

My front on the 1250 was a simple removal.

Good luck.
Logged

Sig lines used to be fun.
RodRides
*

Reputation 0
Offline Offline

Motorcycles: 04 & 06 VFR, 08 Sprint ST, 05 R1200GS
Miles Typed: 4

My Photo Gallery




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: October 03, 2020, 11:25:30 am »

Changing sprockets is not difficult if you have 1: Torque Wrench  2: Your bike's torque specifications from a shop manual.  The rest you can fin in this video.

https://youtu.be/7roUwXE9sOE
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
Print
Jump to:  



ST.N

Copyright © 2001 - 2013 Sport-Touring.Net.
All rights reserved.

 
SimplePortal 2.3.1 © 2008-2009, SimplePortal